Pemberley Manor: Darcy and Elizabeth, for better or for worse

Pemberley Manor: Darcy and Elizabeth, for better or for worse

by Kathryn Nelson
3.8 29

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Pemberley Manor 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Laurel_Ann More than 1 year ago
In Pemberley Manor author Kathryn Nelson offers a new twist on the continuation of Pride and Prejudice. The blissful life that Jane Austen alluded to at the conclusion of her novel with the marriage of her characters is quickly shattered on the first day of the honeymoon. Fitzwilliam Darcy, the proud and arrogant man that Elizabeth Bennet married has a troubled past, confirming for me much of his actions in the original novel and why I have never thought that their happily-ever-after could just instantly happen because they declared their love and took vows. Hold on to your bonnets! If you thought that the Bennet family was dysfunctional, just wait until you meet the Darcy's. We now know what Lady Catherine de Bourgh meant when she bragged about the true Darcy spirit. There is an oppressive presence haunting Pemberley Manor. Mr. Darcy's deceased mother Lady Anne is not the elegant, proper and gracious woman that one would suspect as the Mistress of Pemberley. It is her influence more than his gentle father that has shaped Darcy's adult personality. As Darcy gradually reveals his troubled past to his new bride Elizabeth, she is not only challenged with the demands of becoming the new Mistress of a grand estate, but in helping him discover the missing pieces to his parent's story that will free him from the past and allow him to find peace and happiness in their new life together. Even though this deep psychological subtext may sound omnipresent, there are other intriguing elements to his novel that lighten it up. The evolving relationship of Darcy and Elizabeth as newlyweds is fascinating to watch. If there were ever two souls of opposite temperaments destined to be better as a team, it was Lizzy and Darcy. Their conversations run hot and cold to downright hilarious. We also see familiar characters such as Caroline Bingley evolve beyond her bitterness and spite, shy Georgina Darcy bloom and catch the heart of a new beau, Jane as angelic as ever, her husband Charles Bingley finally have a revelation, and new characters introduced that blend in and add interesting depth. Nelson's skill with language is respectfully reminiscent of Austen, but not mimicy. The story is compelling, with a haunting mystery suggestive of du Maurier's Rebecca. However, Pemberley Manor does have its faults. After she starts off well presenting one of the villains as Caroline Bingley, she delivers an unsatisfying thud to the resolution of her character. Though I understood exactly there she was going in showing us the dark side of Darcy, he was a bit too tearful at times for my ideal romantic hero taste. As the novel moved along, I found it becoming more modern in style and progressive in thinking. When more than a ghost comes out of the closet, I was a bit taken aback by the characters 21st-century response to it. Because Nelson was taken a risk and presented a side of Darcy and Lizzy that we have not yet explored to this depth, there will be those ready to throw a few disapproving bricks through Pemberley Manor's elegantly glazed windows. Regardless, I found her tale charming, intelligent and engaging; uniquely one of the most thought provoking and satisfying Austen sequels that I have ever read. Laurel Ann, Austenprose
LoveofDarcy More than 1 year ago
I am a huge fan of all "Austen" books. I have read or devoured many, many sequels and "what if" stories on Pride and Prejudice. This particular novel didn't do a whole lot for me. I didn't appreciate my "hero" to be made out as a "cry baby". This disturbed me greatly. Darcy was sensitive but not pouting like a small child and crying constantly. At least not the Darcy I have adored and read about and I'm sure not the Darcy Austen created and depicted. I forced myself to finish this book. I enjoyed the writing however it did not keep "Austen-isk". She held me for most of the book. Let's try another Ms. Nelson!
kj10 More than 1 year ago
Calling all Jane Austen fans! Read all about the first year of married life for the beloved characters Fitzwilliam Darcy and Elizabeth Bennett. Just when you thought their story ended and they lived happily ever after, a novel comes along to show you that relationships take work. Fitzwilliam and Elizabeth Darcy are no exception. If you liked Pride and Prejudice, you'll enjoy Pemberley Manor by Kathryn L. Nelson as much as I did. The story begins on the wedding day of Mr. Darcy and Lizzy Bennett. Trouble ensues when some rather "high and mighty" guests make casual, but insensitive comments about the happy couple. Unexpected turns and misunderstandings plague the wedding night, and a year of ups and downs visits the newlyweds. The novel's rich dialogue and masterful descriptions make Pemberley Manor a delightful read. Unexpected transformations will cause the reader to smile with joy. Readers will also be happy to run into old friends - Charles and Jane Bingley and Georgiana Darcy - and meet new ones - the Alexander family and Mr. Trevor Handley. However, ghosts of the past, as well as the meddling ways of the Hursts and Miss Caroline Bingley, will haunt the Pemberley household. A grave mistake of pride will also threaten to destroy the Darcy's young love. After reading various novels where writers tried to give us a glimpse of what Mr. and Mrs. Darcy's life might be like after Pride and Prejudice, I discovered none have been so wonderfully told as Kathryn L. Nelson's Pemberley Manor.
izadora More than 1 year ago
I've read quite a few of the Pride & Prejudice follow up books & this was one of the best because the characters didn't stray too far outside Austen's comfort zone. I would like to see another sequel to this offering with a bit less crying by Mr. Darcey & laughing by Elizabeth. They were in some state of hysterics most of the book. Not sure why all the crying by Darcey was necessary. The Elizabeth character also took on way too much of the blame for everything but overlooking these flaws - the read was still enjoyable. I like the characters - especially Edward & Trevor - who was about 200 years ahead of social change. (more 2013 than 1813)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This novel was not a bad read, somewhat predictable but entertaining, especially if you've wished to witness Caroline Bingley's comeuppance. I read the entire book in one dreary weekend and thoroughly enjoyed myself.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
i enjoyed the story
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Lekster More than 1 year ago
As a voracious reader with a special love for all things Austen, it is always with a guarded enthusiasm that I pick up any of the many sequels and variations available. Pemberley Manor was easily one of my favorites. I read it in a single night and was very sorry to have finished it. I sincerely hope Ms. Nelson will reward us with a continuation of her lovely story. And soon, please!
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Lauren_Voorhies More than 1 year ago
I am a huge fan of Jane Austen and Pride and Predjudice. I thought that this book was incredibly well written. This book has everything; drama, romance, action, and of course, those "aww!" moments. I believe that Katheryn Nelson did a fantastic job of bringing Elizabeth, Mr. Dacy, and the rest of the characters to life, and that Jane Austen would be very pround of this rendition of her classic tale.
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Uzuri More than 1 year ago
It's as if Jane Austin picked up her quill and continued the tale of the Darcys herself. A very good read for old and young. Regarding the cover, it would be nice to see Fitzwilliam's eyes.
ABAR More than 1 year ago
This book is written somewhat in the style of Jane Austen and prvides a seamless follow-up to the book. My only real criticism is that the agony is piled on somewhat heavily, but otherwise I enjoyed it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
breedlover More than 1 year ago
I have read many variations and continuations of the P&P story. Some I've liked, some I've loved and some have been pretty awful. This one started out so great that I thought I was actually reading a work by Jane Austen. Then Darcy becomes unstable, moody and one of the biggest cry babies I have had the displeasure to read. In fact, most of the men were very sensitive and weak. Tears came to them too often for my liking. I'm sorry I wasted my time on what had the potential to be a great book....not P&P (Darcy as Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde).