The Novels of Tiger and Del, Volume I

The Novels of Tiger and Del, Volume I

by Jennifer Roberson

Paperback(Omnibus)

$16.00
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Overview

He was Tiger, born of the desert winds, raised as a slave and winning his freedom by weaving a special kind of magic with a warrior's skill. She was Del, born of ice and storm, trained by the greatest of Northern sword masters. Together, they discover a kinship and friendship that grows to love while facing dangers of both sword and sorcery.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780756403195
Publisher: DAW
Publication date: 02/07/2006
Series: Sword-Dancer Series
Edition description: Omnibus
Pages: 688
Sales rank: 525,677
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.60(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Jennifer Roberson is the author of the Sword-Dancer Saga and the Chronicles of the Cheysuli, and collaborated with Melanie Rawn and Kate Elliott on the historical fantasy The Golden Key, a finalist for the World Fantasy Award. She has also published three historical novels, and several in other genres. An exhibitor and breeder of Cardigan Welsh Corgis, she lives on acreage in Northern Arizona with eight dogs and two cats. She is currently working on the third Karavans novel, with prologue available at her website, http://www.cheysuli.com/author/Index.html.

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The Novels of Tiger and Del, Volume I 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this six book series years ago and still find it one of the most engaging tales I've come across.
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JasonOsmond More than 1 year ago
I'll keep the synopsis short: Sandtiger ("Tiger" to his friends), is a "sword-dancer", that is, a professional swordsman, who makes his living against other swordsmen in the circle, for fun, money, or to the death. He's engaged by a northern woman, Del, herself a sword-dancer, to guide her across the desert, on an errand she only knows. Both characters have pasts that they are ashamed to reveal, but continue to mark their lives in various ways, and the book(s) is the story of their journeys together and how they both come to grips with their histories and with each other.

The plot is pretty good. But oh, the dialogue! These people talk. A lot. Something happens to the main characters, and they have spend two pages talking about how it affects them. Then they have spend two or three more pages talking about their past, and how it relates to what just happened. Then they spend a page or two talking about each other. They move on, go somewhere else, next plot point, rinse and repeat. If the narrator (Tiger) doesn't have anyone else to talk to, he talks to himself. This book is one part plot, and ten parts of character discussion. And it's repetitive dialogue, rarely is anything insightful or new discussed, it's just the same things with slight variations, hashed out over and over again. I find myself often skimming pages at a time of dialogue, trying to get to a point where someone finally shuts up and does something to advance the plot, knowing that if I miss anything, they'll just repeat it again later. And even then, they'll often talk while in the midst of fighting for their lives.

There's a good story in here, but the sheer wordiness of the telling is punishing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Very indepth characters, at least the main charcters and their main antagonist per book. It's written from first person perspective. Usually I don't read those type of books however, this was thoroughly enjoyable. There's action, romance, history, sadness, magic, and suspence. I liked the way that Sword-Singer ended but then I hated it. Read it for yourself to find out what I mean. By the way if you are one of those people who read a few chapters in the begining and the end then don't pick this book up because you need the entire story to understand the book.