Old Scores

Old Scores

by Scott Mackay
5.0 1

Hardcover(First Edition)

$22.80 $24.95 Save 9% Current price is $22.8, Original price is $24.95. You Save 9%.

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Overview

Old Scores by Scott Mackay

Detectives Barry Gilbert and his partner Joe Lombardo are back on the crime scene and this time the investigation's getting personal.

When a music mogul is found strangled to death in his apartment, there's little that would give seasoned professionals Barry Gilbert and Joe Lombardo reason to pause, but this is no ordinary murder victim. Glen Boyd, the sly music producer whom even Gilbert once threatened to kill after the man nearly destroyed his venerable marriage, seems to have a shopping list of enemies a mile long.

From Boyd's former wife, and world famous folk singer, to a rock guitarist, to a notorious drug kingpin, it seems there is no one Boyd's dirty business dealings have not affected. But there is one suspect Gilbert refuses to include even though evidence keeps piling up. Soon it becomes a race against time for Gilbert to find the true culprit behind this heinous crime before his family is torn apart.

With twists and turns even the most jaded crime reader won't see coming, Arthur Ellis Award-winning author Scott Mackay delivers his most provocative and thrilling novel to date-a story of family, loyalty and violence that is impossible to ignore and, once begun, impossible to forget.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780312308414
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Publication date: 08/06/2003
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 320
Product dimensions: 5.66(w) x 8.52(h) x 1.13(d)

About the Author

Scott MacKay has over forty published short stories to his credit, including six Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine stories featuring Detective Barry Gilbert. He has also published six novels, including Cold Comfort, which was nominated for the 1998 Arthur Ellis Award for Best Novel, and Fall Guy, the second novel in the Barry Gilbert series. He lives in Toronto with his wife and two chldren.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Old Scores 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Author posts reviews: 'Glen Boyd was the most successful rock-music promoter and agent in Canada during the 1970s. But in the end he died almost alone. Only his killer was in the room with his or her fingers wrapped around Boyd's neck. Toronto police homicide detective Barry Gilbert is given the task of finding Boyd's killer, despite initial misgivings regarding his objectivity (Gilbert's wife, Regina, had an affair with Boyd 15 years ago). Gilbert has no shortage of potential suspects. Boyd was a charming but devious business partner who promoted many acts to headliner status but would then leave them broke and artistically burned out. He was also an unconscionable womanizer who left half a dozen partners in emotional ruin, including Regina Gilbert. Much to his horror, Gilbert's investigation points ever more strongly to Regina, who admits having recent clandestine contact with Boyd, supposedly to help him conquer his drug habit. Gilbert loses his objectivity as he desperately tries to pin the killing on various other suspects, including Boyd's ex-wife, former folk icon Judy Pelaez. The third entry in the Gilbert series is devilisly plotted and populated with carefully drawn, motivated suspects. The whole is superbly anchored by Gilbert, a decent, hardworking family man who forges ahead despite the possibility that all he holds close may soon collapse around him. A fine, fine effort.' Booklist, starred review ... 'Soon Barry Gilbert will be to Toronto what Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch is to Los Angeles ... This series has a good chance to survive and even thrive. In Old Scores, Mackay has concocted a plot that is bound to hold his readers, and in Gilbert, he has invented a hero certain to elicit sympathy. As a bonus, Mackay has the knack of drawing his readers into moral dilemmas faced by his characters ... Old Scores should prove to be a stepping stone to greater success for Mackay. There is room in Canada, and in crime literature generally, for more writers like Mackay.' Halifax Chronicle Herald