Orthodoxy (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

Orthodoxy (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

Paperback

$8.95
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Wednesday, October 25 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.
    Same Day delivery in Manhattan. 
    Details

Overview

Orthodoxy (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) by G. K. Chesterton

Chesterton’s Orthodoxy is not an explanation “of whether the Christian Faith can be believed, but of how he personally has come to believe it.” He begins with a description of how he sets out to find a new anchor for his thought in an age of uncertainty and discovers at every step along the way that what he thought was new is exactly what the Church confesses in the Apostles’ Creed. While the motto of the modern world is “believe in yourself,” the movement of the Creed directs one’s belief outside oneself to a maker, a redeemer, and a sanctifier of heaven and earth—and to a community of believers. Chesterton notes that those “who really believe in themselves are all in lunatic asylums,” and this leads him to a remarkable exploration of madness, which he says is the absence, not of reason, but of imagination. Seeking freedom, he finds the Church—but he defines the Church, via the cross, as throwing its arms open rather than drawing a circle around itself.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780760786314
Publisher: Barnes & Noble
Publication date: 03/19/2007
Series: Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading
Pages: 176
Sales rank: 473,874
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x (d)

About the Author

G. K. Chesterton (1874–1936) was a larger-than-life writer who fascinates and perplexes us to this day. An art student who became a poet, and then by turns a journalist, playwright, biographer, novelist, philosopher, and Christian apologist, his fame rested on an uncanny ability to produce vast quantities of crystalline prose quickly and without apparent effort. His fiction—particularly the Father Brown stories and the delirious suspense novel The Man Who Was Thursday—remains his most widely read and entertaining works.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Orthodoxy 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 67 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Chesterton became my favorite author of all-time after I picked up this title about six months ago. While I would describe this book as 'dense' (in that it took me a long time to read it given its content), it is by far the most rewarding book I've read. In this Christian apologetic classic, Chesterton tackles a variety of issues and uses amazing language abilities (such a metaphor) to drive home his points. One of my favorite passages reads: 'Because children have abounding vitality...they want things repeated and unchanged. They always say, 'Do it again' and the grown-up person does it again until he is nearly dead. For grown-up people are not strong enough to exult in monotony. But perhaps God is strong enough to exult in monotony. It is possible that God says every morning, 'Do it again' to the sun and every evening 'Do it again' to the moon. It may not be automatic necessity that makes all daisies alike it may be that God makes every daisy separately, but has never gotten tired of making them.' He is very quotable and this book will get your reaching for not only more Chesterton titles, but the Bible as well! It has been a blessing to me, so I encourage all of you to read this indispensible classic!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is not at all what I expected when I bought it. I was expecting a discussion and, perhaps, an explanation of the orthodoxy of the Catholic Church. This book is actually an account of Chesterton's journey of faith. The style of writing, being very "old-fashioned" could be a little difficult to follow and distracting. (The book was written about 100 years ago.) That said, I was surprised at how current the topics and concerns were. When you got "into it" the book had a lot to say and was very informative. I would definitely recommend it to those who had done a bit of studying and reading about the Faith. I don't really think it is for beginners and some may find the style off-putting. My advice would be to just try to get past the language; if you do you will get a new understanding and perspective.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Apparently this is an compliment to Heretics. According to the preface he literally wrote this book when his friend asked him (after reading Heretics) what he thought the truth was. So he wrote this on a dare. 'Cause Chesterson is cool that way. I enjoyed this book. It's not a systematic exposition of Christianity or the doctrine of the Catholic church/ Church of England. (I believe he was Catholic. This man has FEELINGS and OPINIONS about the reformation in general and Calvinists in particular.) I don't really think it qualifies as apologetics either, at least not in a formal sense. It's more a general outline of the main things that moved him to accept Christianity as an adult. As always, it's lovely to read. The book is quite short. I was sad when it came to an end. I would have liked to read more.
Rebecca Bobo More than 1 year ago
well written, and a must read. this format does not include titles for the chapters in the table of contents though
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up several years ago, when a book I was reading (The Sacred Romance) kept quoting it. I am so grateful I did! I have reread this book several times over, and it really has shaped my moral landscape. Chesterton examines various systems of belief in an approachable, playful (and often rather sarcastic) way. He teaches by delighting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Chesterton's 'spiritual autobiography' is a fascinating look at a man who was prophetic in his outlook about mankind, spirituality, and philosophies that have been gutted of the Divine. He called the liberal theologians on their rejection of core doctrines such as original sin and hinted at where such tendencies would lead. The evolutionists, the Malthusians, ie, the 'spirit of the age' are all given a good shake down decades before some of the worst aspects of their philosophy would be obvious even to them. (For something even more prophetic, see Chesterton's book on eugenics). This edition had something that I hadn't seen before and that was an index. Though not comprehensive it is still fairly thorough and I have already used it to trace some of Chesterton's themes within the book. The edition in question is ISBN 9780979127663. Everyone should look for ways to introduce Chesterton to moderns- though they will be humbled to hear how much of their thought he anticipated. Orthodoxy is a great text for this purposes, and this version with an index would be a great edition to use.
inked More than 1 year ago
I have read Chesterton for a number of decades now and have read ORTHODOXY about once a decade since college (that's 3.5 times or so!). I decided to listen to it read by someone else. This production is excellent. Vance reads fluidly and with an strong range of tonality and inflection in the voice that provides flair and drama in keeping with the text's. I frankly found some of the readings so compelling that I listened to selected tracts as many as three time before continuing.

This was so well done that I should like a six to seven hour trip sheerly for the joy of listening to it again all at one go!

You will not go wrong with this audio production of ORTHODOXY.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This lucid defense of classic Christianity is never out of date -- in fact, it speaks to our time clearly and without apology. The extensive annotations enable the reader to follow along easily and with understanding. It also includes a helpful, and sometimes startling, introduction. Highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Basis of sanity for all in the post modern world. Some difficulties with the electronic copy, but a terribly wonderful book for the modern cynic and lost children of feminism.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago