The Orchard

The Orchard

by Theresa Weir
4.0 26

Hardcover(Library Binding - Large Print)

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Orchard 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
nyauthoress More than 1 year ago
It is hard to believe that a USA Today bestselling author of nineteen novels had difficulty finding a publisher for her memoir. Theresa Weir, who has published award-winning suspense, romance, thriller and paranormal books under her name and the pseudonym Anne Frasier, persisted. Three years later, The Orchard was published. Her gift to us is a riveting, honest memoir. At age twenty-one, Theresa fell in love with Adrian Curtis, an apple farmer, whose family waged a battle to keep their orchard trees free from moths. She never anticipated being shunned by his family or the bleakness of farm life. The environmental implications of pesticide use in the story are chilling. Although the issues raised are disturbing, the writing is fluid. Weir expertly weaves a sense of foreboding through the rows of apple trees the Curtis family vow to protect. The book jacket leads us to believe the story is that of saving a fifth-generation apple farm. The author's note, however, is very telling. The book is a catharsis. Sometimes the only way to purge oneself of a poison is to write about it. Grand Central Publishing graciously supplied the advanced readers copy for my unbiased opinion. Reviewed by Holly Weiss, author of Crestmont
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was so beautifully written it felt like poetry. Beautiful story and didn't want to put it down. Good depiction of young woman's journey through life and love, the orchard being a great teacher.
WhatsBeyondForks 4 months ago
The Orchard: A Memoir by Theresa Weir is not a book I'd typically read, because I don't enjoy non-fiction as a general rule. But, I'm glad I made an exception for this one. First of all, it doesn't read like a non-fiction biography. The author tells her story in a fictional way. I didn't feel like this was someone's dusty biography. I enjoyed her style quite a bit. I try to buy organic most of the time, and after reading this book... holy cow. I just want to be self sufficient and never buy from a store again. It was very eye opening. There is this whole farming subculture that I never knew about. They try to protect their livelihood and their image, and do so at the risk of their health and even their children's health. Generations and generations of people living this way by hiding the realities of what the chemicals they are using are really doing to them and their surroundings. It was scary. That stuff was what I took away from the book the most, but that wasn't all that it was about, obviously. Theresa didn't grow up on a farm, but she married into one. She had a rough upbringing that most wouldn't live through, but she did and even though her married life is less than ideal, it's much better than anything she has known previously. Adrian is a good man. I really felt for him through most of this book. After finishing, I read an interview with the author. She talked about how Adrian was funny and made her laugh and how they had fun times together during their marriage. I really wish some of those moments could have been included in the book. It would have added some much needed lightness, to an otherwise heavy storyline. Plus, I feel like Adrian deserved some of that lightness in his parts of the story. I grew attached to this family. Not the in-laws so much, but to Theresa, Adrian, and the kids... I felt like I really got to know them. It was a unique reading experience. I don't know how much of this applies to farming as a whole. This was one person's account of her experiences, and I found it to be interesting, informative, and entertaining. I'm glad I stepped outside my reading box and read something a little different from my norm. I'd definitely recommend it to others.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I realy enjoyed reading this it brinngss back my memories of farm life and the spraying of the fields with a plane my brother named the plane the green hornet this is a well writyen book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well-written and poignant .  Enjoyed the honesty in the author's telling of  her  story. A little preach-y at times regarding the use of pesticides but I don't know that that's a bad thing. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. Loved the intimacy of it, the honesty and the author's bravery in telling the truth.
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Justdb More than 1 year ago
This is a quick read and it does not ramble on and on. Once I started reading it I had a hard time putting it down, so I just kept reading until it was done. I really do look at an apple differently now.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It gave me a lot to think about. This country has got a serious love affair with chemicals to cure everything.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It wasn't what expected but so glad I stuck with it!
Palegirl More than 1 year ago
One of the most warm and painfully honest memoirs I've ever read. Wonderfully descriptive scenes; absolutely piercing. And read the last 20 or 30 pages with a large box of tissue.
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Excellent book. Very fast read.
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