On Two Fronts: Being the Adventures of an Indian Mule Corps in France and Gallipoli

On Two Fronts: Being the Adventures of an Indian Mule Corps in France and Gallipoli

by Heber Maitland Alexander

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III A GREAT RECEPTION IN FRANCE On September 26 the ships carrying the first of the Indian troops dropped anchor in Marseilles harbour. A couple of days previously the escorting man-o'-war had signalled that the convoy formation might be broken up, and each ship was to make her own way into port. Then ensued a sort of general post, the faster vessels gradually forcing their way to the front. The Castalia, which had hitherto been compelled to travel well within her powers, now showed what she could do and eventually arrived among the first two or three of the whole fleet. The Marseilles people had had no time to become blase before the Indian ranks of the 32nd Signal Company and the 9th Mule Corps made their appearance. Some sort of a greeting from our allies we had expected; but what actually happened almost defies description. The first inkling of what our reception was to be came from the ships we passed en route to the wharf. On every deck were gathered passengers and crew, waving handkerchiefs and hats in greeting. Then, as the transports passed alongside themany wharves and quays, we could see large crowds collected at every advantageous point to cheer the Indian contingent and welcome it to France. I could not help contrasting this reception with our send-off from Amballa and Bombay, where nobody appeared to take the slightest interest in our departure. But then the French nation is full of sentiment, and the British just the reverse. On arrival, officers commanding units were directed to proceed to the steamer which was at that time used as Headquarters Indian Base. I had to report to the Base Transport Officer, in whom I found an old friend, Major Lushington, who was for several years captain of the Supply and Transport Corps cricket team, and had in th...

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780469645011
Publisher: Creative Media Partners, LLC
Publication date: 02/25/2019
Pages: 258
Product dimensions: 6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.54(d)

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CHAPTER III A GREAT RECEPTION IN FRANCE On September 26 the ships carrying the first of the Indian troops dropped anchor in Marseilles harbour. A couple of days previously the escorting man-o'-war had signalled that the convoy formation might be broken up, and each ship was to make her own way into port. Then ensued a sort of general post, the faster vessels gradually forcing their way to the front. The Castalia, which had hitherto been compelled to travel well within her powers, now showed what she could do and eventually arrived among the first two or three of the whole fleet. The Marseilles people had had no time to become blase before the Indian ranks of the 32nd Signal Company and the 9th Mule Corps made their appearance. Some sort of a greeting from our allies we had expected; but what actually happened almost defies description. The first inkling of what our reception was to be came from the ships we passed en route to the wharf. On every deck were gathered passengers and crew, waving handkerchiefs and hats in greeting. Then, as the transports passed alongside themany wharves and quays, we could see large crowds collected at every advantageous point to cheer the Indian contingent and welcome it to France. I could not help contrasting this reception with our send-off from Amballa and Bombay, where nobody appeared to take the slightest interest in our departure. But then the French nation is full of sentiment, and the British just the reverse. On arrival, officers commanding units were directed to proceed to the steamer which was at that time used as Headquarters Indian Base. I had to report to the Base Transport Officer, in whom I found an old friend, Major Lushington, whowas for several years captain of the Supply and Transport Corps cricket team, and had in th...

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