Paris to the Moon

Paris to the Moon

by Adam Gopnik
3.6 30

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Paris to the Moon 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Being Parisian myself, and in US for 5 years it is a great pleasure to read about my hometown and its way of life, seen through the eyes of an outsider. It is a delight of truths about the city's synergie, about the french culture, and about a foreigner who wants to understand and integrate a new world, but will always be on the edge of it. Believe me, the challenges are incredibly similar whem you are a Parisian living in Boston, or New York!! This book gave me a lesson of humility about my culture and let me know that the same confusions, frustrations and joys are shared by anyone who has the chance to live in another culture.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The author is the kind of traveler who makes other American travelers cringe, and in just a few years, he has evidently become the kind of self-absorbed New Yorker who is unloved everywhere. Instead of embracing the experience of living in a new country, he is a rude guest, constantly commenting on his hosts' shortcomings. This is an irritatingly self-indulgent story on an old subject, done before by many other better writers. There is nothing new or original here. I cannot understand the reviews. As for the pretense of being a concerned parent wanting to get his child away from American culture...PLEASE...if he was tortured by his son's obsession with Barney, it's because he brought Barney there in his suitcase! This family eventually leaves France, commenting that they do not "live a full life" there...Not surprising, they live outside, and stay outside Parisian life. I kept hoping for some real contact with the French, some insight. Something other than an experience with a local shop keeper or taxi cab driver. But this is someone whose first actions in Paris included hooking up American cable in his apartment. He learns that you can get a wonderful apartment in Paris...it just takes money and connections. He winds up with a beautiful place on the Left Bank... a typical expat experience... I have met these "journalists" before. They live in Paris, Rome, Beiruit, Bejing...yet somehow manage to never leave their comfort zone. How very boring.
Wanderluster More than 1 year ago
Paris to the Moon was only marginally enjoyable for me. Travel memoirs are my favorite genre, French/Parisian travel in particular, so I appreciated the book to that extent. But overall, the writing style and choice of topics left something to be desired. Gopnik writes in an irritatingly halting fashion that left me frustrated and wishing that he would just get to the point of his every sentence. Also, as someone who knows a bit of French from high school and college, I was able to understand his occasional use of the language, but I imagine his frequent failure to include translations would prove quite cumbersome for anyone unfamiliar with French. To be perfectly honest, the book was just flat out boring at points...maybe because I'm not all that interested in French soccer or politics. I did enjoy the culinary descriptions and first-hand accounts of European health care. But on a scale of one to ten, I'd give its page-turning factor a three.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a college student I lived in Paris for a year and have been a frequent visitor to Paris before and after my year of study. I was hoping this book would take me back to my life that I long to return to. At times it does, but most of the time is spent reading about redundant gibberish. It was not worth reading and frequently skimmed through it hoping the writing would improve.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you find Gopnik's toddler son as relentlessly fascinating as he apparently does, you might like this book. But if you're not an immediate family member, the 'ain't-my-kid-cute' stories will quickly tire you, as may Gopnik's tendency to pull forced French-American comparisons out of every last croissant crumb. While there are some good and pointed insights to be found, much of it comes off as a smug Manhattan boor holding forth, instead of a witty and knowledeable correspondent who learned to live with the French. And as a chronicle of someone who spent a whole five years in Paris, it's oddly insular and remote: one wonders why Gopnik's relations with Parisians never progressed past the most fleeting casual kind (a taxi driver, a waiter) that any one-time tourist could have had. Want a real feeling of being an American living in Paris - read Janet Flanner.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The most pretentious and self-aggrandizing essayist in the US takes on Paris. It's like mixing arsenic with hemlock. This is drivel from the first word to the last. Read Janet Flanner instead. THAT is the real McCoy, and this is French hogwash.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have lived in Paris for the past ten years. I have lived in every district excluding maybe three, I, along with other American and British friends have worked in restaurants, bars, temp work, and in major corporations. Every neighborhood has a different atmosphere and every work place as well, Mr. Gopnik's book is a very typical New Yorker's view of the world, which is narrow minded. NY is not the center of the world and everything does not need to be compared it it, especially by a man who lived in the same area all five years of his stay and never lived or worked with French people. Sorry, not only is the book boring, with its chapters on a fax machine and fax paper, but the fatherhood thing was common as well and how rude to come install your self and critize a place that never need your opion. Paris is a little hop over the Atlantic, NOT the moon! To relish over the differences without end it maybe interesting for someone undertravelled, but as for the rest of us, it is relly a disappointment and I will try to get a refund at the boutique I purchased it from.
Hal_OBrien More than 1 year ago
The book certainly has its charms. As does Mr Gopnik. It's fun reading of his dilemmas regarding his kids, because they edge towards being more French as the years go by while they live in Paris, and while Gopnik likes the breadth that gives them, he also realizes they have to go back to the US eventually. It's interesting to watch the balancing act. One image that sticks with me from this book is how if the French had a magazine akin to "The New Yorker," (for whom Gopnik wrtites) they'd have theory-checkers rather than fact-checkers. This is because Gopnik thinks the French see facts as mutable depending on one's point-of-view, so what really matters is the consistency of one's theories. The ironic thing, of course, is that by this measure the George W. Bush Administration was far and away the most French in American history.
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This was a present for my niece. She is a complete Paris buff. She loved it!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I absolutely loved Paris to the Moon! It was an amazing book with an extraordinary dry sense of humor. It didn't glamorize Paris and told Paris as it is romantic but sometimes confusing charming and frustrating. I had some trouble at the beginning when the topic was French politics and I didn't know the people involved so found it difficult to relate to. However once I gone pass that bit the book was thoroughly enjoyable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up at a Parisian English bookshop. I read it in bits and pieces during my 6-week stay. Any American who has spent any time in Paris will appreciate this true life tale. Using his son's birth & growth as a backdrop for his story, Gopnik weaves a tapestry of his own complex attraction and involvement in Paris life and culture (from joining a gym to becoming embroiled in labor dispute at his favorite restaurant to the French birthing experience). Gopnik highlights the cultural differences and challenges using his son's years-long attempt at merry-go-round ring chasing as a metaphor for his own growth and understanding of that growth. The book is about a love affair of sorts with a city and a people that Gopnik does not always understand or like but that he loves and appreciates for adding dimension - not only to his life ¿ but also to that of his family. Ultimately, Gopnik's decision about whether to remain in Paris revolves completely around his decision to either raise a French child or an American one who speaks fluent French and eats croissants and lox instead of Cheerios. A delightful read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Adam Gopnick moves his wife and infant son to Paris from New York City. He works for the New Yorker so all this is possible. And although the book at times is just hilarious, funny, and insightful, many of the chapters read like they were separate New Yorker articles. There is a wonderful story of his trying to first find a gym to join, and then joining process and then the discovery of how the French use the gym. This little gem may be worth the price of the book alone. But later I found an ¿article¿ on the fashion industry just boring. I found the book to be a very uneven read that I could only recommend to persons going to visit or live in France.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was simply transported by this beautiful memoir. As a former (American) au pair/student in Paris, I recognize the places, the emotions, the thoughts, the feelings, and the questions which Gopnik writes about. As a subscriber to 'The New Yorker', I recognize that wonderful writing style that is Gopnik's: every paragraph is its own little essay, and not a sentence should be missed. The book is now (sadly) put away on a shelf, but I still envision little Luke saying, 'ça va, Swimmy??'... and understand exactly why he said it. A great book!