Number9Dream

Number9Dream

by David Mitchell
3.9 26

NOOK Book(eBook)

$12.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Number9Dream 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
cloggiedownunder More than 1 year ago
“Dreams are shores where the ocean of spirit meets the land of matter. Beaches where the yet-to-be, the once-were, the will-never-be may walk amid the still-are” number9dream is the second novel by British author, David Mitchell. Nineteen-year-old Eiji Miyake arrives in Tokyo looking for his father, a man he has never met, a man whose name he does not even know. He has a letter from a lawyer warning him not to try to find his father, so his first move is to stake out the lawyer’s office from a café opposite, the Jupiter Café, where works a girl with the most beautiful neck in the world. So begins another foray into the world of David Mitchell, one that takes the reader on an interesting (and occasionally, slightly bizarre) journey. As Eiji moves from the café to the Lost Property Office of Ueno station to a game parlour to an unfinished development on reclaimed land to a safe house to a video shop to a pizza shop to a mountain retreat, he also moves in and out of danger and encounters quite a cast of (often quirky) individuals. Claude Debussy and John Lennon play significant roles, as do the Yakuza organised crime syndicate, an overabundance of cigarettes, some seriously weird pizza recipes, a cat, an absent mother and a dead twin sister. Mitchell manages to seamlessly include the journal of a WW2 Kaiten pilot, scenes from a surreal black and white movie, a fantastic tale starring a stuttering goatwriter, a hen and a Pithecanthropus, an account of sex slavery and organ theft, and, of course, quite a few dreams. The number nine and its elements, unsurprisingly, feature heavily but in quite a subtle way. As with all of Mitchell’s novels, there are characters who appear in earlier and later books. Mitchell’s characters, for all their oddities, are appealing; their dialogue and Eiji’s inner monologue provide plenty of humour; and they manage to express some insightful observations: “Weird. All these people like my mother paying counsellors and clinics to reattach them to reality; all these people like me paying Sony and Sega to reattach us to unreality” and “Maybe the truest difference between people is exactly this: how they see why they are here” also “Maybe the meaning of life lies in looking for it”. The (perhaps) abrupt ending that leaves things very much “up in the air” may not be to every reader’s taste, but the characters, plot and prose more than compensate, especially the delightful feast of rhyme, alliteration and incredibly clever wordplay of the goatwriter piece. An excellent read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the best book i've ever read! It has everything needful to be no1 bestseller! GREAT! I can stronly recommend #9dream!
Anonymous 10 months ago
I stopped reading part way in. Too jumbled. A "modern" book where I can't tell what the point is. But then I came back to it. Gradually a story sorted itself out, one that kept me going to the end. The end itself is an irksome cliffhanger.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent characterization. Universal themes. Conflicts with which all can identify. Challenging enough that it does not give you everything in one reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
FocoProject More than 1 year ago
There are books that hook you, grip you and will not let you go until you finish them and this one is one of those, falling in the category of Mitchell¿s Cloud Atlas and Atwood¿s Oryx & Crake, and though thematically they are different, they all have that engrossing quality to them. Needless to say, I am quickly becoming a David Mitchell fan, who has batted two out of two for me with amazing skill.

Like Cloud Atlas, Number 9 Dream was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize, unlike Cloud Atlas, this book is a lot more accessible, with a straight forward storyline that does employ a number of flashbacks and side stories to set itself up, but done in a way that is easy to follow and rather entertaining.

Based in japan, Number 9 Dream tells the story of Eiji Miyake, a young man of twenty with an overactive imagination that is determined to find his father, whom he has never met, in Tokyo. Having suffered enough as far as his family life goes, Eiji is sure that finding his father will be the first step to a better life, or at least a life that he will have an easier time understanding. However, what the young aspiring soccer player and country boy does not know, is that in his search for father, he will be tugged into the ruthless underbelly of Tokyo in a way that will change his life forever, not to mention his point of view in the meaning of family.

Mitchell impresses, with a voice that is clearly in control, characters that are unique, believable and interesting, though they may or may not be likable. Throughout the novel the author does a magnificent job balancing, suspense, thrills, fantasies and humor. If anything, this book ended up reminding me of my experience reading Catche in the Rye, and that is a tremendous compliment.

There is one minor plot point which I found too convenient and given the complexity and the multiple layers that Mitchell operates in, it sticks out like a sore thumb, which is unfortunate because it could have easily been changed to make it less obvious (for those wondering, I am speaking of Suga¿s gift). Outside of that, this is a fully entertaining read that keeps you hooked through the entirety of the read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the first book by David Mitchell I've read, and I know I'm going to read Ghostwritten and all that may follow. This chronicles Eiji Miyake and his twisted life. Mitchell did a great job intertwining many different stories within one book, while holding your attention the WHOLE way through. Spectacular reveries, mini-stories, and journals fill the pages along with Eiji's own life story. You won't regret reading this.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fantastic, in all senses of the word. As in Ghostwritten, Mitchell's smooth metaphors and unique observations constantly make you stop and think. This novel, like his first, hints at "a world within the world," as Delillo would say, and probably cannot be understood in a single reading. But it can be enjoyed for its touching and powerful story, with or without grasping the eerie subtext. His many allusions to Murakami are a bit more overt than in Ghostwritten -- he even has his lead character reading The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, with a key reference to a situation in that novel, and he uses the title of a John Lennon song for this book, as Murakami did with Norwegian Wood. Share this with friends. I can't wait for his next one.