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Paved with Good Intentions: A Demon's Road Map To Your Soul
     

Paved with Good Intentions: A Demon's Road Map To Your Soul

4.1 8
by C. S. Lewis, Patricia Klein (Editor), Patricia S. Klein (Editor)
 

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Temptation and Deception Made Easy

The demon Wormwood first became famous through his correspondence with his uncle Screwtape, published in The Screwtape Letters. We are now privileged to peruse his field notebook from that demonic training session, complete with scribbles, notes, and excerpts from his uncle's letters. Wormwood's instructions, mission

Overview

Temptation and Deception Made Easy

The demon Wormwood first became famous through his correspondence with his uncle Screwtape, published in The Screwtape Letters. We are now privileged to peruse his field notebook from that demonic training session, complete with scribbles, notes, and excerpts from his uncle's letters. Wormwood's instructions, mission statements, and maxims for special occasions create a "best of Screwtape" that offers witty and cutting strategies for how best to corrupt a brand new Christian and steal him from the "Enemy" -- God.

If the best defense is to know your opponent's game book, this is a must read for all those who want to retain their souls.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060761547
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/22/2005
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
4.00(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.55(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

Read an Excerpt

Paved with Good Intentions

Chapter One

Re: The Church as a Tool

Use the Church itself as a weapon
against the Human's Christian faith

One of our great allies at present is the Church itself. Do not misunderstand me. I do not mean the Church as we see her spread out through all time and space and rooted in eternity, terrible as an army with banners. That, I confess, is a spectacle which makes our boldest tempters uneasy. But fortunately it is quite invisible to these humans. All your patient sees is the halffinished, sham Gothic erection on the new building estate. When he goes inside, he sees the local grocer with rather an oily expression on his face bustling up to offer him one shiny little book containing a liturgy which neither of them understands, and one shabby little book containing corrupt texts of a number of religious lyrics, mostly bad, and in very small print. When he gets to his pew and looks round him he sees just that selection of his neighbours whom he has hitherto avoided. You want to lean pretty heavily on those neighbours. Make his mind flit to and fro between an expression like 'the body of Christ' and the actual faces in the next pew. It matters very little, of course, what kind of people that next pew really contains. You may know one of them to be a great warrior on the Enemy's side. No matter. Your patient, thanks to Our Father Below, is a fool. Provided that any of those neighbours sing out of tune, or have boots that squeak, or double chins, or odd clothes, the patient will quite easily believe that their religion must therefore be somehow ridiculous. At his present stage, you see, he has an idea of'Christians' in his mind which he supposes to be spiritual but which, in fact, is largely pictorial. His mind is full of togas and sandals and armour and bare legs and the mere fact that the other people in church wear modern clothes is a real-though of course an unconscious difficulty to him. Never let it come to the surface; never let him ask what he expected them to look like. Keep everything hazy in his mind no and you will have all eternity wherein to amuse yourself by producing in him the peculiar kind of clarity which Hell affords.

The Strategy of Disappointment

Work hard, then, on the disappointment or anticlimax which is certainly coming to the patient during his first few weeks as a churchman. The Enemy allows this disappointment to occur on the threshold of every human endeavour. It occurs when the boy who has been enchanted in the nursery by Stories from the Odyssey buckles down to really learning Greek. It occurs when lovers have got married and begin the real task of learning to live together. In every department of life it marks the transition from dreaming aspiration to laborious doing. The Enemy takes this risk because He has a curious fantasy of making all these disgusting little human vermin into what He calls His 'free' lovers and servants — 'sons' is the word He uses, with His inveterate love of degrading the whole spiritual world by unnatural liaisons with the two-legged animals. Desiring their freedom, He therefore refuses to carry them, by their mere affections and habits, to any of the goals which He sets before them: He leaves them to 'do it on their own'. And there lies our opportunity. But also, remember, there lies our danger. If once they get through this initial dryness successfully, they become much less dependent on emotion and therefore much harder to tempt.

Paved with Good Intentions. Copyright (c) by C. Lewis . Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Meet the Author

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Out of the Silent Planet, The Great Divorce, The Screwtape Letters, and the universally acknowledged classics The Chronicles of Narnia. To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and have been transformed into three major motion pictures.

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) fue uno de los intelectuales más importantes del siglo veinte y podría decirse que fue el escritor cristiano más influyente de su tiempo. Fue profesor particular de literatura inglesa y miembro de la junta de gobierno en la Universidad Oxford hasta 1954, cuando fue nombrado profesor de literatura medieval y renacentista en la Universidad Cambridge, cargo que desempeñó hasta que se jubiló. Sus contribuciones a la crítica literaria, literatura infantil, literatura fantástica y teología popular le trajeron fama y aclamación a nivel internacional. C. S. Lewis escribió más de treinta libros, lo cual le permitió alcanzar una enorme audiencia, y sus obras aún atraen a miles de nuevos lectores cada año. Sus más distinguidas y populares obras incluyen Las Crónicas de Narnia, Los Cuatro Amores, Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino y Mero Cristianismo.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
November 29, 1898
Date of Death:
November 22, 1963
Place of Birth:
Belfast, Nothern Ireland
Place of Death:
Headington, England
Education:
Oxford University 1917-1923; Elected fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford in 1925
Website:
http://www.cslewisclassics.com

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Paved with Good Intentions: A Demon's Road Map To Your Soul 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This a 58 pages of excerpts from The Screwtape Letters. The Screwtape Letters was a great book, but only 160 pages as published. If you want to buy half a book at half price, but this book. Otherwise, buy Screwtape Letters in it's entirety. It's worth the cost and this book is not.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No Narnia rpers can go past this point.