Nowhere Man: The Final Days of John Lennon

Nowhere Man: The Final Days of John Lennon

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Overview

Nowhere Man: The Final Days of John Lennon by Robert N. Rosen


Each chapter of Nowhere Man offers a glimpse into different aspects of Lennon's life, including John’s relationship with Yoko, parenthood, drug use, and his pseudoscientific, esoteric and religious forays. The portrait that emerges is a life during a time of turmoil that is just reaching creative renewal, only to be cut short by an act of delusional violence.

Rosen’s work reveals a very human side of this beloved cultural icon, giving the reader a compelling account of John’s solitary struggle to create a meaningful life in the glaring spotlight of fame. The addition of photos throughout the book places the reader in Lennon’s environs, adding a strong visual dimension.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780932551511
Publisher: Quick Trading Company
Publication date: 08/28/2002
Edition description: FIRST
Pages: 225
Product dimensions: 5.36(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.62(d)

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Nowhere Man: The Final Days of John Lennon 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
...and the author does just that. This wonderful book shows a real person existed under the Johnandyoko media manipulations. A must read for any serious John, Beatle or rock culture fan.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Numerous books and countless articles have been written about the Beatles and every single member of the group. Was there still a possibility left to discover new aspects of John Lennon's life? Didn't we know it all about the man who brought us songs like 'Good Day Sunshine', 'Imagine' and 'Yellow Submarine'? The answer has to be no. Robert Rosen's new book 'Nowhere Man. The final Days of John Lennon' shows the former leader of the famous music quartet from a very different,intimate viewpoint. Rosen focuses on Lennon's inner life, his private self that existed far away from the public eye. He portrays a man who is pushed back and forth between the disciplined life of a yogi and the more ordinary pleasures and vices of an aging human being and celebrity; a man who had lost toucht with the world and himself. Like other depressed people Lennon's daily schedule was dominated by the minor tasks and challenges that had become the center of his existence. His universe evolved around juice fasts, dream journals, his appearance and horoscopes. Long gone were the heights of creativity, no reading and no meditation could bring them back and smoking grass didn't help either. The John Lennon of the late seventies and early eighties observed New York from the windows of the Dakota: down there in Central Park the real life was happening, up in the rooms of the Dakota superstition and paranoia had taken over. We learn a lot from this book about how the Lennons lived, how they hired and fired their service people, how they raised their son, which books John read etc. But mostly we learn from these pages the story of a desperate man who thought he had nowhere to go anymore and who because his life was tragically taken from him never got a second chance to find out differently.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Unlike the hatchet jobs done by Albert Goldman and Geoffrey Giuliano, this is a very even handed and compassionate look at John's final years. There is a lot of negative sentiment regarding this book from Beatle fans who haven't even read this author's work. It presents an artist at a crossroads in his life - creatively, philosophically and physically. John had given up the one gift that provided his life with direction, and he's grasping at anything that will stimulate his creative mind. He is shown as a human being with insecurities and faults just like everyone else. He was a Beatle; he wasn't perfect. Beatle fans, don't cheat yourself by not reading this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great companion book to Fred Seaman's book. Both books are based on recollections of the fabled diaries that went missing when John Lennon died and for the most part, paint a haunting and surprising portrait of the last year's in the life of this musical genius. John Lennon fans that believe the Yolo Ono manufactured myth of a saint whose only want and need in life was world peace will be utterly dissappear by the description of a human being with all the needs wants and fears a normal man would have. Above everything he achieved in his life, John Lennon was a man that like everyone else in the world, is imperfect. It's what made his music so universal. He felt what we all felt and these books make the man surface above the myth.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I kept thinking that it can't be true. I kept wanting it to just be another sleazy tabloid cover story. But it wasn't. With the ghost's of Lennon's personal journals pushing his pen, Rosen sculpts scathingly honest insights into Lennon's habits, haunts and musical hiatus. The book kept me flipping pages, learning more and more about the man I thought I knew. Too bad 'The Perfect Storm' is already the title of a book - Rosen's tome thunders!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a fabulous book--a real page turner. The intimate details about Lennon's day to day life in those last years is really something special. The book is very funny throughout, and of course, finally very sad. I enjoyed the way the author chose to end the book. And I liked the interweaving of the astrological forecasts, numerology information throughout, and all the contradictions of spirituality and materialism. The entire book seemed to be written with a delicate touch, even though we were seeing into more than one person's inner world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book really gets inside Lennon's head as no 'traditional biography' ever could. Just as fascinating as Lennon's Dakota days is the story of the author and how he came upon his material. Nancy Reagon and her astrologer has nothing on that control freak Y
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wow! As a former president of a large Beatles' fan club and a serious-minded scholar of the group once known as the Fab Four (paying particular attention to John Lennon), this book outdoes, outshines and outperforms all others ever written on the undisputed genius who was Lennon. That it shatters myths and sheds light on areas we may not want to have illuminated, and that it does so unstintingly in spare, intriguing prose, only makes this tome more astonishing. Kudos to Robert Rosen for his bravery, his masterful style and his unerring intelligence. A must-must read for anyone interested in one of the 20th century's most enigmatic men. Rosen deserves a Pulitzer!