Oliver Twist

Oliver Twist

by Charles Dickens

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Overview

This classic novel has been abridged and adapted into 10 illustrated chapters. This format is ideal for bilingual education - people learning English as a second language (ESL),  English Language Learners (ELL), people of any age intending to improve reading skills and students for whom the original version would be too long or difficult. This learning product is high-interest, low-readability. Readers of this version will improve comprehension, fluency and vocabulary.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780848111779
Publisher: EDCON Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/15/2012
Series: Bring the Classics to Life Series
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 56
File size: 2 MB
Age Range: 7 - 13 Years

About the Author

Charles Dickens was born in the year 1812 in England. Reading, music, and theater were important to his family. When he was 12 years old, his parents sent him to work in a factory. His family was sent to debtor’s prison soon after that. Charles was on his own for several months. After this time in his life he always cared deeply for the homeless and the hungry. In his articles and his books, Dickens often wrote about the laws that pushed people deeper and deeper into poverty. One reason Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol was to encourage people to help the poor. Some of Dickens’ other well-known books are David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities, and Great Expectations.

Date of Birth:

February 7, 1812

Date of Death:

June 18, 1870

Place of Birth:

Portsmouth, England

Place of Death:

Gad's Hill, Kent, England

Education:

Home-schooling; attended Dame School at Chatham briefly and Wellington

Read an Excerpt

Long ago in England there was a workhouse in most every town. Poor people, who had no place to go, lived in a workhouse. But they did not live for free. That’s why it was called a workhouse. They would eat and sleep at the workhouse. But they went to work outside the workhouse. The little money they made went to the workhouse to help pay for their food. And when children were old enough, they went to work, too! One night at the workhouse, Oliver Twist was born. His mother sat up. “Let me see my baby, then I will die,” she said. “Oh, you must not talk about wanting to die,” said the doctor. But Oliver’s mother patter he baby, then fell back and died. "Too bad," said the doctor. "Who was she, anyway?" "No one knows," the doctor's helper answered. "She fell in the street outside. Her baby was ready to be born. We do not know her name, or where she came from." Little Oliver's early years were hard. He and the other children at the workhouse had little to eat. Mrs. Mann, the woman in charge, was mean to the children. She hit them often..,and liked doing it! And she took the children's food money to spend on herself! So little Oliver went hungry most of the time. Sometimes Mr. Bumble came to see the children. It was his job to see that the children were being cared for. It was his job to tell the owners how the children were doing. But like Mrs. Mann, he did not like children. So he didn't do his job real well. "How are the children getting along?" he asked Mrs. Mann, one day.

Table of Contents

Introdução, por Ricardo Lísias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 OLIVER TWIST 25 1 Do lugar em que Oliver Twist nasceu e das circunstâncias que ocorreram nessa ocasião . . . . . . . 27 2 Como Oliver Twist cresceu e foi educado . . . . . . . 31 3 De como Oliver Twist escapou de um emprego que não era sinecura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 4 Oliver acha um emprego e faz a sua entrada no mundo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 5 Oliver trava novos conhecimentos; assiste a um enterro e fica com uma má ideia do ofício . . . . . . 58 6 Luta e vitória . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 7 Oliver prossegue em sua rebelião . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 8 Oliver vai a Londres e encontra em caminho um rapaz misterioso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 9 Novos pormenores acerca do amável ancião e seus discípulos, rapazes das mais altas esperanças 92 10 Oliver estreita as suas relações com os novos amigos e adquire experiência à sua custa. A pequenez deste capítulo não impede que seja um dos mais importantes da história do nosso herói. . . . . . . . . .100 11 Trata-se de um Sr. Fang, comissário de polícia, e dá-se uma amostra de sua maneira de julgar. . . .106 12 Oliver é tratado como nunca; novas informações a respeito do amável ancião e seus discípulos . . .115 13 Apresentação de alguns personagens novos que não são estranhos a certos particulares interessantes desta história . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 14 Profecia de um certo Sr. Grimwig a respeito de Oliver na ocasião em que ele foi dar um recado .134 15 Vê-se o amor que o jocoso judeu e Miss Nancy tinham a Oliver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145 16 O que foi feito de Oliver depois de ser levado por Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153 17 A má estrela de Oliver traz a Londres um grande personagem expressamente para lhe marear a reputação . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164 18 Como Oliver passava o tempo na sociedade de seus respeitáveis amigos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 19 Adoção de um plano de campanha . . . . . . . . . . . . .182 20 Oliver é entregue ao Sr. Guilherme Sikes . . . . . . . 192 21 A expedição. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202 22 Arrombar para roubar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209 23 De como um bedel pode ter bom sentimentos. Curiosa conversa do Sr. Bumble e uma senhora. 218 24 Pormenores dolorosos, mas curtos, cujo conhecimento é necessário para a inteligência desta história . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .227 25 Encontramos outra vez Fagin e a sua troça. . . . . .234 26 Entra em cena um personagem misterioso. Importantes pormenores estreitamente ligados com esta história. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242 27 Para reparar uma descortesia de outro capítulo em que se abandonou sem mais cerimônia uma senhora. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255 28 Prosseguem as aventuras de Oliver . . . . . . . . . . . . .264 29 Em que se apresentam os habitantes da casa que recolhera Oliver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .276

Reading Group Guide

This reading group guide for An Atlas of Impossible Longing includes an introduction, discussion questions, and ideas for enhancing your book club. The suggested questions are intended to help your reading group find new and interesting angles and topics for your discussion. We hope that these ideas will enrich your conversation and increase your enjoyment of the book.

INTRODUCTION

In this reimagining of Charles Dickens’s classic, Great Expectations, Pip is an orphaned young werewolf living with his ill-tempered sister and her gentle husband, the blacksmith Joe Gargery. One fateful night, visiting his parents’ grave under the full moon, Pip encounters a frightening stranger—another werewolf and a convict no less. Too afraid to do anything other than obey the stranger’s instruction, Pip helps this convict and sets in motion of chain of events that will forever change the course of his life. Pip is sent to reside with Miss Havisham, a vampire who was sired and left on her wedding day by the one she loved. She has adopted Estella and raised her as a vampire slayer, to seek revenge on the supernatural creatures that she blames for her ruin. Pip, in awe of Estella’s beauty, falls instantly in love with her despite the fact that she has been trained to hate all “Scapegraces.” When an anonymous benefactor sends Pip to London to become a gentleman, he believes it is his chance to win Estella’s hand. The question that lies ahead is whether Pip will be able to overcome his wolfish ways and turn his once grave expectations for himself into great ones.

TOPICS AND QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION

1. In Pip’s world, the term “Scapegraces” is used to define “those of a supernatural sort” (p. 11). What do you think this term implies about the way that creatures like werewolves and vampires were viewed in this society?

2. On page 12, Pip wonders, “Was it a crime to merely be different?” While being a werewolf is simply a condition inherited at birth, vampires prey on the living to increase their population, and yet are “considered civilized and welcome to mix in society.” Is one creature more monstrous than the other? Do both werewolves and vampires have the capacity for good and evil?

3. After being invited to Miss Havisham’s and then later learning of his anonymous benefactor, Pip often feels ashamed of his roots, and of Joe’s commonness even more so than his own Scapegrace status. Yet Joe never seems to exhibit any embarrassment over Pip’s wolfishness. What does this say about each of their characters? What influences the focus of Pip’s shame?

4. When Mrs. Joe dies (the first time), Pip finds what he knows to be evidence of Magwitch’s crime, but he still does not accuse him. Why do you think Pip believes that Magwitch is innocent of this crime when the main piece of evidence points directly to him?

5. Throughout most of the story, Estella is cold-hearted and shows no affection for Pip despite his unwavering love for her. Why should he love someone who could possibly end up killing him in her crusade against Scapegraces? What makes him fall in love with her in the first place? Why do you think Pip continues to pursue someone who will never return his feelings?

6. Pip and Herbert have a very special friendship. Do you think this brotherly love grew out of the wolfish need to be part of a pack? Or something more human?

7. While Miss Havisham is herself a vampire, she has trained Estella in the ways of vampire slaying. Pip wonders “if Miss Havisham weren’t really wishing to be staked by Estella one day in raising her to such an art” (p. 235). Do you agree? Do you think Miss Havisham’s eventual outcome either supports or refutes this opinion? Why does Estella never stake her, if indeed her mission is to kill vampires?

8. Pip is horrified when he finds out the Magwitch has been his anonymous benefactor all along. Why do you think this revelation is so abhorrent to Pip, when he seems so willing to not only protect Magwitch and keep him safe, but to also protect his feelings by not revealing his disappointment?

9. On page 284, Pip explains to Miss Havisham that there are certain Scapegraces who “showed more humanity than the humans.” Discuss which of the Scapegraces behave with the utmost humanity, and which of the human characters exhibit what could be categorized as monstrous behavior?

10. How does the discovery of Estella’s parentage change things for Pip? Does it change your opinion of her?

11. Why is it so easy for Joe and Biddy to forgive Pip after he had neglected them for so many years? Should Joe have been angry that Pip spent so much time visiting Magwitch after he was captured, when he never kept up his visits to Joe like he had promised?

12. Though Estella is able to eventually see the goodness in werewolves, she never changes her opinion of vampires. Why do you think she can pardon and accept most Scapegraces and still seek vengeance against vampires?

ENHANCE YOUR BOOK CLUB

1. Grave Expectations is a reimagining of Charles Dickens’s classic Great Expectations. Have you read Great Expectations before? If so, how did the supernatural version compare to the classic? What remained the same in this new version of the story? What changed? If not, choose Great Expectations for your next book club pick.

2. Grave Expectations is a literary mash-up—where a fictional classic is retold in present day or with mythical substitutions. Examples include Pride and Prejudice and Zombies or the movie Clueless, which was essentially Jane Austen’s Emma set in Beverly Hills during the 1990s. Try creating a literary mash-up of your own with your book club. Pick a favorite classic and retell the story as though it took place in the present day or with some supernatural characters. The more imaginative, the better!

3. Legends of werewolves and vampires have been carried down through the centuries. How does their depiction in this work compare with your preconceived notions of such supernatural creatures?

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Oliver Twist Bring the Classics to Life Series, Level 3) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
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