Perception and Imaging: Photography--A Way of Seeing

Perception and Imaging: Photography--A Way of Seeing

by Richard D. Zakia
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Overview

Perception and Imaging: Photography--A Way of Seeing by Richard D. Zakia

How do you experience a photograph? What do you want a viewer to feel when they look at your image?

Perception and Imaging explains how we see and what we don't see. Relevant psychological principles will help you predict your viewer's emotional reaction to your photographic images, giving you more power, control, and tools for communicating your desired message. Knowing how our minds work helps photographers, graphic designers, videographers, animators, and visual communicators both create and critique sophisticated works of visual art. Benefit from this insight in your work.

Topics covered in this book: gestalt grouping, memory and association, space, time, color, contours, illusion and ambiguity, morphics, personality, subliminals, critiquing photographs, and rhetoric.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781136092374
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Publication date: 02/11/2013
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 424
File size: 15 MB
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About the Author

Richard Zakia is a 1956 graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). Some of his classmates at the time were Carl Chiarenza, Peter Bunnell, Bruce Davidson, Ken Josephson, Pete Turner and Jerry Uelsmann. Minor White was a member of the faculty and Beaumont Newhall was Adjunct. It was a great and enriching mix. After graduation he was employed as a photographic engineer in the Color Technology Division of Eastman Kodak. During the Sputnik era he decided teaching was his vocation and accepted a position with RIT where he served for 34 years. For a time he was Director of Instructional Research and Development and Chair of the Fine Art Photography Department and graduate program in Imaging Arts. He is a recipient of the Eisenhart Outstanding Teaching Award. Zakia has authored and co-authored thirteen books on photography and perception. He is also the co-editor with Dr. Leslie Stroebel of the third edition (1993) of The Focal Encyclopedia of Photography and a contributor to the fourth edition (2007). His most recent book is Teaching Photography with Dr. Glen Rand.

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Perception and Imaging: Photography -- A Way of Seeing 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you’ve ever looked at your picture, then compared it to someone else’s and found yours a little lacking, this may be the book for you. Dr. Zakia’s book explains the science behind the visual. There are examples to help make your visuals more appealing or use the science to manipulate the viewer. The book is not strictly a photography book. It is primarily a book about how the brain perceives lines, shadows, colors, placements, repetitions, groupings, contours, negative space, etc. to enhance a visual element or, at times, show something that doesn’t exist at all, or show how we don’t see all there is to see. As a novice visual arts experimenter, I found the book to be extremely interesting although some topics are beyond my scope (at this point); however, I think that I will “grow” into the chapters I don’t currently understand. I have learned many things that I am currently using in my photography. The book starts with basic design and continues with illustrating a broad scope of perceptual concepts, clearly explaining each. After viewing a picture and reading the explanation, I would often find that I didn’t see everything, or saw the wrong thing, or be “tricked” into see something that wasn’t there. For example, page 176 shows a woman’s split face. Upon reading the verbiage, you find that the face isn’t split at all. On page 167, a change in the angle of the photo changes the perceived placement of items. Not only is this a good book for people creating visuals, it provides a good understanding to those that appreciate photography, paintings, and advertising. Don’t always believe what you see.