Our Vietnam: The War 1954-1975

Our Vietnam: The War 1954-1975

by A. J. Langguth
4.7 6

Paperback(Reprint)

$17.28 $22.00 Save 21% Current price is $17.28, Original price is $22. You Save 21%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Thursday, January 25 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Our Vietnam: The War 1954-1975 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
latreeot More than 1 year ago
Great book on the U.S. politics behind the war but not a lot on the combat itself. Exposes all the black eyes of the U.S. actions but very little on Hanoi's. Typical stuff, journalist are heroes , U.S. servicemen are boobs
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
holomorph More than 1 year ago
I read this book in less than a week -- if it hadn't have been so long, I would have finished it much sooner -- but the book clearly needed that length to give the readers an idea of the thoughts behind the Vietnam War. The reader should understand that there was so much more to the war then they can ever conceive --- this book helps bring those thoughts to the surface. As you read this, you will become enlightened as to why the war went the way it did.....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read many many books on Vietnam and this book may be the most encompassing of all. A must read for all who wish to understand the Vietnam war. An easy, engrossing read. Deserves more than five stars.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 1968 'The New York Times' wrote, and recently reminded us when Norman Mailer published his, that A. J. Langguth has still produced the best novel about Christ as a man: 'Jesus Christs.' Along with two other fine novels, his Saki biography and extraordinarily readable but precise histories of the Revolutionay War in 'Patriots' and the Roman Wars in 'A Noise of War,' Langguth served his productive half-century preparation with a steady series of always well-reviewed, diverse, but not well-enough known books. Luckily, all that led to the last decade when he reconstructed his Vietnam years as reporter and 'Times' Saigon bureau chief, adding to exhaustive research and his experiences multiple trips back to Southeast Asia to find and interview many of the participants - including former adversaries from the North, who for the first time bring their slant to this kicked-about conflict. Langguth's diamond-decorous-aromatic prose makes the war read like a compelling novel of that tragic time. It tips the scale on the previous Viet War greats: Frances FitzGerald, David Halberstam, Neil Sheehan, Stanley Karnow - all of whom he credits. Why do our writers understand and show so much more than the politicians who make the messes?