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Peter Pan: Peter and Wendy and Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens
     

Peter Pan: Peter and Wendy and Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

3.9 7
by J. M. Barrie, Jack Zipes (Introduction)
 

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The character of Peter Pan first came to life in the stories J. M. Barrie told to five brothers -- three of whom were named Peter, John, and Michael. Peter Pan is considered one of the greatest children's stories of all time and continues to charm readers one hundred years after its first appearance as a play in 1904.

Overview

The character of Peter Pan first came to life in the stories J. M. Barrie told to five brothers -- three of whom were named Peter, John, and Michael. Peter Pan is considered one of the greatest children's stories of all time and continues to charm readers one hundred years after its first appearance as a play in 1904.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Barrie wrote his fantasy of childhood, added another figure to our enduring literature, and thereby undoubtedly made one of the boldest bids for immortality of any writer. . . . It is a masterpiece.”
–J. B. PRIESTLEY
Publishers Weekly
A number of classic children's books return in milestone and reissued editions for a new generation. J.M. Barrie's enchanting Peter Pan: 100th Anniversary Edition features a large trim for reading aloud and rich, detailed illustrations by Michael Hague (which he originally published in 1987). Peter Pan's flyaway red hair and tattered garment of "skeleton leaves and the juices that ooze out of trees" capture the free spirit of the boy who refused to grow up. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
The Darling children, while drifting off to sleep, have often spoken to their mother of Peter Pan but she never quite understands. That is, until the night that the mischievous imp and his companion fairy, Tinker Bell, return to the Darling house to find his lost shadow. It is here that the Darling children, Wendy, John and Michael, receive their first flying lesson, and the first of many other adventures as they are whisked away to Peter's fanciful island of Neverland. This version of Barrie's classic tale is accompanied by the playful illustrations of the highly talented Trina Schart Hyman. Her full-page acrylic paintings particularly depict waif-like characters captured in subtle earthy tones. Her illustrations are done with such careful detail that one cannot help stop reading to study the pictures. Even so, they do not detract from the story itself;they simply add another dimension to the dreamlike quality of Neverland itself. This wonderful version of Peter Pan surely belongs in any home dedicated to the reading of quality literature. 2001, Scribner/Simon & Schuster, $25.00. Ages 7 up. Reviewer:Trina Heidt
School Library Journal
Gr 3-7-- A pleasure to view, read, and hold, this new edition of an old favorite deserves space in every collection. From jacket painting, to cover (with Tinker Bell embossed in gold), to endpapers (dark maps of Neverland), Gustafson's artwork opens doors to glimpses of old friends and to new interpretations. Fifty oil paintings reveal expressive, changing characters. Peter Pan is dewy-cheeked, spry, wicked. Maternal Wendy is tender, then stoic. Even Hook is at times downcast. The Indians, proud and handsome, avoid stereotype. Masterly composition and use of light create dramatic full-page illustrations, accompanied by cameos of ordinary objects (kite, bear, tea kettle). Compared to Hague's illustrations for Peter Pan (Holt, 1987), which were dark and surreal, these are light and vital. Handsome bookmaking, Barrie's text, and Gustafson's pictures combine to breathe new life into Peter Pan's old shadow. --Carolyn Noah, Central Mass. Regional Library System, Worcester, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142437933
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/27/2004
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
128,335
Product dimensions:
5.02(w) x 7.69(h) x 0.46(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Sir James Matthew Barrie, 1st Baronet, OM (9 May 1860 - 19 June 1937) was a Scottish author and dramatist, best remembered today as the creator of Peter Pan. The child of a family of small-town weavers, he was educated in Scotland. He moved to London, where he developed a career as a novelist and playwright. There he met the Llewelyn Davies boys who inspired him in writing about a baby boy who has magical adventures in Kensington Gardens (included in The Little White Bird), then to write Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up, a "fairy play" about this ageless boy and an ordinary girl named Wendy who have adventures in the fantasy setting of Neverland. This play quickly overshadowed his previous work and although he continued to write successfully, it became his best-known work, credited with popularising the name Wendy, which was very uncommon previously. Barrie unofficially adopted the Davies boys following the deaths of their parents.

Barrie was made a baronet by George V in 1913, and a member of the Order of Merit in 1922. Before his death, he gave the rights to the Peter Pan works to London's Great Ormond Street Hospital, which continues to benefit from them.

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Peter Pan: Peter and Wendy and Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
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WillyTO1 More than 1 year ago
I am used to the Peter Pan movie, like most people. I never read the book as a child. Reading it as an adult, I'm not surprised to learn that the book is quite different than other forms of Peter Pan. Peter is a self-centered brat who only (mostly?) thinks of himself. And Tinker Bell has a mad-on throughout the book, calling Peter 'you silly ass' at several points. My political correctness would prevent me from reading this story to children or recommending that they read it. While the adventures are fun to read, the characters of Peter and Tink would be difficult to explain. I'm slowly making my way thru the classics and am glad I finally read the original story.