The Orchard

The Orchard

by Theresa Weir

Hardcover

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Overview

THE ORCHARD is the story of a street-smart city girl who must adapt to a new life on an apple farm after she falls in love with Adrian Curtis, the golden boy of a prominent local family whose lives and orchards seem to be cursed. Married after only three months, young Theresa finds life with Adrian on the farm far more difficult and dangerous than she expected. Rejected by her husband's family as an outsider, she slowly learns for herself about the isolated world of farming, pesticides, environmental destruction, and death, even as she falls more deeply in love with her husband, a man she at first hardly knew and the land that has been in his family for generations. She becomes a reluctant player in their attempt to keep the codling moth from destroying the orchard, but she and Adrian eventually come to know that their efforts will not only fail but will ultimately take an irreparable toll.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780446584692
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
Publication date: 09/21/2011
Pages: 240
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Theresa Weir is a USA Today bestselling author of nineteen novels that have spanned the genres of suspense, mystery, thriller, romantic suspense, and paranormal; her work has been translated into twenty languages. Her debut title was the cult phenomenon, Amazon Lily, initially published by Pocket Books and later reissued by Bantam. Writing as Theresa Weir, she won a RITA for romantic suspense (Cool Shade) and the Daphne du Maurier Award (for Bad Karma). She has also published as Anne Frasier. Her thriller and suspense titles have hit the USA Today list (Hush, Sleep Tight, Play Dead) and have been featured in Mystery Guild, Literary Guild, and Book of the Month Club. Hush was both a RITA and Daphne du Maurier finalist. Theresa spent twenty years living on a working apple farm, and now divides her time between St. Paul, Minnesota, and a century-old Gothic church in rural Wisconsin.

What People are Saying About This

Nicholas Sparks

The Orchard is a lovely book in all the ways that really matter, one of those rare and wonderful memoirs in which people you've never met become your friends. I read it in a single sitting, lost in the story, and by the time I put it down, I was amazed by Weir's ability to evoke such genuine emotion. Read it: you'll be glad you did.

Customer Reviews

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Orchard 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
nyauthoress More than 1 year ago
It is hard to believe that a USA Today bestselling author of nineteen novels had difficulty finding a publisher for her memoir. Theresa Weir, who has published award-winning suspense, romance, thriller and paranormal books under her name and the pseudonym Anne Frasier, persisted. Three years later, The Orchard was published. Her gift to us is a riveting, honest memoir. At age twenty-one, Theresa fell in love with Adrian Curtis, an apple farmer, whose family waged a battle to keep their orchard trees free from moths. She never anticipated being shunned by his family or the bleakness of farm life. The environmental implications of pesticide use in the story are chilling. Although the issues raised are disturbing, the writing is fluid. Weir expertly weaves a sense of foreboding through the rows of apple trees the Curtis family vow to protect. The book jacket leads us to believe the story is that of saving a fifth-generation apple farm. The author's note, however, is very telling. The book is a catharsis. Sometimes the only way to purge oneself of a poison is to write about it. Grand Central Publishing graciously supplied the advanced readers copy for my unbiased opinion. Reviewed by Holly Weiss, author of Crestmont
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was so beautifully written it felt like poetry. Beautiful story and didn't want to put it down. Good depiction of young woman's journey through life and love, the orchard being a great teacher.
hollysing on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It is hard to believe that a USA Today bestselling author of nineteen novels had difficulty finding a publisher for her memoir. Theresa Weir, who has published award-winning suspense, romance, thriller and paranormal books under her name and the pseudonym Anne Frasier, persisted. Three years later, The Orchard was published. Her gift to us is a riveting, honest memoir.At age twenty-one, Theresa fell in love with Adrian Curtis, an apple farmer, whose family waged a battle to keep their orchard trees free from moths. She never anticipated being shunned by his family or the bleakness of farm life. The environmental implications of pesticide use in the story are chilling. Although the issues raised are disturbing, the writing is fluid. Weir expertly weaves a sense of foreboding through the rows of apple trees the Curtis family vow to protect.The book jacket leads us to believe the story is that of saving a fifth-generation apple farm. The author¿s note, however, is very telling. The book is a catharsis. Sometimes the only way to purge oneself of a poison is to write about it.Grand Central Publishing graciously supplied the advanced readers copy for my unbiased opinion.Reviewed by Holly Weiss, author of Crestmont
JackieBlem on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Theresa Weir is a best selling author, both under her own name and under the nom de plume Anne Frasier. however, this book is very, very different from all of her others. This time, she's telling us about her early life, her marriage and the apple farm she raised her family on. This book is unvarnished and honest, and from what some interviews I've read, I'd say that it was almost as difficult to write as it was to live. There were certainly happy moments, but there were plenty of horrifying ones as well. Can you imagine living somewhere where every day you had the garlicky taste of herbicide in your mouth from the breeze coming through the window, or brushing off the dust of pesticide from your clothes after walking through the orchard with your children? Weir tells the tale of her family, but also of the large family run apple based business that her husband's family had been sustained by for generations. She makes the point again and again that farming isn't what your grandparents or great grandparents did anymore--now it's big business, big competition and plenty of politics. She admits that at the writing of this book, she had not stepped foot on the farm in 15 years, so she can't say what has changed, but knowing what she knows, it is extremely unlikely that anything has swung toward the better. This is an engrossing book on many levels, and a brave one. It sheds a bright and unwavering light on the secrets of culture, family, relationships and farming that will be impossible to forget.
Beamis12 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When I first started this book I wasn't really in the mood for a memoir and almost put it aside twice, but the writing was excellent and I found the people, Theresa and her uncle very interesting. By the time I was done I had goosebumps. This memoir is about how 2 people, both exceedingly young, who have little in common, trying to make a go of a marriage and an orchard. When they have children together, they form a family and grow together to find, love, peace and a sort of contentment. Yet there is so much more in this relatively short book, ties to family and land, farmers and pesticides, expectations and hopes and finally an ending and a new beginning.
nbmars on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Although I don¿t usually read memoirs, this lovely story by Theresa Weir of her married life is novelistic in style, and really is an unforgettable story.Theresa was 21 when she met 23-year-old Adrian Curtis, and they married a mere three months later. Adrian was an apple farmer and Theresa went to live with him in one of the small buildings on his family¿s farm. Adrian¿s parents, particularly his mother Ruth, were opposed to the marriage, and constantly tried to sabotage it by trying to maintain control over Adrian and by disparaging Theresa. But life on the apple farm had many rewards too. Theresa loved the beauty of the natural setting, and became emotionally invested in the art of raising tasty apples. But she never realized until it was too late that the ubiquitous pesticides used to ensure the health of the apples were not so beneficial to the health of the people who inhaled them.Theresa ends the book with a poignant plea to readers to understand that you can never know when you can lose someone, and so, she exhorts us: "Don¿t wait. Don¿t ever wait."Discussion: This book would make a wonderful book club choice. How do you deal with hostile in-laws and a spouse who feels caught in the middle? How much should you sacrifice for the sake of family harmony? How do you even know whether you love someone or not, just because you share a life and children? When the choice is a healthy crop to support your family, or a healthy family with no means of support, which do you choose, and how do you justify it?Evaluation: This story of hardship and suffering, and love and hope pretty much stole my heart. At the end of the book, I felt like I knew this family well, and my tears were not only for all that Teresa had lost, but also for all that she finally achieved.
WhatsBeyondForks More than 1 year ago
The Orchard: A Memoir by Theresa Weir is not a book I'd typically read, because I don't enjoy non-fiction as a general rule. But, I'm glad I made an exception for this one. First of all, it doesn't read like a non-fiction biography. The author tells her story in a fictional way. I didn't feel like this was someone's dusty biography. I enjoyed her style quite a bit. I try to buy organic most of the time, and after reading this book... holy cow. I just want to be self sufficient and never buy from a store again. It was very eye opening. There is this whole farming subculture that I never knew about. They try to protect their livelihood and their image, and do so at the risk of their health and even their children's health. Generations and generations of people living this way by hiding the realities of what the chemicals they are using are really doing to them and their surroundings. It was scary. That stuff was what I took away from the book the most, but that wasn't all that it was about, obviously. Theresa didn't grow up on a farm, but she married into one. She had a rough upbringing that most wouldn't live through, but she did and even though her married life is less than ideal, it's much better than anything she has known previously. Adrian is a good man. I really felt for him through most of this book. After finishing, I read an interview with the author. She talked about how Adrian was funny and made her laugh and how they had fun times together during their marriage. I really wish some of those moments could have been included in the book. It would have added some much needed lightness, to an otherwise heavy storyline. Plus, I feel like Adrian deserved some of that lightness in his parts of the story. I grew attached to this family. Not the in-laws so much, but to Theresa, Adrian, and the kids... I felt like I really got to know them. It was a unique reading experience. I don't know how much of this applies to farming as a whole. This was one person's account of her experiences, and I found it to be interesting, informative, and entertaining. I'm glad I stepped outside my reading box and read something a little different from my norm. I'd definitely recommend it to others.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I realy enjoyed reading this it brinngss back my memories of farm life and the spraying of the fields with a plane my brother named the plane the green hornet this is a well writyen book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well-written and poignant .  Enjoyed the honesty in the author's telling of  her  story. A little preach-y at times regarding the use of pesticides but I don't know that that's a bad thing. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. Loved the intimacy of it, the honesty and the author's bravery in telling the truth.
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Justdb More than 1 year ago
This is a quick read and it does not ramble on and on. Once I started reading it I had a hard time putting it down, so I just kept reading until it was done. I really do look at an apple differently now.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It gave me a lot to think about. This country has got a serious love affair with chemicals to cure everything.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It wasn't what expected but so glad I stuck with it!
Palegirl More than 1 year ago
One of the most warm and painfully honest memoirs I've ever read. Wonderfully descriptive scenes; absolutely piercing. And read the last 20 or 30 pages with a large box of tissue.
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Excellent book. Very fast read.