Of Staves And Sigmas

Of Staves And Sigmas

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Overview

Of Staves And Sigmas by Geoffrey Verdegast, Chip Boles

James Wagner of earth. Voknor of Ergos. One man. Two names. Two worlds. Or are they? Even James Wagner himself cannot be sure. When a lifetime of increasingly tumultuous psychotic breaking is suddenly exacerbated by a new and inconceivable phenomenon of incorporeal shifting, he is literally forced to question the very ground upon which he strides. The wild, mediaevalesque visions that haunt and beckon him, the time and memory that are stripped away in ever-increasing blocks, the violent persona that out of nowhere commandeers his body and runs rampant and sometimes apparitionally in his absence-is Wagner losing his soul, or is he gaining another one, a darker one? Of Staves and Sigmas is a multi-levelled tale of dualism and destiny, a story of a conflicted man's descent into-and out of-a madness that spirits him to the impossibly familiar world of his mind's eye, a world that may in actuality be far more real than the phantasmal construct that he's always believed it to be.

From his earliest recollection, James Wagner possessed his own ilk of second sight. Living in one world, he was occasionally meted a vision or two of another place, another realm, where life was a canvas painted by an entirely different brush. Unable to suppress or frustrate these often violent visitations, Wagner instead inured himself to them, even as they became gradually more invasive and disruptive with each passing year. By the age of twenty-seven, he'd already been long in downward spiral-professionally, socially, holistically. Lost jobs, failed relationships, unfulfilled potential-anything that had ever held promise in his life was inevitably sabotaged by an inner chaos that, in its burgeoning insidiousness, had actually somehow manifested an alter ego, a crazed Other, who usurped the reins of Wagner's livelihood for hours at a time, turning an already disastrous existence into a danger to Wagner and to those around him.

Finding some small comfort under the institutional roof and wing of Dr. Jonathon Mazzio, head of the Howsley Centre for Mental Health, both men soon become chagrined and astounded by a phenomenon that refuses to subside, and that indeed begins devouring Wagner's subsistence with ever greater voracity. Only an unexpected, eleventh-hour visit from a wayward prophet bearing odd, mystical insight seems to shed light on Wagner's malady-and this, too late to affect or assuage it. From there, Wagner is well and unstoppably unto becoming Voknor; his earth, given up for Ergos, the world of his visions; and while the abandoned are left behind to ponder his fate, Wagner must contend with a severely archaic and draconian realm of strangely pre-gleaned convolution and culture, with denizens both multifarious and malfeasant, and a future already written in foresight, yet truly as ungraspable as the time he lost.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780983453901
Publisher: Geoffrey Verdegast
Publication date: 08/17/2011
Pages: 508
Product dimensions: 1.13(w) x 6.00(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

GEOFFREY VERDEGAST lived in Germany as a boy. Born to an American father and a German mother, his formative years were a complementary infusion of both cultures. Benefiting from many a family excursion along the richly historic Rhine and Mosel rivers, the innumerable treks across Deutschland's verdant countryside, and the illuminating explorations of the castles and the quaint villages of renaissance and mediaeval antiquity-the nuances of Europe's bygone days imprinted themselves indelibly upon his young mind. Drawing from this wealth of experience, Verdegast has crafted OF STAVES AND SIGMAS, a spirited tale of wit and wonder-and the first instalment in his SOULS OF ERGOS phantasy-adventure series. Thrusting his unwitting, contemporary protagonist into a violent, archaic, other-worldly culture, the author pits modern pragmatism against Old World mysticism, tests the epic concepts of trust, love, valour and tolerance, and re-examines the morals and mores that shape and influence all sentient beings.

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Of Staves and Sigmas 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read over two thousand novels in my life as a fiction fanatic. In that time I have never read a volume that the story was so distracted by the author's attempt to prove his command of the dictionary that I had trouble following the story line. The use of fabricated or actual word phrasing was so distracting that I had to put the novel down numerous times because I lost track of the story. After finally completing the novel I thought it had an excellent story line. The book was ruined for me by the overwhelming use of rarely used words and phrases continually throughout the entire novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
At first the wording seemed a bit heavy but the more i read the more i enjoyed it. Very well written, interesting characters and full of action.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Have you ever read Homer? The Iliad? Or the one that killed me in high school, Lord Jim? Of Staves and Sigmas is written in the style of classic literature and I couldn't have been more pleased. True, this self proclaimed long winded author goes into minute detail about everything, but does it in such a way as to be most entertaining to the reader. And do you like the flair of merry old England? At first I thought this work to be fraught with misspellings until the author was kind enough to enlighten me to the knowledge that there is an 'English' or 'British' way to spell words as well as the American way I grew up with. Once I realized that, this American set to with a vengeance. The premise of this book would at first seem cliched and standard old fare. Man from this world is inexplicable drawn to another. Why, my own work covers a variant of that as well. But in Mr. Verdegast's there is much more to it than that. James Wagner, or Voknor as he's known in the other world of Ergos, is part of something that in the first book of the series is still vague with only glimpses and tantalizing foreshadowings of what is to come. In the beginning he's in an psychiatric institute because of blackouts and strange behaviors which he refers to as benders. Be warned, the first several chapters are full of psychiatric mumbo jumbo, but it is necessary as it lays very important groundwork for what is to follow. Ever read The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant? And how you had to wade through about 30 pages of development before you get to the good stuff? Of Staves and Sigmas is sort of like that, only much more interesting. After all, Thomas Covenant didn't run through walls naked as a jay bird or sit in the middle of an office having a nonexistent cook-out while in the throes of one of his blackout sessions. Once he gets to Ergos, the action picks up as only a master storyteller could achieve. Never a wasted paragraph, everything either lays groundwork or moves the story along. I found myself at times reading the story, not for what was happening, but the way in which the author put the words together. I have to tell you, my own writing improved due to reading Mr. Verdegast's work. Character development is constant throughout the book. World building is intricate. Every character remains true to themselves throughout. None of this where in chapter one the author mentions a certain character is a Vegan only to have them eating roast beef in chapter ten. Very consistent. I can honestly say that I have not read a book like this since English Class in high school. The word use is at least 10th grade if not college level and the only problems I found with it were a few misplaced, or missing quotation marks. What a refreshing read after having read so many 'top of the genre fantasy books' written at grade school level. The ending of the book is all one could hope for. Heroics and battle, fighting and camaraderie, this book is sure to go down as one of the best written, and highly entertaining books of the first part of the Twenty First Century. The only downside to this book is that the rest of the series has yet to be written. But I have been assured by the author that the second installment is even now close to completion. On the upside, Of Staves and Sigmas doesn't end in a cliffhanger. True, events are in motion and you want to find out what happens, but you aren't left feeling like 'What? It's over? It CAN'T be over!!' because of plots left in mid-dangle. I wholeheartedly recommend this to any serious fantasy reader. Those looking for lighter fare may wish to search elsewhere. But for those who've been reading for years, and find that books being published by the main publishers all seem to read alike and are less than fulfilling, then for you, I say you must try Of Staves and Sigmas. You will not regret it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Split personality disorder. Perhaps this is the best way James Wagner can describe his life. Is he really James Wagner going mad or is he really Voknor of Ergos? The unexpected shifting of worlds and personalities plunges the reader into a world of terror where our hero, James Wagner, must face blood thirsty foes in his quest for sanity. To be brutally blunt, Of Staves and Sigmas is a hard read. The first part of the book reads more like a psychology book aimed at the college bound doctorate whose looking for strange and weird behavior types. The reader must plow through all this to get to where the ¿action is¿ and then we¿re still having to wade through descriptive narrative that would give most readers headaches. Is this book for the average reader of adventure science fiction? No. The book is probably geared more for the astute, analytical types who find deep intriguing character development a syntax for the real world. If you¿re looking for an adventure in the human pathos and conflicting psychological adventures, then read this book. Good luck, it might take you a while.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book crosses some genre barriers, going beyond what might be construed as typical fantasy, and touching upon a diverse combination of adventure, romance, para-psychology, philosophy, reluctant heroism, even time-travel! Verdegast, by his own admission, is versed in the classics --- and it shows but I think that he is equally versed in the culture of our own time, which he uses to juxtapose with a narrative that incorporates both the olden and the relevant. The first section of the novel is challenging, and slow to build. While we are provided many initial clues of what is to come, there are some technical and expository elements here that might stymie all but the most unflappable reader. But then the story REALLY takes off! Once Wagner 'the protagonist' escapes his earthly confines, we are swept along with him on a tumultuous, sensorial extravaganza of terror and humor, of blood-thirsty foes and honorable allies, of pathos and imagery that satisfies and yet still leaves the palate 'at least mine!' whetted for more. While it helps if the reader has a least a rudimentary knowledge of classic literature 'Verdegast makes many a reference to Greek myths and other earthly lore', this book can nevertheless be enjoyed by anyone seeking an intelligent tale with refreshing and eclectic characters, and a plot that veers happily and circuitously beyond more common fare.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book crosses some genre barriers, going beyond what might be construed as typical fantasy, and touching upon a diverse combination of adventure, romance, para-psychology, philosophy, reluctant heroism, even time-travel! Verdegast, by his own admission, is versed in the classics --- and it shows but I think that he is equally versed in the culture of our own time, which he uses to juxtapose with a narrative that incorporates both the olden and the relevant. The first section of the novel is challenging, and slow to build. While we are provided many initial clues of what is to come, there are some technical and expository elements here that might stymie all but the most unflappable reader. But then the story REALLY takes off! Once Wagner 'the protagonist' escapes his earthly confines, we are swept along with him on a tumultuous, sensorial extravaganza of terror and humor, of blood-thirsty foes and honorable allies, of pathos and imagery that satisfies and yet still leaves the palate 'at least mine!' whetted for more. While it helps if the reader has a least a rudimentary knowledge of classic literature 'Verdegast makes many a reference to Greek myths and other earthly lore', this book can nevertheless be enjoyed by anyone seeking an intelligent tale with refreshing and eclectic characters, and a plot that veers happily and circuitously beyond more common fare.