Painters as Envoys: Korean Inspiration in Eighteenth-Century Japanese Nanga

Painters as Envoys: Korean Inspiration in Eighteenth-Century Japanese Nanga

by Burglind Jungmann

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Overview

Painters as Envoys: Korean Inspiration in Eighteenth-Century Japanese Nanga by Burglind Jungmann

It is well known that Japanese literati painting of the eighteenth century was inspired by Chinese styles that found their way to Japan through trade relations. However, because Japanese and American art historians have focused on Japanese-Chinese ties, the fact that Japan also maintained important diplomatic—and aesthetic—relations with Korea during the same period has long been neglected. This richly illustrated, cogently argued book examines the role of Korean embassies in shaping the new Japanese literati style, known as Nanga in Japan.

Burglind Jungmann describes the eighteenth-century Korean-Japanese diplomatic exchange and the circumstances under which Korean and Japanese painters met. Since diplomatic relations were conducted on both sides by scholars with a classical Chinese education, Korean envoys and their Japanese hosts shared a deep interest in Chinese philosophy, literature, calligraphy, and painting. Texts, such as Ike Taiga's letter to Kim Yusöng and Gion Nankai's poem for Yi Hyön, and accounts by Korean and Japanese diplomats, give a vivid picture of the interaction between Korean and Japanese painters and envoys. Further, the paintings done by Korean painters during their sojourns in Japan attest to the transmission of a distinctly Korean literati style, called Namjonghwa. By comparing Korean, Japanese, and Chinese paintings, the author shows how the Korean interpretation of Chinese styles influenced Japanese literati painters and helped inspire the creation of their new style.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780691114637
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Publication date: 09/20/2004
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 272
Product dimensions: 8.30(w) x 10.30(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Burglind Jungmann is Associate Professor of Korean Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her previous book, on the Chinese influence on sixteenth-century Korean painting, was published in Germany in 1992.

Table of Contents

Preface 7
Introduction 13

Part I: Historical Conditions and the Origin of the Style

Chapter One: Korean Embassies to japan in the Eighteenth Century 25
Chapter Two: Southern School Painting in China, Korea, and Japan 47

Part II: The Nanga Pioneers and Their Relationahip with Korea

Chapter Three: Gion Nankai and the Korean Embassy of 1741 75
Chapter Four: Sakaki Hyakusen, Yanagisawa Kien, and the An Kyōn School Style 103

Part III: The Second Generation: Ike Taiga and the Impact of Korean Namjonghwa

Chapter Five: Ike Taiga's Circle and the Korean Embassies 121
Chapter Six: Korean Influence on Ike Taiga's Painting Style 167
Chapter Seven: Korean True Scenery Painting and Its Spread to japan 187

Conclusion: Korean Contributions to the Creation of the Nanga Style 205
List of Characters 212
Appendix: Korean and Japanese Texts 219
Notes 223
Bibliography 253
Index 266
Photography Credits 272

What People are Saying About This

Timon Screech

This is an important book that will be useful to scholars and students alike. In elegant prose and with excellent scholarship, Burglind Jungmann proposes that Korean amateur painting had a large impact in Japan. This point has never been so closely argued before, in any language. The author has been diligent in finding little-known works in many collections around the world to support her claims. This is the first book on the subject, but it is much more than an introductory work.
Timon Screech, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and Sainsbury Institute

Stephen Addiss

Excellent. This book is a detailed and informative study of a topic that has long been neglected: the Korean influence on Japanese literati painting. Professor Jungmann's research is insightful and will make a major contribution to the field of Japanese art and cultural history.
Stephen Addiss, University of Richmond, author of "How to Look at Japanese Art".

Recipe

"Excellent. This book is a detailed and informative study of a topic that has long been neglected: the Korean influence on Japanese literati painting. Professor Jungmann's research is insightful and will make a major contribution to the field of Japanese art and cultural history."—Stephen Addiss, University of Richmond, author of How to Look at Japanese Art.

"This is an important book that will be useful to scholars and students alike. In elegant prose and with excellent scholarship, Burglind Jungmann proposes that Korean amateur painting had a large impact in Japan. This point has never been so closely argued before, in any language. The author has been diligent in finding little-known works in many collections around the world to support her claims. This is the first book on the subject, but it is much more than an introductory work."—Timon Screech, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and Sainsbury Institute

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