ISBN-10:
0761904158
ISBN-13:
9780761904151
Pub. Date:
01/23/2003
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Organizing for Community Controlled Development: Renewing Civil Society / Edition 1

Organizing for Community Controlled Development: Renewing Civil Society / Edition 1

by Patricia Watkins Murphy, James V. CunninghamPatricia Watkins Murphy
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Overview

"This book is both important and timely. Written by practitioners who are also academics, the book combines solid research, observation and practical experience that speak forcefully to the need for both local place-based development and greater citizen involvement. The examples they give of successful local efforts to renew neighborhoods demonstrate that change is possible and that resources are available for such purposes. Patricia W. Murphy and James V. Cunningham have provided a roadmap for rebuilding many of our communities and for strengthening the foundations of our democracy. "

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780761904151
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Publication date: 01/23/2003
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 360
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 10.00(h) x (d)

About the Author

Pat Murphy is President of Cornerstones for Development a for-profit firm that works on the local, regional, and national levels with the community, human service, public and philanthropic sectors providing consultation, training and technical assistance to build resilient and inclusive organizations and communities. She has more than 20 years experience working for and with community-based and community-serving organizations and human service providers as staff, volunteer, board member, consultant and educator in community organizing and development. Prior to establishing Cornerstones for Development in 1992, Pat worked along side residents of Pittsburgh neighborhoods as Executive Director of the Stanton Heights Civic Association and Associate Director of the Hill Community Development Corporation, and Economic Development Planner at the Community Technical Assistance Center.

As an Adjunct Professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work, Pat teaches graduate courses in governance, grant proposal writing, community organizing and development, and working with diverse populations.

As an organizer committed to community led social change, Pat has served as a Board member and active volunteer with many Pittsburgh-based non-profits, and nationally with the Development Leadership Network. She is currently on the Board and Grantmaking Committee Co-Chair of the Three Rivers Community Foundation, which funds community-led economic and social justice initiatives, and serves on the Steering Committee of the Regional Coalition of Community Builders, of which she is a founding organizer.

For the past six years Pat has been a potter and grown to embrace woodfiring.

Pat Murphy is President of Cornerstones for Development a for-profit firm that works on the local, regional, and national levels with the community, human service, public and philanthropic sectors providing consultation, training and technical assistance to build resilient and inclusive organizations and communities. She has more than 20 years experience working for and with community-based and community-serving organizations and human service providers as staff, volunteer, board member, consultant and educator in community organizing and development. Prior to establishing Cornerstones for Development in 1992, Pat worked along side residents of Pittsburgh neighborhoods as Executive Director of the Stanton Heights Civic Association and Associate Director of the Hill Community Development Corporation, and Economic Development Planner at the Community Technical Assistance Center.

As an Adjunct Professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work, Pat teaches graduate courses in governance, grant proposal writing, community organizing and development, and working with diverse populations.

As an organizer committed to community led social change, Pat has served as a Board member and active volunteer with many Pittsburgh-based non-profits, and nationally with the Development Leadership Network. She is currently on the Board and Grantmaking Committee Co-Chair of the Three Rivers Community Foundation, which funds community-led economic and social justice initiatives, and serves on the Steering Committee of the Regional Coalition of Community Builders, of which she is a founding organizer.

For the past six years Pat has been a potter and grown to embrace woodfiring.

Jim Cunningham was born in Chicago where he did political and neighborhood development organizing in the 1950s, before moving to Pittsburgh whose neighborhood people were in 1959 beginning to participate in the city's renewal effort. As an organizer for ACTION-Housing he assisted neighborhood people to build organizations that gave them a voice in decisions which affected their lives. Pittsburgh issues then as now were race, jobs and who makes the public decisions that impact on families and small communities. After working for seven years with residents and their allies he began to teach community organizing at the School of Social Work of the University of Pittsburgh.

He helped to create a masters program built on 50% time in field experience and 50% in academic studies, which drew a steady stream of students from the U.S. and abroad. Along the route he published four books including The Resurgent Neighborhood (Fides,1965), Urban Leadership During the Sixties (Brandeis,1970), A New Public Policy for Neighborhood Preservation (Praeger,1979, co-authored with Roger Ahlbrandt), and Building Neighborhood Organizations (Notre Dame,1983, co-authored with Milton Kotler).

Jim retired from full-time teaching in 1997 and continues to teach part-time, and to write, while serving as a volunteer with the Race and Reconciliation Dialogue Group of St.Paul Cathedral Parish, and with the Living Wage Campaign for the Pittsburgh region.

Jim Cunningham was born in Chicago where he did political and neighborhood development organizing in the 1950s, before moving to Pittsburgh whose neighborhood people were in 1959 beginning to participate in the city's renewal effort. As an organizer for ACTION-Housing he assisted neighborhood people to build organizations that gave them a voice in decisions which affected their lives. Pittsburgh issues then as now were race, jobs and who makes the public decisions that impact on families and small communities. After working for seven years with residents and their allies he began to teach community organizing at the School of Social Work of the University of Pittsburgh.

He helped to create a masters program built on 50% time in field experience and 50% in academic studies, which drew a steady stream of students from the U.S. and abroad. Along the route he published four books including The Resurgent Neighborhood (Fides,1965), Urban Leadership During the Sixties (Brandeis,1970), A New Public Policy for Neighborhood Preservation (Praeger,1979, co-authored with Roger Ahlbrandt), and Building Neighborhood Organizations (Notre Dame,1983, co-authored with Milton Kotler).

Jim retired from full-time teaching in 1997 and continues to teach part-time, and to write, while serving as a volunteer with the Race and Reconciliation Dialogue Group of St.Paul Cathedral Parish, and with the Living Wage Campaign for the Pittsburgh region.

Table of Contents

A Personal Preface
Acknowledgments
Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 2 The Potency of Community Power
Chapter 3 Community Development Corporations and the Resurgence of Organizing
Chapter 4 The Small Community
Chapter 5 Community Organizing: Principal Tool for Change and Reform
Chapter 6 Participation: Lifeblood of Renewal
Chapter 7 Aliquippa: A Small Community on the Front Line
Chapter 8 Forging an Organizational Plan
Chapter 9 Unity in Creating a Comprehensive Community Plan
Chapter 10 Maximizing Social Strength
Chapter 11 Tapping Essential Resources
Chapter 12 Capital Formation: Building Community Financial Assets
Chapter 13 Neighborhood Preservation Through Affordable Housing
Chapter 14 Business District Renewal: Transforming Your Shopping Area
Chapter 15 Workforce Development: Strengthening the Economic Base of the Small Community
Chapter 16 Organizing for Community Controlled Development and the Promise of Coalition Politics
Index
About the Authors

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