No More Goddesses

No More Goddesses

by Kim Baccellia

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Overview

No More Goddesses by Kim Baccellia

Jordan Lake discovers an ancient bracelet in her grandmother's house and uncovers a family mystery that links her favorite actress, Audrey Hepburn, a romantic movie, and an aunt she never knew.

Jordan hopes the bracelet will bring her love. Instead, it brings one nightmare after another, unleashing Hathor, the Egyptian love goddess, who decides it's fun to mess with the McKnight High School social scene.

Jordan holds the key to vanquish Hathor, but will she figure out what it is in time to save her school, one of her best friends, and get a date to the Valentine's Day dance?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781612710129
Publisher: Zumaya Publications
Publication date: 05/28/2013
Pages: 244
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.57(d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

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No More Goddesses 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You’ve heard the old saying “Be careful what you wish for; you may get it.” I’d like to add that you may get something entirely unexpected, also, something you wish you hadn’t wished for, especially when goddesses are involved. In Author Kim Baccellia’s latest novel, NO MORE GODDESSESS, fantasy for MG/Tween readers, Jordan Lake dreams of Ethan Taylor, basketball star at McKnight High, inviting her to the Valentine’s Day dance, which is highly doubtful since she’s not a member of the “popular” crowd. The discovery of a bracelet at her grandma’s house, similar to the one Audrey Hepburn (her idol) wears in the movie Tessa’s Treasure, a diary, and Jordan’s sudden ability to see visions of what’s about to happen give Jordan hope. Maybe her wishes will come true, after all. The Egyptian Goddess Hathor and a cat called Bass may have other plans for Jordan, however. Only they know the truth. NO MORE GODDESSES is a fun read about friendship, school rivalries between the popular kids and the regular kids, and wanting what we don’t have when what we really want is right in front of us. A little history about the actress Audrey Hepburn brought back memories for me and ought to interest the younger generation too. I enjoyed the bit of history about Egyptian goddesses. The action is fast paced, with seldom a dull moment. My favorite character is Andrew, who’s always there for Jordan, though she has her eyes set elsewhere. Isn’t that the way true life works? Kim Baccellia has written a novel that should appeal to tween readers and adults, as well. The book would make a good addition to school libraries and classrooms for the historical aspect of Audrey Hepburn and Egypt. Fantasy, where characters are not always who/what they seem and keep the reader guessing the way NO MORE GODDESSES does, is always fun to read. So pick up a copy, relax, and enjoy. ###
StephWard More than 1 year ago
2.5 Stars 'No More Goddesses' is a young adult fantasy novel that follows main character Jordan Lake as she makes her way through high school, secretly crushing on one of the most popular boys at school. Her normal life takes a turn for the worse when she discovers an ancient bracelet in her grandmother's attic. A bracelet that just happens to release the curse of Hathor. Now Jordan has to find a way to vanquish the goddess before she wreaks havoc on McKnight High School's students, destroys the school, and any shot Jordan had at getting a date to the dance with the guy of her dreams. This was an interesting story with a unique plot. It's aimed for younger teen readers and the writing style shows this. The writing was well done, although at times it seemed as though the story was campy and a bit far fetched. I found that I couldn't fully immerse myself in the story or connect with any of the characters, which had a definite impact on my experience with the book. The characters were fun, but almost all of them seemed stereotypical and cliched. They didn't seem to have any sort of depth to them and nothing really changed that throughout the book. The story was intriguing and I enjoyed learning about the Egyptian mythology that was woven into the book. That brought a new level of interest to the somewhat lacking main plot. Overall, this book wasn't for me, but it would appeal to younger YA readers who enjoy mythology and fantasy novels. Disclosure: I received a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.