Phytosphere

Phytosphere

by Scott Mackay

NOOK Book(eBook)

$4.99
View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now
LEND ME® See Details

Overview

All life on Earth is held hostage by a desperate and ruthless alien race in this “hard-hitting apocalyptic thriller” from award-winning author Scott Mackay (Booklist).

The Tarsalans came to Earth hoping to settle on the planet alongside a sympathetic human race. But after years of delicate negotiations, their patience reaches the breaking point and they decide to make their case for immigration terrifyingly clear—by enveloping the planet in a green sphere which blocks out all sunlight.

Without energy from the sun, the Earth—and every living thing on it—is doomed.

Soon, civilization breaks down as the instinct for individual survival shreds humanity’s common bonds. It appears mankind may destroy itself even before the Phytosphere does.

The only hope against catastrophe lies in the troubled connection between two brothers—one stranded at a lunar base on the moon, the other trapped on the dying Earth…

“Deftly juggling hard sci-fi and a bleak tale of post-apocalyptic survival” Scott Mackay once again offers an electrifying sci-fi tale of “high-tech intrigue and old-fashioned suspense” (Publishers Weekly).

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781625673541
Publisher: JABberwocky Literary Agency, Inc.
Publication date: 01/25/2019
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 597,601
File size: 735 KB

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Phytosphere 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
sensitivemuse on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
These kinds of books never cease to amaze me. Maybe because I¿m into bleak books and the struggle to survival is something I look to enjoy for an entertaining read. Although, sometimes I get these types of books and read them so that I can learn to appreciate what¿s around me more and to not take things for granted all the time (in other words, so I can learn how to count my blessings once in a while). You certainly feel this way when you read through Phytosphere. Naturally of course, this is something that¿s virtually impossible to picture happening to us (although, you¿ll never know!). Yet the lessons are still noted and although not fully learned, you do feel as if you need to appreciate something, or someone to feel good after reading this book.It¿s pretty bleak. Especially with Glenda and her kids. The moments where she confronts the `policemen¿ are especially chilling and very realistic. I cannot quite picture how I would deal with this situation myself, but Glenda proves to be strong and manages to keep it together with her children. It¿s admirable and although the kids play cliched roles, the story arc involving them and Glenda provides a good read. You can also feel the frustration and helplessness of Gerry as he¿s millions of miles away (literally) and his much more `smarter¿ and more successful brother undermines Gerry¿s ideas, refuses to listen to him and persuades others to ignore them. It¿s a little obvious to the reader what might befall Neil (Gerry¿s brother) in the end, but you can¿t help but feel that certain satisfaction when it does happen.There are quite a number of thrilling action moments, which makes the reading of this book go faster and more exciting. I would have to say, although the majority of the plot is very good and I had fun reading it, it just sounds too cliche and could make for a cheesy sci fi flick shown on television. Also, although there was a good description on the Tarsalans and their behavior I wanted to know more about them. There wasn¿t much information except they wanted access to Earth and have been negotiating with regards to immigration. There¿s a bit of information given here and there throughout the novel but it still doesn¿t feel like a complete explanation. Unless there¿s a book that precedes the events before Phytosphere (which I am not aware of, and if there is one, please let me know) it feels as if there¿s information lacking and you¿re left with a tidbit of information on the aliens when there should have been more offered to round out the story a bit more. A cliche storyline, with its thrilling moments, and its bleak moments. A few holes in the plot, however with all of this, the book is still worth a read. Do give this a try. It¿s worth it, just for an entertaining read.
Sensitivemuse More than 1 year ago
These kinds of books never cease to amaze me. Maybe because I'm into bleak books and the struggle to survival is something I look to enjoy for an entertaining read. Although, sometimes I get these types of books and read them so that I can learn to appreciate what's around me more and to not take things for granted all the time (in other words, so I can learn how to count my blessings once in a while). You certainly feel this way when you read through Phytosphere. Naturally of course, this is something that's virtually impossible to picture happening to us (although, you'll never know!). Yet the lessons are still noted and although not fully learned, you do feel as if you need to appreciate something, or someone to feel good after reading this book. It's pretty bleak. Especially with Glenda and her kids. The moments where she confronts the 'policemen' are especially chilling and very realistic. I cannot quite picture how I would deal with this situation myself, but Glenda proves to be strong and manages to keep it together with her children. It's admirable and although the kids play cliched roles, the story arc involving them and Glenda provides a good read. You can also feel the frustration and helplessness of Gerry as he's millions of miles away (literally) and his much more 'smarter' and more successful brother undermines Gerry's ideas, refuses to listen to him and persuades others to ignore them. It's a little obvious to the reader what might befall Neil (Gerry's brother) in the end, but you can't help but feel that certain satisfaction when it does happen. There are quite a number of thrilling action moments, which makes the reading of this book go faster and more exciting. I would have to say, although the majority of the plot is very good and I had fun reading it, it just sounds too cliche and could make for a cheesy sci fi flick shown on television. Also, although there was a good description on the Tarsalans and their behavior I wanted to know more about them. There wasn't much information except they wanted access to Earth and have been negotiating with regards to immigration. There's a bit of information given here and there throughout the novel but it still doesn't feel like a complete explanation. Unless there's a book that precedes the events before Phytosphere (which I am not aware of, and if there is one, please let me know) it feels as if there's information lacking and you're left with a tidbit of information on the aliens when there should have been more offered to round out the story a bit more. A cliche storyline, with its thrilling moments, and its bleak moments. A few holes in the plot, however with all of this, the book is still worth a read. Do give this a try. It's worth it, just for an entertaining read.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Angry as they failed to gain special status including expediting of immigration to earth, the Tarsalans decide honey does not work they turn to vinegar to force the recalcitrant earthlings to agree to their terms. They do this by constructing a phytosphere curtain around the planet that keeps sunlight from reaching earth.-------------- On the Moon, alcoholic scientist Gerry Thorndike feverishly works on a means to eliminate the phytosphere that is destroying the planet and subsequently his family as his wife Glenda, struggles to put food on the table and protect their children from marauders willing to kill for a meal on a world in which the lack of sunlight is turning Earth into a wasteland.------------------------ This is a refreshing alien invasion tale that also provides a warning on a curtain (pollution) blocking the sun. The story line rotates between two fault lines that are quite different in design. On the one hand, the fascinating debates between the two brothers is quite interesting as the science seems pertinent, but in fairness also takes away from the dying earth doomsday countdown as time has run out. The other segue focuses on Glenda¿s survival track as she battles with odious officials demanding handouts or else, now nasty neighbors turned into deadly enemies and the foreboding Tarsalans. PHYTOSPHERE is an innovative well written apocalyptic science fiction thriller.----------- Harriet Klausner