The Officers' Club

The Officers' Club

by Ralph Peters
3.9 18

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Overview

The Officers' Club by Ralph Peters

Spring, 1981. Vietnam is over, but the repercussions linger. The military strives to recover as society reels from the excesses of the 1970s…

A sinister beauty and a dutiful soldier… a Hollywood lawyer running from a dirty past and a cast-off vet who seems to have no future… dueling drug gangs along the Mexican border… and the mutilated remains of a female lieutenant.

Stunning, promiscuous, and brilliant at spotting the weaknesses in others, Jessie Lamoureaux may have been killed by a jealous lover, a drug smuggler—or a ghost from a life she hoped she had left behind.

Was her murderer the Green Beret she betrayed? The captain whose marriage she shattered? The senior officer hoping to save her from herself? A female sergeant fighting for dignity in a man's world? Or a fellow lieutenant with a secret of his own?

In this gritty tale of young men and women torn between the laws of the land and the laws of the heart, a dark journey leads from a moonlit beach in Mexico to mayhem in Iran—then back to a country looking for its soul.

The Officers' Club captures the passions and confusion of the times, the reckoning due after a decade of indulgence—and the commitment of those who stayed in uniform through the bad years.

As the military and society struggle to right themselves, their conflicts are embodied in the question:

Who killed Lieutenant Jessie Lamoureux?



At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781429934749
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 01/18/2011
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 298,995
File size: 318 KB

About the Author

Ralph Peters is a retired Army lieutenant colonel and former enlisted man, a controversial strategist and veteran of the intelligence world; a bestselling, prize-winning novelist; a journalist who has covered multiple conflicts and appears frequently in the broadcast media; and a lifelong traveler with experience in over seventy countries on six continents. A widely read columnist, Ralph Peters' journalism has appeared in dozens of newspapers, magazines and web-zines, including The New York Post, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The Washington Post, Newsweek, Harpers, and Armchair General Magazine. His books include The War After Armageddon, Endless War, and Red Army. Peters grew up in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, and studied writing at Pennsylvania State University. He lives and writes in the Washington, D.C. area.


Ralph Peters is a retired Army lieutenant colonel and former enlisted man, a controversial strategist and veteran of the intelligence world; a bestselling, prize-winning novelist; a journalist who has covered multiple conflicts and appears frequently in the broadcast media; and a lifelong traveler with experience in over seventy countries on six continents. A widely read columnist, Ralph Peters' journalism has appeared in dozens of newspapers, magazines and web-zines, including The New York Post, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, the Washington Post, Newsweek, Harpers, and Armchair General Magazine. His books include The Officers’ Club, The War After Armageddon, Endless War, and Red Army. Peters grew up in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, and studied writing at Pennsylvania State University. He lives and writes in the Washington, D.C. area.

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The Officers' Club 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
CBH More than 1 year ago
I was beginning to think that this book was all about sex with no plot but after a few chapters a storyline began that did draw me into "The Officers' Club". Roy Banks is a Second Lieutenant in the army. He lives on base and was very dismayed when a CID agent came to his door to ask Roy questions regarding the death of a very promiscuous female officer who had made advances to almost everyone at the base. Roy told the agent he had no interest in Jessica Lamoureaux despite her many attempts to seduce him. All Roy could think of was his love and physical attraction to Nikki. The location of the base was very near the Mexican border, allowing the military access to Mexico when they had down time. They all knew it was dangerous but some disregarded the danger for the excitement of the drinking and sex available. The story now shifted back in time with Roy and Nikki and their fascination for each other. Nikki was married but she still wanted to have as much time and sex with Roy that was possible. Roy knew she had a commitment to her husband but he was enjoying her as often as he could. The various officers of the base would go to the Officers Club in Mexico to get their minds off of routine things when they became too tightly wound up in their work. Roy Banks was very much into physical fitness with weights and running. He would run until his body would rebel to the point of hurting. Roy was asked to plot out a hard set of maneuvers for the grunts. Roy knew the program he was developing was exceptionally hard and doubted most of those participating would be able to complete it but he was told not to make it easy-so he didn't! Roy was friendly with other officers near his rank and would do some things with them during their down time including some Mexican runs, a few in his old Mustang car. Top down, fresh air, sexy women, and fast speeds were a part of these trips that usually ended with many of them drunk. Nikki loved those trips. A wife of one of the officers was very attractive and she had eyes for Roy as well as Roy for her but she was married to a fellow officer so was off bounds to him. Marilyn was a temptation but nothing doing for Roy. In a nearby town Roy met Eli Lemberger who had set up a small shop where he sold old vinyl recordings. Roy was a collector of this type of music and he started spending more time at Eli's store, eventually sharing some tavern time together as well as time at Eli's home. Eli was gay but he knew Roy had no interest in him romantically but they both loved their time together enjoying music and drinks. Roy and Nikki continued their lovemaking as often as they could until Nikki had some personal problems and decided to return to her husband. This devastated Roy but despite his misgivings she would not change her mind. In the military associating between officers and non-commissioned officers was a strict taboo. It was out of the question. Enter into the scene, Staff Sergeant Mary Jane Munro, a non-commissioned officer and off limits to Roy-or until they found a way to sneak around and become very active with each other. The two of them really fell for each other but in both minds they knew it could not last but why not enjoy each other while possible? As you can see, the story did get off the strictly sex subjects and into other fields all of which made the book more interesting. Yes, I like sexual parts in books but not 100% of a story on the subject. In
Rob_Ballister More than 1 year ago
Ralph Peters' THE OFFICERS' CLUB is a tale of sex, deception, and tested loyalties in the post-Vietnam army. Lieutenant Jessie Lamoureaux is beautiful, sexy, and excels at ruining the lives of others. But when she turns up brutally murdered, a story unfolds involving a nymphomaniac, a lying pretty-boy, a goofy dullard, and an Italian pretty boy, all of whom happen to be US Army officers. Toss in two drug lords and a gay ex-lawyer jazz fanatic, and you have an exciting, incredibly unique story that is difficult to put down. The hero of the story is Lieutenant Banks, an older than normal lieutenant on staff at the Military Intelligence school, who is trying very hard to forget his past. He is sharp and intelligence, but his attitude gets him on the wrong side of most of his seniors. That same attitude coupled with his good looks gets him the bodies of just about any woman he wants. Their hearts; well, that's a different story. As he becomes entangled in Jessie's web of lies and manipulation, he must decide between loyalty to the Army and justice for the wicked. Set in Fort Huachuca, Arizona, the book is fast moving, with plenty of action and unexpected twists. However, it's easy to read and easy to follow, and Peters employs a very blunt, flowing, first-person narrative style. In addition to developing his characters very well, Peters does a fine job of painting a picture of the Army in the post-Vietnam era, when professional soldiers were trying to rebuild the pride and discipline of the service after that conflict. I enjoyed this book tremendously, mostly due to the writing style and the unwilling hero Lieutenant Banks. Darkly humorous, it was a fun, interesting, enjoyable read, and is highly recommended.
Editor-ArmchairGeneral More than 1 year ago
A good mystery novel needs to blend several key elements: interesting, believable characters whose fate readers actually care about; an exciting, compelling story line; enough action (and romance) to propel the plot and engage readers; and a genuine mystery that keeps you guessing right up to the final pages. A great mystery novel must not only contain all of the above, it must be written by a story-teller of unusual narrative skill with an innate talent for capturing detail, atmosphere and nuances of character. Ralph Peters' latest novel, The Officers' Club, is firmly in the latter category - it's a great murder mystery. Peters, winner of the 2002 Dashiell Hammett Award presented by the International Association of Crime Writers for his novel, Honor's Kingdom, mines personal experience and background to capture in his narrative the authentic atmosphere of the time and place in which his story is set. In The Officers' Club, the time is 1981; the place is Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. Peters knows both only too well. The U. S. Army of the late-1970s-early-1980s was deeply troubled, struggling to find its way again in the aftermath of the shattering experience of the Vietnam War. It was not a happy time to be a soldier. Over time and through the efforts of a core of dedicated professionals the Army would be rebuilt; but in 1981 when this novel is set, that long and painful process was just beginning. Military history fans, therefore, will find the book especially revealing in its spot-on recreation of a troubled era in the Army's past that the history books too often gloss over. Standard history texts typically leap over the era from the end of the Vietnam War to the beginning of the 1991 Gulf War, usually quickly chalking up the Army's transformation to the Reagan buildup and leaving it at that. Peters' novel helps fill in one of the blank spots in Army history by giving readers a rare glimpse of just how far that profound transformation had to go. Like Dashiell Hammett and other classic mystery writers such as Raymond Chandler and James M. Cain, Peters shows in The Officers' Club a superb mastery of creating interesting characters, authentic atmosphere and a plot that keeps readers guessing right up to the novel's final pages. Particularly in mood and character interaction, it's evocative of Hammett's The Maltese Falcon, Chandler's The Big Sleep and Cain's Double Indemnity - indeed, Peters' book can stand as a fitting homage to those mystery writer masters of the 1920s-40s. Ralph Peters' The Officers' Club is a great read that is highly recommended.
chasz More than 1 year ago
This is a fun read, especially if you were ever a junior army officer. The characters, vocabulary, and scenery are a terrific reminiscence tool, while being a fun story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ralph Peters was in the class ahead of me at Officer Candidate School. I have read a number of his other books and when I saw this book I knew I had to read it. It was a pleasant trip down memory lane. I thorougly enjoyed all the twists and turns in this novel. If you like murder mysteries this is an engaging, exciting read.
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KenCady More than 1 year ago
The Officer's Club is a cut above your typical novel. The characters are believable and the story has heart. Beyond that, the tale is told with interest and skill. I have read it twice. (And no free copy for me!)
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Molinarolo More than 1 year ago
THE OFFICERS CLUB is a fast read, but the officers are not gentlemen or ladies. The Club consists of young officers who party hard either in Bixby or Mexico. A striking beauty, Lt. Jessie Lamoureax, goes through ALL of the male members, except our narrator 2nd Lt. Roy Banks who is in a relationship with another officer. That relationship can get him out of Fort Huachuca or out of the Army if the right superior knew. And Jessie knows it. Peters opens the story with the murder of Jessie and Banks recalls the events leading up to her murder and the murderer¿s identity. Banks is designing a war game exercise that a hardened colonel wants for the Military Intelligence Class and Officers. It¿s 1981 and the Colonel believes the men have gotten soft to tackle the current problems. Everyone must pass this course to get certified. But Lamoureax isn¿t worried; she is waiting for her assignment, and is playing fast with many of Roy¿s friends. Drug running; Jazz listening, Mexico trips fills the fast paced novel, even his personal mayhem in Iran leaves Banks play-pen Zen unsettling when his lawyer friend gets the goods on the Jessie. I gave the book a star less than the book deserved because I really disliked all of the characters except the ¿dirty¿ lawyer and Jazz aficionado. Peters is surprisingly sympathetic to the early AIDS patient.