Pabst An Excavation of Art

Pabst An Excavation of Art

by Paul Bialas

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Product Details

BN ID: 2940014787864
Publisher: PAUL BIALAS
Publication date: 05/29/2012
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 187
File size: 7 MB

About the Author

This project started as a coffee table book for myself, it has blown out of control as hundreds of books sold before I printed them. This is my first book and I'm glad you have taken the time to take a look.
This project has been a pleasure to work on and it shows in the photographs. 2 years, and over 10,000 photographs later I present to you Pabst, An Excavation of Art.


The following written by August U. Pabst
Welcome to a presentation of the remaining Milwaukee-based Pabst Brewing Company
buildings. With photogenic sensitivity, Paul has captured, not only in theme, but in spirit the
nostalgic presence of these historic buildings. It is with great pride and remembrance that
we dedicate these pages to those who staffed and produced Pabst products for over 150 years.

With the corrosion of time, many of these buildings have deteriorated in substance but not
in memory. While I am saddened with the passing of this era, I am overjoyed that with Paul’s
photography, “PBR” is visually retained as a pictorial for others to view and appreciate today.

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Pabst An Excavation of Art 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastic pictures of an era that has sadly passed. Introduction by August Pabst was fantastic. Great value over 150 beautiful photos..
BillBSeattle0 More than 1 year ago
parts of the brewery seem locked in time as captured by his great images. The insertion of a random PBR bottle or can, stickers from the 70s, etc bring a splash of color to the otherwise drab and depressing peeling paint and abandoned work spaces. A piece of brewing history we shouldn't forget.