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Paper Tiger: An Obsessed Golfer's Quest to Play with the Pros
     

Paper Tiger: An Obsessed Golfer's Quest to Play with the Pros

4.2 7
by Tom Coyne
 

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?Think country-club clinic meets Navy Seals training. I will pay any price, bear any burden, leave my home to follow the seasons, build my own swing studio in the basement, construct a practice green in my backyard. . . . Everything the big boys have access to, I want double.? Like most amateur golfers, Tom Coyne had often wondered whether the pros won because

Overview

?Think country-club clinic meets Navy Seals training. I will pay any price, bear any burden, leave my home to follow the seasons, build my own swing studio in the basement, construct a practice green in my backyard. . . . Everything the big boys have access to, I want double.? Like most amateur golfers, Tom Coyne had often wondered whether the pros won because they were more talented or because they were more obsessed. Overweight and burdened by a 14 handicap, he decided to find out for himself what it takes to play like a pro.

Charting his journey?which included hiring top golf gurus such as Dr. Jim Suttie?Paper Tiger takes readers from the Michelob tournament (a win for Tom) to the Australian Tour, where forty-mile-per-hour winds and a driving rain scare off his Japanese partners. With each chapter, he tracks his weight alongside his handicap, pursuing his dream with a reckless abandon that comes to involve hardcore diets, pricey technology, even psychologists. With echoes of Dead Solid Perfect and Who?s Your Caddy? Tom brings his uniquely edgy, deeply human perspective to a game that can simultaneously bring out the best and the worst in everyone who tries to master it.

Editorial Reviews

Philadelphia Inquirer
Abreezy, poignant read.... Hilarious.
The Seattle Times
Superb.... Coyne has a lot to say about golf, and he says it well.
Golfweek
From his commitment to the curious cause to his single-minded focus, Coyne weaves an insightful and entertaining tale....[H]is self-deprecating writing style and impeccable comedic timing make Paper Tiger a tale worth reading.
Publishers Weekly
The title is a sly acknowledgment on Coyne's part of the karmic debt his memoir owes to George Plimpton, but while Plimpton merely finagled his way onto the PGA Tour, Coyne (A Gentleman's Game) sets himself a higher goal: by dedicating a solid year to improving his golf game, he hopes to actually pass the qualifying school tournament that would allow him to compete as a professional. Believing that the difference between good and great golfers is consistency, Coyne moves to Florida for the winter for intensive training with swing doctors and sports psychologists, staying out on the course until his hands bleed. He faces the inevitable (and sometimes unexpected) setbacks with resigned humor, as he comes to realize that his year's age difference with Tiger Woods is the only thing he'll have in common with the champ. (In fact, it takes all the skill he can muster not to wind up DFL-"Dead Fucking Last.") Coyne treads a fine line between sarcasm and sympathy in his observations of his competitors, and though he occasionally gets lost in big-picture ruminations, his quest should resonate with weekend golfers who dream of going all the way. (June) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
This is Coyne's (A Gentleman's Game) diary of his yearlong quest to become a professional golfer. In The Old Man and the Tee, Turk Pipkin documented a similar journey, the notable difference being that Pipkin had financial resources. Coyne, on the other hand, had to empty his bank account and run up his credit card to accomplish his mission. With instruction from former PGA Teacher of the Year Dr. Jim Suttie, Coyne went from a 9.4 to a +0.4 handicap. What he discovered is that, with effort, dreams can come true. Talent is one thing-lots of people have it. Ambition is another. But lots of people have ambition, too. Commitment and effort-these are the two key qualities that Coyne demonstrates in his quest. It is hard not to be jealous of him, but it is a jealousy hard-earned. Truth be told, the real hero of the book is Allyson, Coyne's girlfriend, who demonstrates the kind of support one could only hope for in a significant other. This is an experience readers will be able to enjoy vicariously. Recommended for all public libraries.-Steven Silkunas, North Wales, PA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781592402991
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/03/2007
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
575,798
Product dimensions:
5.32(w) x 7.97(h) x 0.71(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are Saying About This

Mark Frost
For anyone who's ever suffered the delusion they have enough game to go up against the professional killers who play golf for a living, here's the cold, hilarious truth. (Mark Frost, author of The Greatest Game Ever Played and The Grand Slam)
From the Publisher

From his commitment to the curious cause to his single-minded focus, Coyne weaves an insightful and entertaining tale. . . .[H]is self-deprecating writing style and impeccable comedic timing make Paper Tiger a tale worth reading. (Golfweek)

Meet the Author

Tom Coyne is the author of the novel A Gentleman’s Game and cowriter of the screenplay for the novel’s film version, which starred Dylan Baker and Gary Sinise. He is a contributor to Golf Magazine and teaches creative writing at St. Joseph’s University.

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Paper Tiger: An Obsessed Golfer's Quest to Play with the Pros 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
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