Not I: Memoirs of a German Childhood

Not I: Memoirs of a German Childhood

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Overview

Not I: Memoirs of a German Childhood by Joachim Fest

One of the New York Times Books Review's 100 Notable Books of 2014!

A portrait of an intellectually rigorous German household opposed to the Nazis and how its members suffered for their political stance

Few writers have deepened our understanding of the Third Reich as much as German historian, biographer, journalist, and critic Joachim Fest. His biography of Adolf Hitler has reached millions of readers around the world. Born in 1926, Fest experienced firsthand the rise of the Nazis, the Second World War, and a catastrophically defeated Germany, thus becoming a vital witness to these difficult years.

In this memoir of his childhood and youth, Fest offers a far-reaching view of how he experienced the war and National Socialism. True to the German Bildung tradition, Fest grows up immersed in the works of Goethe, Schiller, Mörike, Rilke, Kleist, Mozart, and Beethoven. His father, a conservative Catholic teacher, opposes the Nazi regime and as a result loses his job and status. Fest is forced to move to a boarding school in the countryside that he despises, and in his effort to come to terms with his father’s strong political convictions, he embarks on a tireless quest for knowledge and moral integrity that will shape the rest of his life and writing career.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781590516102
Publisher: Other Press, LLC
Publication date: 02/11/2014
Pages: 464
Sales rank: 782,986
Product dimensions: 5.60(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Joachim Fest was one of the most important authors and historians of the Federal Republic of Germany. From 1963 he worked as chief editor of Norddeutscher Rundfunk (North German Broadcasting), and from 1973 to 1993 as editor of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. His biography Hitler (1974) has been translated into more than twenty languages. His other works include Inside Hitler’s Bunker (2005), Speer: The Final Verdict (2002), and Plotting Hitler’s Death (1996).
 
Herbert A. Arnold holds a PhD from the University of Würzburg and is a professor emeritus of German and Letters at Wesleyan University.
 
Martin Chalmers’s recent translations include Summer Resort by Esther Kinsky and Brussels, the Gentle Monster: or the Disenfranchisement of Europe by Hans Magnus Enzensberger. In 2004 he was awarded the Schlegel-Tieck Prize for The Lesser Evil, his translation of the post-1945 diaries of Victor Klemperer.

Read an Excerpt

In early 1936, from our place by the wall, Wolfgang and I eavesdropped on a rare argument between our parents. There had been a strangely irritable atmosphere all day. My mother evidently started it, reminding my father in a few short sentences what she had put up with, politically and personally, in the last three years. She said she wasn’t complaining, but she had never dreamt of such a future. From morning to night she was standing in front of pots, pans, and washboards, and when the day was over she had to attend to the torn clothes of the children, patched five times over. And then, after what seemed like a hesitant pause, she asked whether my father did not, after all, want to reconsider joining the Party. The gentlemen from the education authority had called twice in the course of the year to persuade him to give way; at the last visit they had even held out the prospect of rapid promotion. In any case, she couldn’t cope anymore…And to indicate the end of her plea, after a long pause she added a simple “Please!”

My father replied a little too wordily (as I sometimes thought in the years to come), but at the same time revealed how uneasy he had been about the question for a long time. He said something about the readjustments that she, like many others, had been forced to make. He spoke about habit, which after often difficult beginnings provides a certain degree of stability. He spoke about conscience and trust in God. Also that he himself, as well as my brothers and I, could gradually relieve her of some of the work in the household, and so on. But my mother insisted on an answer, suggesting that joining the Party would not change anything: “After all, we remain who we are!” It did not take long for my father to retort: “Precisely not! It would change everything!”

Table of Contents

Introduction xi

Preface xxi

1 How Everything Came Together 1

2 The World Falls Apart 31

3 Even If All Others Do… 71

4 Don't Ever Become Sentimental! 106

5 Leave-takings 151

6 Alien Worlds 187

7 Friends and Foes 223

8 Of the Soldier's Life and of Dying 258

9 The Escape 297

10 Not Home Yet 333

11 Retrospect and a Brief Look Ahead 381

Postscript 413

Index 415

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Not I: Memoirs of a German Childhood 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think I was expecting more information about what the author experienced during the Nazi years but this book did not deliver. There were endless passages about music and philosophy but very little about the key events such as how his father managed to help his Jewish friends escape or what the author did when he was drafted. Perhaps I didn't read the reviews closely enough before I purchased this book but it was not for me.
dgslx More than 1 year ago
I read the German edition and bought the English text to read with friends. The translation is excellent and the introduction , footnotes and index are a great additions to a book that mixes personal experiences under Hitler with sharp observations into evil.