Paragon Walk

Paragon Walk

by Anne Perry
4.0 12

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Paragon Walk 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Having read most of the Thomas and Charlotte Pitt mysteries, Paragon Walk is right in line with the series. Anne Perry does a great job weaving the social fabric of the Victorian world into a great mystery. The plot takes twists and turns and keeps the reader guessing until the end. If you want a Victorian murder mystery that captures the full flavor of the times, you can't go wrong with Paragon Walk. The only minor drawback is that Thomas Pitt is not as "involved" as in the other novels, which allows us a great chance the see Charlotte and her sister Emily in full action.
AustenStudent More than 1 year ago
London Inspector Thomas Pitt’s father was employed in service and he had the good fortune to have a gentleman’s education, as he went to school with the master’s son. In this, the third mystery in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series, we see Pitt’s wife, Charlotte, settling into her new and very different life as a wife and mother, a life without servants, where she must cook her own meals and take care of her own children. She gets some respite when she visits her younger and more privileged sister, Emily, in Paragon Walk, an affluent London neighborhood. She once again wears pretty dresses, eats fancy and delicious food, and mingles in high society, noticing some things she misses, but with a twinge of conscience. "In the still heat it was delicious just to contemplate the cold soups, fresh salmon with minute cold vegetables, ices, sherbets and fruit. She was halfway through eating it, elegantly, as if she ate such things every day, when she remembered Pitt would probably be chewing through heavy bread sandwiches with a little cold meat in them, if he was fortunate, if not, then cheese, dry and clogging in the mouth.” (p56) What is most interesting about this series (and is the reason I read it) is how the mystery is not so much solved by the reader observing Thomas Pitt in action but, rather, by the observations and interactions of the characters. It’s more a case of what isn’t said or done. And, in the process, the reader learns about the mores and strictures of Victorian society. It’s a plot-driven mystery series but the characters and their thoughts and actions are intriguing. Aunt Vespasia—love these old names—is George’s aunt—George is Pitt’s brother-in-law and Emily’s husband—is an outspoken and direct older woman who has no trouble giving her opinions.  ”’My dear girl, everyone has secrets, unless they have lived no life at all. And even they, poor souls, imagine they have. It is almost an admission of defeat not to have a secret of some kind.’” (p126) The odd mores of the Victorian period comes through with Emily, pregnant with her first child, feeling that she doesn’t yet know her husband well enough to go into his room in the middle of the night. They obviously have sex, but there is no emotional intimacy. “More than once she considered getting up and going to him, to ask him why he was pacing, what worried him so much. But she did not yet feel she knew him well enough to take the rather forward action of going into his room at two o’clock in the morning. She knew he would consider it ingenuous, even immodest.” (p152) Perry aptly portrays Victorian society in a fascinating and educational way, including how women who are raped are considered of low moral character and the mention of the murder of General Gordon. My only complaint, and it’s a minor one considering the fascinating things that happen in the stories, is that the ending is always abrupt and, so far, all the killers are women. What does that tell us?
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Delphimo More than 1 year ago
I am on a collision course and I cannot stop. I have read all the Monk and Christmas series by Anne Perry, and have started on the Thomas and Charlotte Pitt series. The Monk series remains my favorite collection. The Pitt series lacks the depth and character of the Monk series, even though both series feature the different classes of people. Perry continues in the Pitt series to show the hate and vengeance of females. Perry elegantly describes the fashion of the upper crust, but emotion hides in this elegance.
kaat60 More than 1 year ago
This is an awesome book. I truly enjoy the Pitt,s.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What began as an interesting series has become tiresome. Once again we hear the same trials and tribulations of our heroine as she skips between high society and her own meager life. The society ladies are up to their same silly ways. I can't count the different number of ways someone 'colors' or flushes with emotion. The plot is as lifeless as the victim and the ending is just a neatly wrapped conclusion. This is the last of this series that I will have wasted my time with...