The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain

The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain

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Overview

The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain by Maria Rosa Menocal

Widely hailed as a revelation of a "lost" golden age, this history brings to vivid life the rich and thriving culture of medieval Spain where, for more than seven centuries, Muslims, Jews, and Christians lived together in an atmosphere of tolerance, and literature, science, and the arts flourished. of photos. 3 maps.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316168717
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 04/02/2003
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 191,615
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.87(d)

About the Author

Maria Rosa Menocal (1953-2012) was a Cuban-born scholar of medieval culture and history and Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University. Menocal earned a BA, MA, and PhD from the University of Pennsylvania.

Tanya Eby has been a voice-over artist for over a decade. She is an Audie-nominated and AudioFile Earphones Award-winning narrator. Besides narrating, Tanya spends her time teaching creative writing classes at the collegiate level, blogging, and working on her own novels.

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Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
TeriMori More than 1 year ago
An excellent, beautifully written book about a complex period of history. Yes, it is slow reading, because the subject is a very detailed history; but it is important, and fascinating to understand this background to our current world. It is a shame that its rating is dragged down by an ignoramus like Mary-C, and 70% of a lazy book club looking for books with easier words. We all read for different reasons. Please be guided by the (more accurate) professional reviews regarding the worth of this book.
Alienor More than 1 year ago
I am researching Medieval Europe and this book had been very helpful. As I am of Spanish origins I knew of all this since school. This has been a great refresher course. Thank you to Ms. Menocal. I also recommend Women at Work in Medieval Europe, it is an eye opener for the many still believing the Middle Ages where a dark period.
SamiaK More than 1 year ago
Menocal does a great job of weaving together history and theory to tell the tale of life in Andalusia. This thought provoking story is well worth the read.
Marktavius More than 1 year ago
If you have been wondering recently whether Christians, Muslims, and Jews can ever live side by side in peace, harmony, and cooperation, this book gives a resounding answer in the affirmative. This is a beautifully written account of a time when Muslim-ruled Spain was the most sophisticated (and tolerant) place in the known world. The well-researched stories of some the individuals that made up that fascinating society are both inspirational and thought-provoking.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Seventy percent of my book club rejected this book, as too difficult to read. I agree that it is difficult, as her use of English is not for the average person. As an example, she used the word, 'risible', when 'laughable' is more readily understood. Another example of her grandiose language is the word 'hermeneutical', which means 'explanatory'. This will discourage many readers from acquiring the wealth of knowledge that this book contains. With the aid of the internet, this book has opened doors to history that I was not aware of, pertaining to the Arabic, Jewish, and Christian cultures of that period of time.
Mary-C More than 1 year ago
Wow. Besides the fact that it was mind-numbingly boring, this book was so factually inaccurate that at times I found myself wondering if it was a misguided attempt at humor in the form of a political satire.