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Patsy's Italian Family Cookbook
     

Patsy's Italian Family Cookbook

by Sal Scognamillo, Ben Stiller (Foreword by)
 

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Patsy's Restaurant, so famous for its classic Neapolitan Italian food that Frank Sinatra used to fly his favorite dishes from its kitchen to his gigs, has had three chefs since it was founded in 1944: Patsy, his son Joe, and his grandson Sal Scognamillo. The three passed down family recipes, invented great new twists on beloved classics, and emphasized giving

Overview

Patsy's Restaurant, so famous for its classic Neapolitan Italian food that Frank Sinatra used to fly his favorite dishes from its kitchen to his gigs, has had three chefs since it was founded in 1944: Patsy, his son Joe, and his grandson Sal Scognamillo. The three passed down family recipes, invented great new twists on beloved classics, and emphasized giving their diners-many of them celebrities-exactly what they wanted to eat.

Patsy's Italian Family Cookbook features recipes we really want to eat-and can easily make at home, including:

- Meatballs!
- Pasta with Lentils
- Penne alla Vodka with Shrimp
- Pork Scaloppine alla Vodka
- Chicken Pizzaola
- Chicken Liver Cacciatore
- Bass Puttanesca
- Stuffed Veal Chop
- Patsy's Famous Onion Relish
- Stuffed Zeppole
- Tiramisu
- Lemon Ricotta Cheesecake

A big, warm, beautiful Italian cookbook with full color throughout, Patsy's Italian Family Cookbook is a great book for those who know the restaurant, and the nationally distributed sauce and pasta line, but also for those who love classic Italian.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
12/01/2014
Founded in 1944, Patsy’s is one of New York City’s most famous restaurants. The food was so good that Frank Sinatra used to order meals and have them flown to his performances throughout the country. Sal Scognamillo, grandson of the titular Patsy, takes readers into the kitchen once again to share some of the restaurant’s iconic dishes, as well as some of his family favorites. (A decade ago, Scognamillo wrote Patsy’s Cookbook, also based on the restaurant.) Diners and readers alike will be struck by the accessibility of classic dishes such as pasta fagioli, osso buco, and spaghetti and veal meatballs (ground veal is the key, Scognamillo asserts) that have had regulars raving for years, but it’s the family recipes that are the real jewels here. Scognamillo’s grandmother’s Italian wedding soup, his cousin Connie’s potato pie with prosciutto and sopressata, and Scognamillo’s Italian sausage and bacon stuffing, served every year at Thanksgiving, give warmth and personality to the book. Another highlight is Scognamillo’s seafood-based menu for the Feast of the Seven Fishes, an Italian tradition on Christmas Eve. The attention to detail for potato croquettes or St. Joseph’s bread may come across as rather wordy, but Scognamillo patiently guides readers through every step of preparation, distinguishing this from many Italian cookbooks already on the market. Even if readers have never set foot in Patsy’s, they’ll feel as if they’ve spent an afternoon in the kitchen with an old friend. (Mar.)
From the Publisher

“Even if readers have never set foot in Patsy's, they'll feel as if they've spent an afternoon in the kitchen with an old friend.” —Publisher's Weekly

“As a kid, Patsy's always seemed fancy to me: a place where the waiters were impeccably dressed, and everyone paid incredible attention to detail. But despite its formality, the overwhelming feeling I got whenever we visited Patsy's was the warmth, and the way we were always made to feel special. Everyone who came to Patsy's for dinner--famous or not--was treated like family.” —Ben Stiller, from the Foreword

“Patsy's is my home away from home. When I miss my Nona's cooking, only one place can compare. They are wonderful people who have become like family and I will be a fan for life.” —Michael Buble

“Whenever I want an authentic home-cooked meal, I go to Patsy's.” —Sean Combs

“Sal is one of New York's most familiar restaurant chefs and his food is beloved by many. I have had the good fortune to have Sal on my show where he cooked his tasty clams oreganata and baccala salad, demonstrating why Patsy's is one of New York's favorite eateries. I look forward to trying all of the recipes in his new book.” —Martha Stewart

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781250039392
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
03/24/2015
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
190,642
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.80(d)

Read an Excerpt

Patsy's Italian Family Cookbook


By Sal J. Scognamillo, Jeffrey Gurwin

St. Martin's Press

Copyright © 2015 Sal J. Scognamillo
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-250-03939-2



CHAPTER 1

Antipasti


Meatball-tini
Seasoned Bread Crumbs
Mussels with White Wine and Lemon
Baked Clams
Mussels Marinara
Shrimp Casino
Eggplant Caponata
Eggplant Bruschetta
Eggplant Rollatini
Bruschetta with Baked Figs and Gorgonzola


Meatball-tini

MAKES 6 TO 8 APPETIZER SERVINGS


Our customers love appetizers almost as much as they love martinis, so I combined the two favorites to create the Meatball-tini. These mini meatballs (they are no bigger than a thimble) go down easy, and I can eat them like candy. They are used in both the Neapolitan Meatball and Rice Pie and Meatball Lasagna.



MEATBALL-TINI

¾ cup fresh bread crumbs
½ cup whole milk
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped
6 garlic cloves, finely chopped
3 pounds ground veal
1½ cups freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (about 6 ounces)
3 large eggs
3 large egg yolks, beaten
3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley, plus more for garnish
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh oregano, or 1 teaspoon dried
2½ teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 cups Seasoned Bread Crumbs or Italian-flavored store-bought dried bread
crumbs, for dusting
Olive oil, for deep-frying
3 cups Vodka Sauce (see here), heated
Pimiento-stuffed green olives, speared onto toothpicks, for garnish


1. To make the mini meatballs: Put the bread crumbs in a small bowl, drizzle with the milk, and let soak and soften for a few minutes.

2. Heat the oil in a large deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook until they are lightly browned, 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer to a plate and let cool.

3. Using your hands, mix the veal, soaked bread crumbs, and the onion mixture in a large bowl. Add the grated cheese, whole eggs, egg yolks, parsley, oregano, salt, and pepper and mix again until combined.

4. Dust the work surface with about ½ cup of the seasoned bread crumbs. On the bread crumbs, shape about ¾ cup of the meatball mixture into a 1-inch-wide strip. Sprinkle the top of the strip with more seasoned bread crumbs. Cut the strip into ½- to ¾-inch lengths. Transfer the pieces to a large sieve or strainer and sprinkle lightly with bread crumbs to prevent sticking. Rotate the sieve in a circulation motion to toss the strips of meat and form marble-size meatballs. Transfer the meatballs to a baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining meat mixture and bread crumbs.

5. Preheat the oven to 200°F. Line a baking sheet with paper towels and place near the stove.

6. Pour enough oil into a large deep skillet to come 1 inch up the sides. Heat the oil over high heat to 360°F. Working in batches without crowding, and adding more oil as needed, deep-fry the meatballs until browned and cooked through, about 1½ minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to the paper towel–lined baking sheet. Keep the cooked meatballs warm in the oven while frying the rest. (The meatballs can be cooled, packed into 1-gallon plastic storage bags, and refrigerated for up to 2 days or frozen for up to 2 months. Reheat in a 350°F oven for about 10 minutes before using.)

7. For each serving, place a portion of the meatballs in a martini glass. Garnish with parsley and green olives on spears. Serve ramekins of the vodka sauce on the side for dipping the meatballs.


* Seasoned Bread Crumbs *

MAKES ABOUT 2 CUPS

This is one of the "secret ingredients" in Patsy's kitchens, and a recipe that every Italian grandmother knows by heart. It takes day-old bread and mixes it with a few ingredients to become something special, an all-purpose ingredient that can be used as a coating, binder, and even toasted as a pasta topping. The crumbs keep for a few days in the refrigerator.

8 ounces stale Italian bread (about ½ small loaf), cut into large chunks

¼ cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
1 garlic clove, minced
½ teaspoon dried oregano
3 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper


Process the bread chunks in a food processor until they form fine crumbs. (Or process the bread in a blender in batches.) Transfer to a large bowl. Add the parsley, grated cheese, garlic, and oregano and mix well. Gradually stir in the oil to thoroughly moisten the crumbs. Season to taste with salt and pepper. (The crumbs can be refrigerated in a 1-gallon zip- top plastic bag for up to 5 days.)


Mussels with White Wine and Lemon

MAKES 4 APPETIZER SERVINGS

A bowl of plump mussels in a fragrant sauce is a great way to start a meal. This sauce is especially good, and you won't want to waste a drop, so be sure to serve the mussels with toasted bread for sopping.

2 pounds cultivated mussels, such as Prince Edward Island (see Note)
2 cups cold water
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
8 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced
¼ cup dry white wine
1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 scallions (white and green parts), thinly sliced
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
½ teaspoon dried oregano
Freshly ground black pepper
Sliced Italian bread, toasted in a broiler or on a grill, for serving


1. Put the mussels in a large pot and add the water. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat. Cook just until the shells open, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the opened mussels to a colander, discarding any unopened mussels. Reserve the cooking liquid.

2. Line a wire strainer with moistened paper towels and set over medium bowl. Strain the cooking liquid through the strainer. Measure and reserve 2 cups of the strained liquid. (You can cool, cover, and freeze the remaining mussel cooking liquid for another use or as a fish stock.) Wash and dry the pot.

3. Heat the oil and garlic together in pot over medium heat, stirring often, until the garlic is golden. Add the reserved cooking liquid along with the wine, lemon juice, scallions, parsley, and oregano. Bring to a boil over high heat and cook until the sauce has thickened lightly, about 3 minutes. Season to taste with pepper. Add the mussels, cover, and cook until reheated, about 3 minutes more.

4. Using tongs, divide the mussels evenly among four soup bowls, and ladle in the sauce. Serve hot, with the toasted bread.

NOTE: Cultivated mussels just need to be rinsed before cooking. For wild mussels, using pliers, pull off and discard the hairy "beards" sticking out of the shells, then scrub and soak them in a big pot of salted ice water for an hour or two, then drain. After cooking, when straining the liquid, leave any grit behind at the bottom of the pot.


Baked Clams

MAKES 4 APPETIZER SERVINGS

Here's a recipe for juicy clams topped with crisp crumbs that has been served at Patsy's since the first day that Grandpa opened the doors. Scognamillo family lore says that these were the first seafood that I ever ate. (I can't argue with my mother's memory, although I bet it was fried calamari.) Even though these are called baked, they are really broiled. Unless you have someone in your life who is an experienced clam shucker, buy the clams on the half shell the day you plan to cook them.

24 Littleneck clams, shucked with the meat on the half shell
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 cups Seasoned Bread Crumbs
¼ cup olive oil, for drizzling
2 lemons, cut into wedges


1. Position a rack about 8 inches from the heat source and preheat the broiler on high.

2. Season the clams very lightly with salt and pepper. Spoon the bread crumbs into the shells and smooth with the back of a spoon. Arrange the stuffed clam shells in a single layer in a broiler pan. Drizzle lightly with the olive oil to moisten the crumbs.

3. Broil until the bread crumbs are lightly browned, 2 to 3 minutes. Serve hot with the lemon wedges.


"The food at Patsy's is always so fresh and delicious. A great combo of the southern Italian food that we enjoy on our travels and the Italian-American cuisine of my New York childhood."

—Michael Kors



Mussels Marinara

MAKES 4 SERVINGS

Seafood in tomato sauce has a long history in Neapolitan cooking. In fact, marinara sauce is named for the mariners who supposedly created it. As mussels were plentiful and cheap in both Italy and America, my grandparents made this at home often. We serve it at the restaurant, too, usually over linguine as a pasta or main course. As an antipasto, serve it with crusty bread ... but I didn't really have to tell you that, did I?

2 pounds cultivated mussels, such as Prince Edward Island (see Note)
2 cups cold water
2 cups Tomato Sauce
2 tablespoons dry white wine
2 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
Pinch of dried oregano
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Sliced Italian bread, preferably toasted in a broiler or on a grill, for serving


1. Put the mussels in a large pot and add the water. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat. Cook just until the shells open, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the opened mussels to a colander, discarding any unopened mussels. Reserve the cooking liquid.

2. Line a wire strainer with moistened paper towels and set over medium bowl. Strain the cooking liquid through the strainer. Measure and reserve ½ cup of the strained liquid. (You can cool, cover, and freeze the remaining mussel cooking liquid for another use or as a fish stock.) Wash and dry the pot.

3. Bring the reserved cooking liquid, the tomato sauce, wine, parsley, and oregano to a boil over high heat. Cook, stirring often, until reduced to 2 cups, about 5 minutes. Add the mussels, cover, and cook until the mussels are reheated, about 3 minutes more. Season again with salt and pepper. Divide the mussels and sauce evenly among four soup bowls. Serve hot, with the toasted bread.


Mussels Marinara with Linguine

Use 3 cups Tomato Sauce, ¼ cup dry white wine, and ¾ cup cooking liquid. Boil for 5 minutes, or until reduced to about 3½ cups. Use as a sauce for 1 pound cooked linguine. Top each serving with mussels.


Shrimp Casino

MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS

We have customers who love our clams casino, but we also have some who don't like shellfish. This gives shrimp lovers a chance to enjoy the crispy topping on their favorite crustacean. This topping is very flavorful with extra helpings of bacon, pimientos, and Parmigiano.

24 colossal (U-15) shrimp, peeled, deveined, and butterflied
2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for brushing
1 small yellow onion, chopped
Two 6.5-ounce jars pimientos, drained
8 slices bacon: 2 slices coarsely chopped, and 6 slices cut into 24 pieces
½ cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (about 2 ounces)
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, at room temperature
Salt and freshly ground black pepper


1. Heat the oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, until lightly browned, about 4 minutes.

2. Transfer the onion to a food processor. Add the drained pimientos, chopped bacon, grated cheese, parsley, and butter and pulse until the bacon is finely chopped.

3. Position the broiler rack about 6 inches from the heat source and preheat the broiler on high. Lightly oil a broiler pan.

4. Arrange the shrimp, cut side down, with the tail sticking up, on the broiler pan. Spoon the pimiento mixture over the shrimp, dividing it equally. Broil until the exposed shrimp begins to turn opaque, about 1½ minutes. Remove the pan from the broiler. Season the shrimp with salt and pepper and top each with a piece of bacon. Return to the broiler and cook until the bacon is brown and crisp, about 2 minutes more. Serve hot.


Eggplant Caponata

MAKES 8 SERVINGS

My grandmother Concetta would start her array of antipasti with homemade eggplant caponata. Whenever I spread caponata on bread, I can't help but think of those days in Queens. When I make it now, I roast the eggplants, a change from the traditional frying method. Some people serve caponata chilled, but our family prefers it warm.

2 medium eggplants (about 1 pound each), trimmed, cut into ½-inch cubes
Olive oil, as needed
2 cups Tomato Sauce
½ cup coarsely chopped pitted kalamata olives
8 anchovy fillets in oil, finely chopped
2 tablespoons drained nonpareil capers, rinsed
½ cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (about 2 ounces)
1/3 cup plain dried bread crumbs
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 loaf Italian bread, sliced and toasted in a broiler or on the grill


1. Position two racks in the oven and preheat the oven to 450°F.

2. Spread the eggplant on 2 large rimmed baking sheets. Drizzle and toss the eggplant with oil to coat evenly. Roast, occasionally turning the eggplant, until the cubes are tender and golden brown, about 25 minutes.

3. Bring the tomato sauce to a boil in a large saucepan over high heat. Stir in the olives, anchovies, and capers. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer, uncovered, to blend the flavors for 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the eggplant and simmer for 2 minutes more.

4. Transfer the eggplant mixture to a large bowl. Stir in the cheese, bread crumbs, and parsley. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

5. Serve warm, spreading the caponata on the toasted bread.


Eggplant Bruschetta

MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS

The original bruschetta started with a slice of toasted bread, topped with juicy tomatoes. My version uses sliced eggplant instead of the bread. You'll love this twist on the old favorite.


TOPPING

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 garlic cloves, crushed through a press
1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 pound ripe plum tomatoes, coarsely chopped
4 scallions (white and green parts), thinly sliced
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup chopped fresh basil

½ cup all-purpose flour
3 large eggs
1½ cups plain dried bread crumbs
1 medium globe eggplant (about 1¼ pounds), trimmed, peeled, and cut
into 12 rounds about ½ inch thick
¾ cup olive oil, or as needed, for frying


1. To make the topping: Whisk the vinegar and garlic together in a large bowl. Gradually whisk in the extra-virgin olive oil. Add the tomatoes and scallions and mix gently. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and let stand at room temperature for at least 1 and up to 3 hours to blend the flavors. Just before serving, stir in the basil.

2. Spread the flour on a large plate. Beat the eggs together in a shallow bowl. Spread the bread crumbs on a second large plate. One at a time, coat an eggplant round with flour, dip in the eggs, and coat with the bread crumbs. Shake to remove excess coating and set on a baking sheet.

3. Preheat the oven to 200°F. Line a baking sheet with a wire cooling rack and place near the stove.

4. Heat the olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium- high heat until the oil is shimmering. Working in batches without crowding, add the eggplant (it should bubble up immediately) and fry, turning halfway through the cooking, until golden brown, about 3 minutes. Using a slotted spatula, transfer the eggplant slices to the rack and keep warm in the oven. If needed, add more oil to the skillet and reheat until shimmering before adding more eggplant.

5. For each serving, place 2 or 3 eggplant rounds on a dinner plate. Using a slotted spoon, top each with a generous amount of the tomato mixture. Serve immediately.


Eggplant Rollatini

MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS

These are a specialty of my mom Rose. She learned them from my grandparents, who served them on the original menu as eggplant involtini, the Italian word for "roulades" (stuffed and rolled food). Rollatini is an entirely American word. Call them what you wish, they are wonderful, especially when made with love by my mom for one of our family get-togethers.

1 small globe eggplant (about 1 pound), trimmed, peeled, halved lengthwise
and cut into 1/3-inch half-moons
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
4 large eggs
¾ cup olive oil, as needed
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 cups shredded fresh mozzarella cheese (about 8 ounces)
1 cup ricotta cheese
2/3 cup plus 3 tablespoons freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
(about 3 ounces)
3 cups Tomato Sauce


1. Cut the eggplant in half lengthwise. Cut each half into 1/3-inch-thick slices.

2. Spread the flour on a wide plate. Beat 3 of the eggs in a shallow bowl. Place the plate and bowl near the stove.

3. Line a large baking sheet with paper towels and place near the stove. Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until the oil is shimmering. Working in batches, dip the eggplant into the flour, coat with the egg, and add to the oil. Cook, turning occasionally, until the eggplant is lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spatula, transfer the eggplant to the paper towels. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

4. Beat the remaining egg in a medium bowl. Add the mozzarella, ricotta, and ? cup of the Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese and mix to combine.

5. Preheat the oven to 375 ° Lightly oil a 10 by 15-inch baking dish.

6. For each involtini, place a heaping tablespoon of the cheese mixture on the short end of an eggplant slice, roll it up, and place smooth side up in the dish. Pour the tomato sauce on top and sprinkle with the remaining 3 tablespoons Parmigiano cheese.

7. Bake until the sauce is simmering and the cheese has melted, about 20 minutes.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Patsy's Italian Family Cookbook by Sal J. Scognamillo, Jeffrey Gurwin. Copyright © 2015 Sal J. Scognamillo. Excerpted by permission of St. Martin's Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

CHEF SAL SCOGNAMILLO grew up in Patsy's Italian Restaurant, where he learned every aspect of the business's operation from his father (Joe) and grandfather (Patsy). He was named Executive Chef in 1985, upon his father's "retirement" from the kitchen. Under Sal's supervision, the Patsy's name has earned national brand-name recognition via their successful line of pasta sauces and gourmet Italian delicacies.

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