Pachelbel: Vespers

Pachelbel: Vespers

by King's Singers

CD

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Product Details

Release Date: 03/30/2010
Label: Signum Uk
UPC: 0635212019825
catalogNumber: 198
Rank: 77481

Tracks

  1. Ingressus: Deus in adjutorium, for 4-part chorus, 2 violins, viola & continuo in C major, T. 391
  2. Magnificat, for 4-part chorus, 2 violins & continuo in G major "In Nomine Jesu", T. 421
  3. Sonata à 5 in G minor
  4. Ingressus: Deus in adjutorium, for 4-part chorus, 2 violins, 3 violas, bassoon & continuo in A minor, T. 402
  5. Ingressus: Deus in adjutorium, for 5-part chorus, 2 violins, 3 violas, bassoon & continuo in A major, T. 401
  6. Ingressus: Deus in adjutorium, for 5-part chorus, 2 violins, viola, 2 violas da gamba, bassoon & continuo in G minor, T. 400
  7. Sonata à 5 in A minor
  8. Magnificat, for 4-part chorus, 2 violins, 3 violas, bassoon, organ & continuo in E flat major, T. 418
  9. Ingressus: Deus in adjutorium, for 5-part chorus, 2 violins, 3 violas, bassoon & continuo in D minor, T. 396

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Pachelbel: Vespers 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
EddieKonczal More than 1 year ago
While Johann Pachelbel is rightly famous for his ubiquitous "Canon in D," he's posthumously struggled to gain recognition for his other works. In fact, I've seen at least two CD compilations of "Pachelbel's Greatest Hit" (emphasis on the singular) featuring various arrangements of - you guessed it - "Canon in D." Amazingly, none of Pachelbel's other compositions are canons, so the popularity of "Canon" paints an incomplete and misleading picture of this under-appreciated Baroque composer. Fortunately, "Pachelbel Vespers" seems set to change that. On this recording, The King's Singers collaborate with instrumental ensemble Charivari Agreable to revive these works "after three centuries of quiescence," as the liner notes go. The compositions, which feature settings in different keys of two sacred texts (the Ingressus and the Magnificat), demonstrate Pachelbel's skill in joining vocal music with orchestral forces in the style pioneered by earlier composers such as Monteverdi's operas and (perhaps more closely) Carissimi's oratorio, which unify prayer with entertainment much as Pachelbel does here. The instrumental sections are vibrant and lively, while the declamatory vocal passages convey the appropriate mood of plaintive urgency (in the Ingressus) or celebration (in the Magnificat) as befitting the text. (The emotional resonance of these works may have sprung from personal tragedy: Pachelbel had lost his first wife and son to the plague, and his second marriage produced a stillborn child.) The King's Singers imbue the declamatory vocal passages with passion and a sense of purpose, while Charivari Agreable perform the instrumentation with vivacity and authority. Instrumental works by Pachelbel's contemporaries Krieger and Kerll, featured as interludes, give the musicians further opportunity to shine. "Vespers" should help elevate Pachelbel above his undeserved "one-hit wonder" status, while heightening anticipation for further collaborations by these two remarkable ensembles.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago