×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Period Pieces: Stories for Girls
     

Period Pieces: Stories for Girls

by Erzsi Deak, Kristin Embry Litchman
 

See All Formats & Editions

Girlfriend.
Aunt Flo.
Doña Rosa.
That time of the month.
Being on the rag.
The curse.
Monthlies.
Womanly time.
George.

You might have a different name for it, but all of these words mean the same thing: your period. And the number of nicknames you can make up for your period is nothing compared to the

Overview

Girlfriend.
Aunt Flo.
Doña Rosa.
That time of the month.
Being on the rag.
The curse.
Monthlies.
Womanly time.
George.

You might have a different name for it, but all of these words mean the same thing: your period. And the number of nicknames you can make up for your period is nothing compared to the number of ways you can feel about it.

You may wonder if you're the only girl you know who doesn't have her period. Or you may feel excited about growing up. Are you confused about what's happening inside your body? Or do you feel silly as you giggle with your mom or friends about the pamphlets you're given in school?

In these frank and often poignant new short stories, twelve stellar authors explore the anxiety and excitement of "becoming a woman." Engaging, empowering, and sometimes hilarious, these stories show us girls who couldn't be more different — and yet ultimately reveal that, in many ways, we are all the same.

Author Biography:

Erzsi Deak has been a journalist for more than twenty years and has covered fashion and children's features from Alaska to San Francisco to Paris. She is on the board of directors of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators. Her story "Envelope Thief" is featured in the book They Only Laughed Later: Tales of Women on the Move. She lives in Paris, France, with her husband and three daughters.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
A baker's dozen short stories, Period Pieces: Stories for Girls, ed. by Erzsi Deak and Kristin Embry Litchman, focuses on-you guessed it-the facts, the fears and, sometimes, the sheer embarrassment of menstruation. Contributors include Newbery Medalist Linda Sue Park ("White Pants"); Dian Curtis Regan ("Living on Chocolate"); and Rita Williams-Garcia ("Making Do").
Children's Literature
This anthology of stories by some big name writers, including Newbery award winner Linda Sue Park, features young girls discovering what menstruation is all about, getting their first period in situations horrifying or funny or celebratory, and discovering the truths behind the myths and stories. April Halprin Wayland's short poem says it all for some girls. Some will be intrigued by Uma Krishnaswami's three-generational talisman of friendship and separation. Others will laugh at the total embarrassment of Linda Sue Park's girl in the white pants or feel a touch of relief at Cynthia Leitich Smith's Gentleman Cowboy whose many sisters taught him how to treat a girl. A recurring theme in the stories is that many adults don't know how to address the questions of puberty. For parents who feel awkward talking about that moment when a girl becomes a woman, these stories might provide a starting point. The stories vary in quality, but each has a kernel of truth to which some girl, somewhere, will respond. 2003, HarperCollins Children's Books,
— Elisabeth Greenberg
VOYA
Twelve short stories by various authors deal with girls' experiences of getting their first periods. Linda Sue Park tells about the last pair of white pants she ever owned; Jane Kurtz's story explores a girl, whose mother has died, getting ready to prepare her father to take her shopping for "supplies"; Dian Curtis Reagan tells about a partially deaf foster child finally feeling included in a family when it happens to her. Uma Krishnaswami's lovely tale in three episodes features a bangle passed from generation to generation, from India at the time of the partition to Baltimore in 1999. As with any anthology, some stories are weaker (including contributions by the editors), but on the whole, this accessible, browsable collection carries a tone that is both funny and sincere. Many different kinds of experiences are portrayed here, and although there is little about the mechanics of dealing with menstruation, this collection will provide an enjoyable supplement to nonfiction titles as it more readily addresses emotional and social issues. Most girls in these stories are aged eleven through thirteen. Sadly, although one story does deal with a girl getting her period at a very young age (under ten years old and ahead of her older sister), there is no story involving a girl out of middle school, which will leave late bloomers drooping. Still, most libraries will find this collection useful. Whether or not young readers will choose it on their own, it will be an attractive offering to those asking for books on the subject. PLB
— Nina Lindsay <%ISBN%>0066237963
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-Aptly titled, these 13 stories describe girls' first experiences with either getting their periods or learning about them. Though there are myriad books about menstruation, few, if any, fiction collections mark this rite of passage. Among the contributors are Johanna Hurwitz, Rita Williams-Garcia, and Jane Kurtz. Though the selections share a common theme, they reflect a multitude of settings, cultures, families, and circumstances. In "I Don't Wanna Hear It," Litchman describes one girl's initial disgust and denial upon learning about menstruation. In Linda Sue Park's "White Pants," a seventh grader describes the humiliating tell-tale stain on her pants that announces her first menses to the entire student body. The next day she shares her surprise, relief, and, finally, disappointment at how quickly the incident is forgotten. Three generations of Indian girls become dooram (with period) in Uma Krishnaswami's "The Gift," which begins in a partitioned India in 1947 and ends 52 years later in Baltimore. By far the funniest piece is Bobbi Katz's "Betrayal," in which an evasive mother tells her curious daughter that her sanitary napkins are for "when you are unwell." The youngster later surprises an unsuspecting insurance agent when she answers the door with a pad around her neck, nursing a sore throat. An honest, touching, sometimes hilarious collection.-Barbara Auerbach, New York City Public Schools Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A collection of stories about the onset of menstruation by some very well-known female writers for young people. What surprises in this gathering is the overwhelming sense of embarrassment and ignorance about the arrival of monthly courses. Linda Sue Park writes with great wit about her first-and last-pair of white pants, and what happened to them. Cynthia Leitich Smith tells of the kindly cowboy, barely older than she, who rescues her from fear of heights on horseback and from being caught on said horse with no supplies or nearby bathroom. A wonderful and tender tale of Mercedes, who misses her dead mother and her promised celebration for "becoming a woman," ends with Mercedes finding in her father the support she needs. Uma Krishnaswami's story ties three generations of Indian women to the 1947 partition of India and Pakistan and a silver bangle that marks that first period. Perhaps most moving of all, Rita Williams-Garcia allows Lucy Ray to save Dorinda the Freedom Rider from menstrual distress in jail in the South in 1968, but not in the way Lucy Ray expects. There's no sex, and little discussion of the purpose of menstruation. Instead, these stories illuminate the feelings of that first time in a very straightforward way. Don't let the subtitle fool you-boys intrigued by the workings of the female mind and body will be intrigued, too. (Short stories. 9-13)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780066237961
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/01/2003
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.65(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews