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Now That We're Men: A Play and True Life Accounts of Boys, Sex & Power

Now That We're Men: A Play and True Life Accounts of Boys, Sex & Power

Paperback

$19.95
Available for Pre-Order. This item will be available on January 7, 2020

Overview

Following up Slut, her explosive 2015 play and guidebook for combating sexism and sexual violence, Katie Cappiello turns her perceptive eyes and ears to the lived experiences of young men as they try on sexuality and masculinity. Compassionate and piercingly insightful, this play and guidebook razes rape culture, interrogates traditional notions of masculinity, and breeds accountability—without sacrificing boys. The guidebook contains the play, an activist guide, and raw dispatches from teenagers and young men.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781948340182
Publisher: Dottir Press
Publication date: 01/07/2020
Pages: 312
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x (d)
Age Range: 11 - 18 Years

About the Author

Katie Cappiello is an award-winning theater creator and acting teacher specializing in Method-based technique training. Katie has addressed The White House and The US Department of State to speak about the power of theater arts as a tool for policy and cultural change. Her plays include SLUT: The Play, Keep Your Eyes Open, Facebook Me, A Day in the Life, and Her Story: Uncut. Katie's been honored by dozens of organizations for her work using theatre as a space for young people to tell the truth about their lives and engage in community building and transformation and her plays have been performed around the world. Her original series Grand Army will debut on Netflix in early 2020.

Marquis Rodriguez is an actor, teacher, and long-time collaborator with Cappiello. He is a star of Ava DuVernay's series When They See Us, about the Central Park 5 and the forthcoming Game of Thrones prequel. As a child, he portrayed Simba in The Lion King on Broadway.

Dominic Fumusa is an actor on Broadway, television, and film. He is best known for his role as Kevin Peyton in the series Nurse Jackie.

Read an Excerpt

Andrew: You saw it?

Nick: What do you mean?

Andrew: You saw the picture of Liz?

Nick: Well, yeah.

Andrew: How?

Nick: Someone sent it to me.

Andrew: Who?

Nick: Why does it matter?

Andrew: I wanna know.

Nick: Evan.

Andrew: What?!

Nick: Yeah.

Andrew: Who sent it to him?

Nick: I don’t know, man. It’s just making the rounds, you know?

Andrew: How can you say that so casually?

Nick: Because it is casual!

Andrew: It’s not.

Nick: Man, she sent it to him !

Andrew: Meaning what?

Nick: Meaning your sister that you’re so worried about took off her fucking shirt and took a pic, and then she sent it to Ted. She knew what she was doing, man.

Andrew: She didn’t know he would share it with, like, the world.

Nick: How could she not have known that?

Andrew: I one hundred percent do not think she knew he was gonna do that.

Nick: Okay, well, ignorance isn’t an excuse.

Andrew: What?!

Nick: Just ’cause she may claim she didn’t know what he would do—which I still don’t believe—doesn’t mean she’s exempt from the reality...the consequences or whatever. She sent something to him. Then it became his. And he did what he wanted with it. She put it out there. She made a choice.

Andrew: She Snapchatted it!

Nick: Right, and he took a screenshot. Sorry. She knows people do that.

Andrew: Why is it on her?!

Nick: Because she made the initial move. She wanted Ted to pay attention to her so she— (Andrew grabs him.)

Andrew: Shut the fuck up.

Nick: Yo! (Trying to push Andrew off of him and looking around at his fellow riders.)

Andrew: He’s the one who did the fucked up thing, though. (Really up in his face and shaking him.)

Nick: Dude, stop, we’re on the train.

Andrew: I don’t give a fuck.

Nick: Come on, you’re embarrassing yourself—

Andrew: You have her picture on your phone right now?

Nick: Seriously, stop grabbing me like this—

Andrew: Do you?

Nick: Yes.

Andrew: You’re a fucking bad friend. Delete it now.