One Week in December

One Week in December

by Holly Chamberlin
3.4 13

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One Week in December 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
JGarrison More than 1 year ago
This is the second book of Holly Chamberlin that I've read, the first being "Tuscan Holiday." I didn't realize the author was the same until I was about halfway through this novel and looked at the others that she had written. I have to say, I probably wouldn't have picked it up (fortunately got it at a used book store). Chamberlin is an excellent writer. Don't get me wrong. I enjoy her style of writing and the overall story. But I HATE her characters. She always has a tendency to make her characters the most over dramatic and many ways un-realistic. Characters should be somewhat relate able--many of these characters weren't. Some points (Don't read further because of spoilers): Lily and Grandma Nora--good Lord, was the ONLY thing that Chamberlin could come up with is the idealistic teenager (I know Lily was a college student--but she wrote her like she was 16 and an idiot) who would do nothing but dwell on her grandfather's affair?? I realize that this was a cornerstone to Lily's crisis, but geez! It got old and I found myself skipping pages whenever Lily came up in the story. Olivia: I've never seen a woman go through a mid-life nervous breakdown about going on about the past. Couldn't she find another way to weave Olivia and James' issues in a better way without making the character seem like a freak? Geez! Rain: this story is essentially about the kid--barely had a "role" in the story. David: If Chamberlin wanted to write about a jerk, she did a great job. It could've been better. A lot better. Again, not to say that the overall story isn't good--just remember that Chamberlin likes to make her characters ridiculous...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The characters are believable. The story line was excellent! An easy read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
A Christmas full of family disfunction leads to many questions of morals, faith, and trust in one another. Its a lovely story, well written. There are so many characters you can relate to.I reccomend this especially if you may be dreadful of seeing the family this Christmas. It is an excellent reminder that it is important to over look flaws and learn to appreciate the family you love.
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harstan More than 1 year ago
Becca Rowan feels all alone, but her loneliness is compounded whenever she sees her sixteen year old niece, Rain. She knows she made a deal with her older brother David and his wife Naomi to raise Rain, but now she wants to tell her biological daughter the truth. Still Becca also knows if she does she will destroy her family as she acquiesced as a teen giving birth that her sibling and his spouse would raise her daughter as their own and telling her the truth when Rain turned twenty-one. During the annual family Christmas gathering, she plans to tell Rain the truth and to bring her daughter home. When she does, all hell breaks out. She feels remorseful wondering how selfish she was to break her promise while her brother and his wife are irate and feeling betrayed and Rain is upset and confused. Only the next door neighbor Alex provides her some comfort and advice as Becca tries to repair the disaster she caused. This is an engaging family drama although the key catalyst in causing the trauma Becca comes across extremely selfish and shallow rather than emotionally disturbed. The rest of the Rowan brood are developed to the point of being understood by readers in the way they react to Becca. Interesting and well written, fans will enjoy this contemporary tale but feel disappointed that Becca's mental anguish was not developed into crippling phobic loneliness way beyond her self-centered need. Harriet Klausner