Perception and Imaging: Photography--A Way of Seeing / Edition 4

Perception and Imaging: Photography--A Way of Seeing / Edition 4

by Richard D. Zakia
5.0 1
ISBN-10:
0240824539
ISBN-13:
9780240824536
Pub. Date:
03/22/2013
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis

Paperback

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Perception and Imaging: Photography -- A Way of Seeing 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you’ve ever looked at your picture, then compared it to someone else’s and found yours a little lacking, this may be the book for you. Dr. Zakia’s book explains the science behind the visual. There are examples to help make your visuals more appealing or use the science to manipulate the viewer. The book is not strictly a photography book. It is primarily a book about how the brain perceives lines, shadows, colors, placements, repetitions, groupings, contours, negative space, etc. to enhance a visual element or, at times, show something that doesn’t exist at all, or show how we don’t see all there is to see. As a novice visual arts experimenter, I found the book to be extremely interesting although some topics are beyond my scope (at this point); however, I think that I will “grow” into the chapters I don’t currently understand. I have learned many things that I am currently using in my photography. The book starts with basic design and continues with illustrating a broad scope of perceptual concepts, clearly explaining each. After viewing a picture and reading the explanation, I would often find that I didn’t see everything, or saw the wrong thing, or be “tricked” into see something that wasn’t there. For example, page 176 shows a woman’s split face. Upon reading the verbiage, you find that the face isn’t split at all. On page 167, a change in the angle of the photo changes the perceived placement of items. Not only is this a good book for people creating visuals, it provides a good understanding to those that appreciate photography, paintings, and advertising. Don’t always believe what you see.