A Penknife in My Heart

A Penknife in My Heart

by Nicholas Blake

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Overview

A Penknife in My Heart by Nicholas Blake

First published in 1958, A Penknife in My Heart tells the story of how two men - total strangers - establish the perfect alibis by arranging to switch victims. Ned Stowe will kill Stuart Hammer's wealthy uncle for which service Hammer is to eliminate Stowe's neurotic wife, Helena. The men plot and the plan - with its horrifyingly simple premise - is solidified...

'More convincing, more detailedly thought-through than Highsmith's [Strangers on a Train].' - The New York Times

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781448209668
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
Publication date: 07/16/2012
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 230
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Nicholas Blake is the pseudonym for C. Day Lewis CBE, who was Poet Laureate from 1968 until his death in 1972, aged sixty-eight.

C. Day Lewis had an illustrious career both as an academic and as a literary figure, producing many collections of poetry, critical works, translations and novels under his own name.
However for his twenty detective novels, and his crime short stories, he adopted the pen name of Blake. His central character in most of the novels was the cultivated amateur sleuth Nigel Strangeways.

C. Day Lewis married his second wife, the actress Jill Balcon, in 1951. He had four children, one of whom is the actor Daniel Day Lewis.
Nicholas Blake is the pseudonym of poet and author, Cecil Day-Lewis, used primarily for his mystery series.

Cecil Day-Lewis CBE (1904 - 22) was a British poet from Ireland and the Poet Laureate from 1968 until his death in 1972. He is the father of actor Daniel Day-Lewis and documentary filmmaker and television chef Tamasin Day-Lewis.

Day-Lewis was born in Ballintubbert, County Laois, Ireland. He was the son of the Reverend Frank Cecil Day-Lewis and Kathleen Squires. After Day-Lewis's mother died in 1906, he was brought up in London by his father, with the help of an aunt, spending summer holidays with relatives in Wexford. Day-Lewis continued to regard himself as Anglo-Irish for the remainder of his life, though after the declaration of the Republic of Ireland in 1948 he chose British rather than Irish citizenship, on the grounds that 1940 had taught him where his deepest roots lay. He was educated at Sherborne School and at Wadham College, Oxford, from which he graduated in 1927.

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