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North
     

North

5.0 2
by Louis-Ferdinand Celine, Louis C?line, Ralph Manheim (Translator)
 

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In this novel, Louis-Ferdinand Celine (Journey to the End of the Night, Death on the Installment Plan) offers us a vivid chronicle of a desperate man's frantic flight from France in the final months of World War II.

Overview

In this novel, Louis-Ferdinand Celine (Journey to the End of the Night, Death on the Installment Plan) offers us a vivid chronicle of a desperate man's frantic flight from France in the final months of World War II.

Editorial Reviews

Choice
“Céline, for all his garrulous ranting, was one of the most important voices in modern French fiction, and his influence on American as well as French novelists cannot be underestimated. [North] has already received favorable criticism in this country, and this excellent translation will undoubtedly increase Céline's public here.”
New York Review of Books
“Well worth reading by any student of the last days of the German Reich.”
Washington Post Book World
“North slams across our imminent fin-de-siecle pieties as a raw and dangerous abomination . . . Simply as the tale of a picaresque ordeal . . . North is fascinating and fizzy, but what makes it so potent as a document is the 'remarkable sensibility' that Gide commended. The prose has a dense inconsecutiveness brought about in part by Céline's favorite device of the three dots . . . (which both invite you on and trip you up), but also by his flair for letting his imagination range further than his analytical mind wants to go.”
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Celine's autobiographical and hallucinatory novel about the chaos of Europe at the end of WWII. (Sept.)
Library Journal
This 1960 volume was first published in English in 1972. The plot follows a man's desperate attempt to get his family out of Nazi-occupied territory as the Reich begins to crumble at the end of World War II.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781564781420
Publisher:
Dalkey Archive Press
Publication date:
09/28/1996
Series:
French Literature Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
454
Sales rank:
907,028
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 8.00(h) x 1.40(d)

Meet the Author

Louis-Ferdinand Celine (1894-1961) was a French writer and doctor whose novels are antiheroic visions of human suffering. Accused of collaboration with the Nazis, Celine fled France in 1944 first to Germany and then to Denmark. Condemned by default (1950) in France to one year of imprisonment and declared a national disgrace, Celine returned to France after his pardon in 1951, where he continued to write until his death. His classic books include Journey to the End of the Night, Death on the Installment Plan, London Bridge, North, Rigadoon, Conversations with Professor Y, Castle to Castle, and Normance.

Ralph Manheim (b. New York, 1907) was an American translator of German and French literature. His translating career began with a translation of Mein Kempf in which Manheim set out to reproduce Hitler's idiosyncratic, often grammatically aberrant style. In collaboration with John Willett, Manheim translated the works of Bertolt Brecht. The Pen/Ralph Manheim Medal for translation, inaugurated in his name, is a major lifetime achievement award in the field of translation. He himself won its predecessor, the PEN translation prize, in 1964. Manheim died in Cambridge in 1992. He was 85.

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North 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Celine's latter trilogy, North, Castle to Castle, and Rigadoon, rarely shares the prestige and canonical airplay of his more 'sober' work of Voyage a bout de la nuit. North's mass agglomerations of ellipses that shore up puctive, raving prose furnishes us with the inner workings of a man ravaged by the vicissitudes of the collabo witchhunt during the fallout of WWII. North, like the other two titles in his trilogy, is an engaging read with a constant flow of breathless emphasis. It surely stands out as one of the more courageously maniacal texts of the 20th century, and is deserving of much more study beyond the small klatch of Celine enthusiasts. It is in North where we come to witness Celine's mastery of coordinating action sequences with several bodies, in a kind of complex literary ballet that rhizomally unfolds and ferries across the rhapsody of the situation of which he gives reportage.