Nox Dormienda (A Long Night for Sleeping)

Nox Dormienda (A Long Night for Sleeping)

by Kelli Stanley
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Nox Dormienda (A Long Night for Sleeping) 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In Nox Dormienda, Kelli Stanley brings Roman Britain in the first century A.D. to life with deft writing and deep knowledge of the times. The story follows half-Roman, half-Briton Arcturus, physician and informal investigator to the Roman governor Agricola, as he delves into the death of a shady merchant. The trail creeps through Londinium's seedy underbelly, shining a light in dark corners from the lowliest prostitute's crib to the highest seats of Roman power. The setting is crisply-drawn, the characters rich and engaging, and the mystery tight and enthralling, with Arcturus' wry humor and keen observations leading the way through this gritty page- turner. If you enjoy classic noir, or you enjoy your mystery with a classical setting, you won't be disappointed. It may be A Long Night for Sleeping, but don't plan on any sleep until you finish this gem.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 83 AD Londinium, doctor Julius ¿Arcturus¿ Favonianus learns from widow Claudia ¿Gwyna¿ Catussa that his prime employer and friend Britannia Governor, Agricola is in trouble with Roman Emperor Domitian. Apparently the Emperor has sent fat avaricious Syrian Vibius Maecenas with papers demanding Agricola to resign. Gwyna further explains that the odious Syrian freeman is her sponsus.It was arranged by her dying father for her to marry the pig she will kill herself before she allows him to impregnate her. --- After she leaves, Arcturus sends his servant Bilicho to follow her. Not long after that, the Romans arrive to escort Arcturus to a hidden forbidden temple where Maecenas is dead looking like a ghastly imitation of Mithras slaying the bull. Arcturus with Bilicho to assist investigates the homicide that could lead to civil war between the Roman legion and the British even as he is attracted to the prime suspect Gwyna. --- Although the resolution is weak fans of ancient historical mysteries will enjoy this entertaining Britannia Noir as Arcturus escorts the audience to places not normally found in Roman Empire whodunits. Little things like a Roman name and a native name enhances a sense of time and place. The story line is fast-paced from the moment the soldiers take the lead character to the crime scene and never slows down as he investigates the homicide while fearing if he takes too long to resolve, hostilities will turn ugly. NOX DORMIENDA is an enjoyable first century amateur sleuth. --- Harriet Klausner
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ms. Stanley signed a ARC for me at BEA in Los Angeles, so I'm lucky to have read it before it hits the stores. Simply put, this book will keep you up at night. Arctutus is a fascinating character. I don't want to spoil it, but fasten your seatbelt and hang on. Nox will take deep into a world you've never seen, or even knew exsited. Kudos, Ms. Stanley. I'm a fan for life!
Guest More than 1 year ago
...and they decide to write a novel together. If they did, this would certainly be the result. Kelli Stanley calls her book Roman Noir and she has definitely captured the Noir voice here. Arcturus has the perfect world-weary tone, slightly cynical but deep down wanting to believe in the very people he mistrusts. In the course of his investigation, he even crosses paths with a beautiful femme fatale who may or may not be aiding his investigation with her cryptic clues and seductive gazes. In Nox Dormienda (A Long Night for Sleeping), Arcturus investigates the murder of Vibius Maecenas, a Syrian merchant who was carrying a message for Agricola, Roman Governor of Britain and Arcturus' mentor. The mystery is well-paced and kept me guessing right up to the end. Kelli Stanley brings Roman London to life with her vivid descriptions of life at the time, and I enjoyed the liberal peppering of Latin phrases throughout.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was lucky enough to get a copy of the ARC of this book, and I echo the sentiments of writer Ken Bruen, who quoted 'it nigh cost me a night's sleep!'. The first Roman mystery I've read that is so immediate I didn't realize I was reading a historical. Raymond Chandler's my favorite writer, and this has a similar literary, visceral style. I'm psyched that this will be a series!