Nostromo

Nostromo

by Joseph Conrad
3.9 19

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Overview

Nostromo by Joseph Conrad

Nostromo: A Tale of the Seaboard is a novel of great political and psychological importance in modern literature. Set in the fictional South American nation of Costaguana – a land wracked by war and revolution – Conrad paints a mesmerizing portrait of man’s vulnerability to greed and corruption. Through a unique narrative style and vivid characterization, Conrad delves into an account of human frailty with an ironic twist; it is a story without heroes.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780140020625
Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date: 03/25/1976
Pages: 464
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 5.00(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

About The Author
Polish-British author Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) settled in England and gained citizenship in 1886. Although he is considered one of the greatest English-language authors of his time, Conrad did not speak English fluently until he was in his twenties.
He joined the British merchant marine and was granted British nationality. His prose was masterful. He wrote stories and novels, many based on his nautical experience, depicting trials of the human spirit.
Conrad's work is considered early modernist with elements of 19th-century realism. His narrative style has influenced many authors including F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, André Malraux, George Orwell, Graham Greene, Gabriel García Márquez, John le Carré, V. S. Naipaul, and Salman Rushdie. Many films have been adapted from, or inspired by, Conrad's works.
Conrad drew on his native Poland's national experiences and his experiences in the French and British merchant navies, to create novels that reflect aspects of a European-dominated world-including imperialism and colonialism. About The Author

Date of Birth:

December 3, 1857

Date of Death:

August 3, 1924

Place of Birth:

Berdiczew, Podolia, Russia

Place of Death:

Bishopsbourne, Kent, England

Education:

Tutored in Switzerland. Self-taught in classical literature. Attended maritime school in Marseilles, France

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Nostromo 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Livingstone More than 1 year ago
I really struggled to get through this book. I mean really, really struggled. Whereas I can usually get through a book this size in about 10 days, it took a month and was highly unenjoyable for the first half. Now I really didn't like Heart of Darkness to begin with, but this story is completely written differently. In that book as well as Lord Jim, Conrad uses Marlow as a narrator who tells a progressive, linear story. I hear that Nostromo is written in a way similar to Ulysses, In Search of Lost Time, and To The Lighthouse in that it is not a flowing, chronological story--but a sting of scenes that appear in an order that has no rhyme or reason. It's supposed to be part of the "fun" for the reader to piece together, but I found it difficult when the author digresses to something that happened who knows when in relation to the main plot. The characters were also hard to form a picture of as Conrad refers to each one with several different names. Nostromo is also known as Capataz de Cargodores and Gran Battista--none of which are his actual name! And the way the author uses words from French, Italian and Spanish is also confusing, but the B&N Classics edition is good at providing footnotes. All of this notwithstanding, the basic plot is a good one. It has a moral and a powerful tone. Among the redeeming qualities, it compares the incorruptible, pristine silver to the "incorruptible" Nostromo (who barely appears in the novel until the latter half). At the end of the novel (a few pages from the finish), there is an exchange between said main character that did bring tears to my eyes and a sympathy to a seemingly incorruptible man. The message of the book is timeless, and that's why I suspect this is hailed as one of the best of all time--though I considered it a tough read. Conrad considered it something, but not what he was hoping for. I agree, but I'm glad I read it. Conrad was rushed by his publisher and even had to have Ford Maddox Ford help him with the manuscript (thanks for an informative introduction Barnes and Noble). If one wishes to try their hand at reading this, I suggest not to get bogged down trying to keep track of all the characters or what's happening to whom--hang in there until Deccoud's letter to his sister (about halfway) and it will become much better.
Guest More than 1 year ago
NOSTROMO was a long book to get through - I had to stop a few times to look up a word in the dictionary, but it was a fascinating story that sparked me into critical thought. However, this is not a book for someone looking for a quick literary revelation, so to speak. Even as an advanced placement (AP) English student in the middle of my senior high school year, it took patience and concentration to get drawn into this book. But once that was done, the richness of the characters, the descriptive narratives, intricate symbolism, and enlightening themes drew me into the author's mind. And having finished NOSTROMO, it would almost be an understatement to say that Conrad must have been brilliant. If you absorb this book with all of its essential elements, it is absolutely incredible what lessons you can learn for your life just from the pages.
Atthebeach More than 1 year ago
Decided to read Nostromo when I read that F. Scott Fitzgerald said if he could have written any book, it would be Nostromo. High praise. I think if Fitzgerald had written it, it would have been at least 100 pages shorter. It is high literature. The writing is colorful and even elegiac at times. There pages and pages of description without any action. And chapters and chapters of dialogue without action. It takes a very long time to get into the plot or even know what it is. But I knew I was reading something great and kept going. The first half was very slow. The third quarter started to fill out the story. And the last quarter tells the whole of the story. By the end, I was very happy that I stayed with it. The characters, once totally revealed, the full story, once totally told, are grand. The ending is far beyond imagining. It takes some patience, but it is very worth the read.  
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I didn't finish the book. The characters were two-dimensional, the exposition difficult to follow, and the premise disappointing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Smiles
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lays around boredly