Pemberley

Pemberley

by Emma Tennant

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781448211432
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
Publication date: 02/25/2012
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 1
Sales rank: 327,051
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Emma Tennant was born in London and educated at St Paul's Girls' School. She spent the World War II years and her childhood summers at the family's faux Gothic mansion The Glen in Peeblesshire. Her family also owned estates in Trinidad.

Tennant grew up in the modish London of the 1950s and 1960s. She worked as a travel writer for Queen magazine and an editor for Vogue, publishing her first novel, The Colour of Rain, under a pseudonym when she was twenty-six. Between 1975 and 1979, she edited a literary magazine, Bananas, which helped launch the careers of several young novelists.

A large number of books by Tennant have followed: thrillers, children's books, fantasies, and several revisionist takes on classic novels, including a sequel to Pride and Prejudice called Pemberley. In later years, she began to write about her own life in such books as Burnt Diaries (1999), which details her affair with Ted Hughes.

Tennant has been married four times, including to the journalist and author Christopher Booker and the political writer Alexander Cockburn. She has two daughters and a son, author Matthew Yorke. In April 2008, she married her partner of 33 years, Tim Owens.
Born in London, she was educated at St Paul's Girls' School and spent the World War II years and her childhood summers at the family's faux Gothic mansion The Glen in Peeblesshire. Her family also owned estates in Trinidad.

Tennant grew up in the modish London of the 1950s and 1960s. She worked as a travel writer for Queen magazine and an editor for Vogue, publishing her first novel, The Colour of Rain, under a pseudonym when she was twenty-six. Between 1975 and 1979, she edited a literary magazine, Bananas, which helped launch the careers of several young novelists.

A large number of books by Tennant have followed: thrillers, children's books, fantasies, and several revisionist takes on classic novels, including a sequel to Pride and Prejudice called Pemberley. In later years, she began to treat her own life in such books as Burnt Diaries (1999), which details her affair with Ted Hughes.

Tennant has been married four times, including to the journalist and author Christopher Booker and the political writer Alexander Cockburn. She has two daughters and a son, author Matthew Yorke. In April 2008, she married her partner of 33 years, Tim Owens.

Read an Excerpt



Pemberley



Or Pride and Prejudice Continued



By Tennant, Emma


St. Martin's Griffin



Copyright © 2006

Tennant, Emma

All right reserved.


ISBN: 0312361793




Chapter One 

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a married man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a son and heir.
 
So at least are the sentiments of all those related on both sides of the family; and there are others, besides, who might do better to keep their tongues from wagging on the fecundity or otherwise of a match.
 
"My dear Mrs Bennet," said Mrs Long one day to her friend, who was newly removed from Longbourn since the death of her husband, "do not you have a happy event to look forward to? I expect daily to hear news of your daughter Elizabeth and the charming Mr Darcy. I am most surprised to have heard nothing yet."
 
Mrs Bennet replied that she was not accustomed to hear from her daughter every day of the week.
 
"The news of an impending arrival in the family need only be communicated once," said Mrs Long. "Unless," she added after some reflection, "a girl is born first, and then there will need to be further communications, to be sure."
 
"My dear Mrs Long," said Mrs Bennet, who was accustomed to these taunts but was still unable to bear them, "I have enough to do, settling into this small house with only Mary to keep me company; and she is always in the library, as poor Mr Bennet was, when we were atLongbourn. I have no time for such speculations."
 
"You show all the courage in the world," replied Mrs Long; "and this is well known at Meryton. To have your home taken from you when you have many years to live yet . . ."
 
"And two daughters still unmarried," said Mrs Bennet, glad to find herself in a conversation more agreeable to her. "For even if Kitty does stay with my dear Jane at Barlow, and with Lizzy at Pemberley, the girl is unmarried and may return here any day now, to eat me out of house and home."
 
Mrs Long remarked that the entail of Longbourn to a distant male cousin, Mr Collins, had been a great misfortune to the Bennet family; and she remarked again that Mrs Bennet's fortitude and bravery in removing from her home was noted by the whole neighbourhood.
 
"I am very well provided for here," said Mrs Bennet, who did not care for the excessive sympathy of the neighbourhood. "Mr Darcy has been most generous, as you know, and has enabled me to buy this house. Mr Bennet, I am sorry to say, made no provision for his wife and daughters."
 
"To have Mr Darcy as a son-in-law must be wonderful indeed," said Mrs Long. "You must feel truly indebted to him, for none of us can see that you would have had a roof over your head if your Elizabeth had not married a man with a generous nature and ten thousand a year."
 
"On the contrary," cried Mrs Bennet, who again disliked the way in which Mrs Long turned the conversation, "it is Mr Darcy who must be indebted to me."
 
Copyright 1993 by Emma Tennant. All rights reserved.


Continues...




Excerpted from Pemberley
by Tennant, Emma
Copyright © 2006 by Tennant, Emma.
Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.


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Pemberley 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Tennant must have been in a hurry and in need of money when she delivered this story. Shame for only pretendingto write, and for raping Austin's characters. Shame on me for throwing good money at an oportunist. Not worth the read.
Anonymous 12 months ago
Interesting style and word selections that mimic but do not reach the satiric genius of Jane Austen.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Emma Tennant sounds very like Jane Austen.I really enjoyed her novel.