ISBN-10:
0691019681
ISBN-13:
9780691019680
Pub. Date:
02/21/1971
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Open Society and Its Enemies, Volume 1: The Spell of Plato / Edition 5

Open Society and Its Enemies, Volume 1: The Spell of Plato / Edition 5

by Karl R. Popper

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780691019680
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Publication date: 02/21/1971
Series: Open Society and Its Enemies Series
Edition description: 5TH, REVISED
Pages: 376
Sales rank: 686,381
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x (d)

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Open Society and Its Enemies, Volume 1: The Spell of Plato 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Ramirez on LibraryThing 5 months ago
Everyone blame him, philosophers call him 'Little' Popper, just because sometimes he says things that make sense without messing around with buzzowords.Sure, this book isn't flawless.He vehemently attacks Plato for the use that has been made through time of his cultural inheritance, in a kind of out of proportion Nuremberg trial; he despises Plato for not being liberal, when liberalism didn't even exist back then. He depicts ancient Athens' history like a spy story tale and there's a persistent and nasty hint that the open society, the truly good and selfrighteous one, is just our liberal-market-free-non communist one (and goodbye to free thinking. What free thought is supposed to do when you are already in the nearly perfect society?).Still, keeping in mind these faults, Popper's insights on reason, ethics, relativism and science are good.Throw away the economist, politic, historian Popper, but hold on to the philosopher one.
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Popper's ideal of a democratic 'open society' run by unelected bureaucrats in faceless institutions gets substituted for Marx's failed utopian class-less society as the ideal for ex-communists and avowed social democrats in this 'Modern' mis-reading of Plato. Popper makes the mistake of believing that 'open societies' are 'better' than 'closed societies', since they can more readily accomodate change, new technology, and experimentation in social engineering. But without first defining his ideal of 'the good' or the units of measure for social experimentation, Popper fails to make his case. Instead, he attempts to deconstruct one of the few philosphers to offer a balanced perspective and understanding of all the alternatives. An 'open society' that is closed to contemplation of 'closed societies' isn't very 'open'.