No One Belongs Here More Than You

No One Belongs Here More Than You

by Miranda July
4.0 45

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

No One Belongs Here More Than You by Miranda July

“These delightful stories do that essential-but-rare story thing: they surprise. They skip past the quotidian, the merely real, to the essential, and do so with a spirit of tenderness and wonder that is wholly unique. They are (let me coin a phrase) July-esque, which is to say: infused with wonder at the things of the world.” —George Saunders, author of Tenth of December

Award-winning filmmaker and performing artist Miranda July brings her extraordinary talents to the page in a startling, sexy, and tender collection. In these stories, July gives the most seemingly insignificant moments a sly potency. A benign encounter, a misunderstanding, a shy revelation can reconfigure the world. Her characters engage awkwardly—they are sometimes too remote, sometimes too intimate. With great compassion and generosity, July reveals their idiosyncrasies and the odd logic and longing that govern their lives. No One Belongs Here More Than You is a stunning debut, the work of a writer with a spectacularly original and compelling voice.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780743299411
Publisher: Scribner
Publication date: 05/06/2008
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 224
Sales rank: 89,107
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

Miranda July is a filmmaker, writer, and artist. Her stories have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and Harper’s. The story collection No One Belongs Here More Than You won the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award and has been published in twenty-three countries. She wrote, directed, and starred in The Future. Her film, Me and You and Everyone We Know, received a special jury prize at the Sundance Film Festival and the Caméra d’Or at Cannes. In 2014 she debuted the audience-participatory performance, New Society, at the Walker Art Center, and launched the messaging service app, Somebody.

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No One Belongs Here More Than You 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 45 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've found that people either adore Miranda July or loathe her. I am, personally, in the former. These stories were a nice break from all of the seemingly heavy things I've been reading lately- not that they were not meaningful, because, oh, they were. They were not full of superfluous language and clichés. They were like how it would be if someone told you about something that had happened to them or possibly, how you may think/narrate/feel inside your head. I found the book exceptional!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was browsing reviews for this book and I became irritated with people who did not understand July's writing. She is not writing, 'The sky is blue...' She goes above and beyond imagination. For those who like quirky, this book is it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a work of genius, a trans-genre satirization of modern life captured by way of a secular medium in the holest of ways. In keeping with avant-garde genius, this work should be trivialized, rejected and missed by the mass-minded. July, in both contemporary and historic terms, has done justice to literature in the 21st Century I truly cannot think of literary statements more articulate on the periodic condition in the last 100 years save for Henry Miller, Albert Camus, J.D. Salinger, Ira Levin, Brett Easton Ellis,and Chuck Palahniuk. Though in short-story format, her work must be considered equal to those formerly mentioned. Furthermore, I don't think a single pair of literate eyes could disagree.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Miranda July is the most wonderful writer of our generation. Her stories are so full of emotion and truth that they make your heart ache. This book is one of the most achingly poignant books I have ever read. Do yourself a favor and buy this book now!
Guest More than 1 year ago
As in her other work, July seeks to find connectedness between individuals, between the idividual and nature, and to her audience. She pretends to be a naive dreamer, but she is an observant witness to both human cruelty and naivete. Her stories have little to do with realism or with characters or with 'storytelling.' They are essays told in the form of narrative jokes, and comic timing is one of their primary strengths. I haven't been so captivated by the short story form since I discovered Kafka and O'Connor. July uses it to her ends, and has created, I think, a new kind of fiction in the process. I call it 'cosmic' because it views reality, desire, and being as an interconnected whole.
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She impresses me with everything she does and this book is no exception.
BOBWRITER More than 1 year ago
Because all but one of the stories in this collection are told in the first person, it is easy for me to visualize Miranda July, the writer, director and star of the film Me and You and Everyone We Know, as that character. Even though there are references to physical descriptions of some of these that don't resemble Miranda July at all, it is still easy to see the viewpoint as hers. I read these stories with an all-encompassing fascination not so much because of what they were really about or because of thematic threads but because of her unique perspective on the world and her skewed yet totally accurate way of expressing her observations. The difficulty I had with the film, which I did admire for its audacity and unique vision, was that other characters also seemed to be mouthpieces for Miranda and it would have been much more palatable for me, steeped in my realistic world view, to accept one character making these observations. Honestly, I simply haven't met many people with a bizarre perspective as unique and imaginative as Miranda July's. With these stories, however, all the observations, all the metaphors, all the unlikely connections are made by a Miranda surrogate and so they can all be seen as installments in a continuing monologue she delivers to the planet. What I carry with me are recollections of breathtaking passages such as the following: That is my problem with life, I rush through it, like I'm being chased. Even things whose whole point is slowness, like drinking relaxing tea. When I drink relaxing tea, I suck it down as if I'm in a contest for who can drink relaxing tea the quickest. Or if I'm in a hot tub with some other people and we're all looking up at the stars, I'll be the first to say, It's so beautiful here. The sooner you say, It's so beautiful here, the quicker you can say, Wow, I'm getting overheated. Or this: Past a certain age, they give up on the name games, which is regrettable for someone like me who loves anything that involves going around a circle and saying something about yourself. I wish there was a class where we could just keep going around the circle, around and around, until we finally said everything about ourselves. I will be interested in seeing more films from her. However, I really look forward to more fiction/autobiographical observation/rambling/whatever she wants to call what she writes. These stories have inspired me in my own creativity more than most of what I've read in many years. I cannot bestow any higher praise than that.
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melMP More than 1 year ago
a collection of short stories from artist/performer/writer Miranda July. while i wouldn't call this book un-put-down-able, i can't say i've found too many collection of short stories that are, her unique perspective is highly entertaining. each story defies categorization and, often times, after envisioning the story's voice in my head and my body, the short story revealed the protagonist to be an elderly man or someone else unexpected. my favorite story was Something That Needs Nothing. it expressed the quirkiness and self-reflection that a fan of July's "You Me and Everyone We Know" will anticipate and appreciate. As with all of Miranda July's work, a must for the permanent collection.
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