ISBN-10:
0262134268
ISBN-13:
9780262134262
Pub. Date:
09/01/2003
Publisher:
MIT Press
The Organizational Complex: Architecture, Media, and Corporate Space

The Organizational Complex: Architecture, Media, and Corporate Space

by Reinhold Martin
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Overview

A historical and theoretical analysis of corporate architecture in the United States after the Second World War.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780262134262
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 09/01/2003
Pages: 324
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.85(d)

About the Author

Reinhold Martin is an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, Columbia University, and a partner in the firm of Martin/Baxi Architects.

What People are Saying About This

Anthony Vidler

With brilliant insight and exciting new research based on important primary sources, Martin develops a fascinating narrative of the interlocking development of organizational and architectural thought and practice during the 'boom period' of office building between 1945 and 1960. Profiting from a new approach to architectural historical studies that understands the importance of apparently 'extra-architectural' information for the interpretation and explanation of architecture proper, Martin uncovers the interface between the organization of knowledge and business and the organization of the architectural firm and design practice.

Kenneth Frampton

By rereading with a critical eye the fifty-year-old techno-aesthetic discourse of the military-industrial complex as found in the thought and architecture of Gyorgy Kepes, Eliot Noyes, and above all Eero Saarinen, Martin compels us to reassess the curtain-wall corporate architecture of the fifties as if its modular laconic character was in and of itself an analog for telematic organization and control. This scholarly analysis of hitherto unexamined material draws special attention to the significance of this period for the future of architecture.

Endorsement

By rereading with a critical eye the fifty-year-old techno-aesthetic discourse of the military-industrial complex as found in the thought and architecture of Gyorgy Kepes, Eliot Noyes, and above all Eero Saarinen, Martin compels us to reassess the curtain-wall corporate architecture of the fifties as if its modular laconic character was in and of itself an analog for telematic organization and control. This scholarly analysis of hitherto unexamined material draws special attention to the significance of this period for the future of architecture.

Kenneth Frampton, Ware Professor of Architecture, Columbia University

From the Publisher

This book perceptively and eloquently uncovers some of the hidden logic of postwar American culture. The seemingly cool, blank facades of generic office buildings turn out to have been driven by a hot mix of cybernetic, military, economic, artistic, and even philosophical thinking. Who would have thought that corporate architecture could be so interesting?

Beatriz Colomina , Professor of Architecture, Princeton University

With brilliant insight and exciting new research based on important primary sources, Martin develops a fascinating narrative of the interlocking development of organizational and architectural thought and practice during the 'boom period' of office building between 1945 and 1960. Profiting from a new approach to architectural historical studies that understands the importance of apparently 'extra-architectural' information for the interpretation and explanation of architecture proper, Martin uncovers the interface between the organization of knowledge and business and the organization of the architectural firm and design practice.

Anthony Vidler , Dean, School of Architecture, The Cooper Union

By rereading with a critical eye the fifty-year-old techno-aesthetic discourse of the military-industrial complex as found in the thought and architecture of Gyorgy Kepes, Eliot Noyes, and above all Eero Saarinen, Martin compels us to reassess the curtain-wall corporate architecture of the fifties as if its modular laconic character was in and of itself an analog for telematic organization and control. This scholarly analysis of hitherto unexamined material draws special attention to the significance of this period for the future of architecture.

Kenneth Frampton , Ware Professor of Architecture, Columbia University

Beatriz Colomina

This book perceptively and eloquently uncovers some of the hidden logic of postwar American culture. The seemingly cool, blank facades of generic office buildings turn out to have been driven by a hot mix of cybernetic, military, economic, artistic, and even philosophical thinking. Who would have thought that corporate architecture could be so interesting?

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