ISBN-10:
0935652876
ISBN-13:
9780935652871
Pub. Date:
07/01/2009
Publisher:
Center for Applications of Psychological Type, Incorporated
People Types and Tiger Stripes: Using Psychological Type to Help Students Discover Their Unique Potential / Edition 4

People Types and Tiger Stripes: Using Psychological Type to Help Students Discover Their Unique Potential / Edition 4

by Gordon Lawrence
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Overview

People's behavior often seems randomly varied-but according to Carl G. Jung, behavior actually follows patterns. Jung called these patterns "psychological types," and he wrote extensively about these types. Isabel Briggs Myers brought Jung's concepts into the mainstream through development of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® instrument which helps a person figure out his or her psychological type.

People Types and Tiger Stripes provides a detailed explanation-including two essays by Isabel Myers-of how type works in everyday life and how type applications can be used in the field of teaching. The book has a number of exercises, generous charts and tables, and two quizzes to test your knowledge.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780935652871
Publisher: Center for Applications of Psychological Type, Incorporated
Publication date: 07/01/2009
Edition description: CENTER FOR APPS OF PSYCH TYPE, INC(
Pages: 286
Product dimensions: 7.20(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

Author's Pre face ................................................................. ix
Prologue ................................................................................. x
PART ONE: BASIC APPLICATIONS
CHAPTER 1 People Types & Tiger Stripes .................................................... 1
Patterns of Mental Habits .............................................................................. 2
Exercise: Identifying Mental Habits ........................................................... 3
People Types Come from the Four Sets of Choices........................................... 7
The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® Instrument ................................................. 8
Jung's Theory of Psychological Types ........................................................... 10
Questions Often Asked About Type ............................................................... 16
Talk About Type Concepts ........................................................................... 20
Exercise: Eat an Apple ........................................................................... 20
Check Your Knowledge of Type Concepts ...................................................... 22
Test Your Knowledge: Type Concepts, Part One............................................. 23
CHAPTER 2 Type, Motivation & Learning Style .........................................31
The Process of Studying Type Theory ........................................................... 31
Type as a Way of Classifying Behavior ........................................................... 33
Type and Motivation................................................................................... 36
Type and Learning Style .............................................................................. 37
CHAPTER 3 Using Type Concepts in Planning Instruction........................47
Distribution of the Sixteen Types in Classrooms.............................................. 47
School Instruction Fits Some Types Better Than Others................................... 48
Planning Instruction to Honor the Rights of Every Type.................................. 54
Exercise: Four Work Settings.................................................................. 55
Tips for Using Type in Planning..................................................................... 59
Plan a Unit of Instruction Using Type Concepts............................................... 66
Examples of Class Projects Successful with All Types of Students..................... 68
Using Type in Classroom-Bound Instruction................................................... 71
CHAPTER 4 Type & Teaching Styles............................................................73
What Research Reveals About Type and Teaching Preferences......................... 73
Teachers' Choices of Levels and Subjects........................................................ 76
The Teacher in the Classroom....................................................................... 79
Exercise: Examining and Adjusting Teaching Styles.................................... 85
Type and the Teaching Team......................................................................... 87
Exercise: The Green-White Conflict......................................................... 88
Type and Human Relations (by Isabel Briggs Myers)....................................... 90
CHAPTER 5 Type Is a Four-Letter Word:
Uses & Abuses of the MBTI® Instrument.......................................................93
Misuse Arising from the Indicator's Appearance.............................................. 94
Misuse Arising from Confusion About Scales and Scores.................................. 96
Wrong Uses of the MBTI® Instrument........................................................... 99
Reliability, Validity, and Practical Effectiveness.............................................. 101
Appropriate Uses....................................................................................... 101
Practitioner's Skill...................................................................................... 102
Practitioner's Expectations.......................................................................... 103
The Ethics of Using the MBTI® Instrument................................................... 103
CHAPTER 6 Type & Stereotype: Why Do We Stereotype?................. 105
Type and Stereotype.................................................................................. 106
Persona, Shadow, and Stereotype............................................................... 110
An Activity for Identifying Stereotypes......................................................... 110
What We Can Do....................................................................................... 113
CHAPTER 7 Psychological Type & Education........................................... 115
Taking Type into Account in Education (by Isabel Briggs Myers)..................... 115
PART TWO: ADVANCED APPLICATIONS
CHAPTER 8 The Dynamics of Type: More Than Four Preferences ......... 125
Type Theory Is About Perception and Judgment .......................................... 128
Dynamic Relationships of the Mental Processes ........................................... 130
The Attitudes: Extraversion and Introversion .............................................. 135
Judging and Perceiving Reveal the Dynamics ............................................... 140
The Third and Fourth Mental Processes ...................................................... 143
The Practical Benefi ts of Knowing Type Dynamics ....................................... 148
Test Your Knowledge: Type Concepts, Part Two .......................................... 149
CHAPTER 9 Introducing Type into Curriculum Reform ........................ 157
The Extraversion and Introversion Preferences............................................ 158
The Sensing and Intuition Preferences ........................................................ 160
The Thinking and Feeling Preferences ........................................................ 161
The Judging and Perceiving Preferences ..................................................... 162
Using the Type Preferences in Developing Curriculum .................................. 164
Curriculum Assumptions That Need to Be Changed ...................................... 165
Achievement Versus Development .............................................................. 166
Type Development .................................................................................... 169
Taking Type Development into Account in Curriculum Work ......................... 170
Infl uencing the System .............................................................................. 171
Kinds of Mind ........................................................................................... 174
Engaging All the Types Through Their Strengths ......................................... 175
CHAPTER 10 Developmental Needs & Type Concepts ............................ 179
Observing and Analyzing Development Problems ......................................... 180
The Zigzag Analysis .................................................................................. 183
Type Development Analysis ........................................................................ 187
Case Studies in Type Development Analysis ................................................. 190
Exercise: Analyzing Student Diffi culties ................................................. 196
How Type Development Concepts Contribute to
Teaching Character Development .......................................................... 198
Exercise: Type Strengths and Trouble Spots .......................................... 199
Exercise: Observation as a Way to Identify Type Characteristics ...............201
CHAPTER 11 Are the Sixteen Types Sixteen Kinds of Mind?................... 211
Types, Not Traits....................................................................................... 212
Mind as Verb............................................................................................. 212
The Types as Kinds of Mind........................................................................ 214
Four Kinds of Mind.................................................................................... 216
ST, SF, NF, NT Mental Priorities................................................................... 219
ST, SF, NF, NT Interactions.......................................................................... 220
Discovering the Biases of One's Mind-set...................................................... 221
Mind-sets in Organizational Problem Solving..................................... 222
Exercise: Highlighting Mind-set Differences in an Organization................. 223
Thoughts in Summary....................................................... 231
CHAPTER 12 Introducing Type Effectively into an Organization:
What's the Problem..................................................................................... 233
What's Needed to Influence the Organizational Culture?................................ 233
Gather Information.................................................................................... 234
Deciding on Possible Entry Points............................................................... 242
Deciding on Strategy: The Long View.......................................................... 246
Deciding on Tactics: An Action Plan............................................................. 246
Ethical Guidelines for Using the MBTI® Instrument....................................... 248
Epilogue: Next Steps..............................................................................251
Appendix A: Descriptions of the Sixteen Types....................................... 253
Appendix B: The Four Columns: Combinations of
Perception and Judgment................................................................. 260
References............................................................................................... 261
Index....................................................................................................... 263

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