Picking Yourself Up And Starting All Over Again

Picking Yourself Up And Starting All Over Again

by Paul B Beckwith

Paperback

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Overview

Debt is the unfortunate downside to the freedoms afforded to us by life in a consumer society. From student loans to credit cards, finance deals to mortgages, our economy is founded on consumer debt.

Let Paul Beckwith be your guide through the minefield of debt. His practical, easy-to-follow guide will teach you how to set achievable goals, how to make a budget, how to take responsibility for your own money problems, and in so doing, how to get out - and stay out - of debt.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781844016266
Publisher: New Generation Publishing Ltd
Publication date: 08/23/2006
Pages: 72
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.17(d)

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Picking Yourself Up And Starting All Over Again 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
garydale on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Do you operate on a budget? And if so do you keep within the budget? Do you find yourself scrambling to figure out where your salary has gone after only a short week or two into the month? Maybe this book is for you¿Paul Beckwith¿s book, Picking Yourself Up and Starting All Over Again, is rather short, only 70 odd pages, but it is full of good advice on how not to go broke. In many ways it is written more like a pamphlet and even has almost the feel of one. In a way this is the beauty of the book. Anyone who wants to pretty much can make it through in one sitting. Beckwith has provided many tables inside the book to illustrate the points that he is pushing about spending habits. One thing I did notice though was that the author didn¿t spend a whole lot of time talking about saving and investing but rather spent most of the book describing how to steer one¿s spending back on course. And there is nothing wrong with that!When I originally picked up this book I thought that it was actually for someone who had hit rock bottom ¿ someone who¿d actually gone bankrupt and is being forced to pick up the pieces of their lives. Actually though, Paul Beckwith has written the book for people who are overspending and need to get back within their boundaries. The author gives many examples where fat can be trimmed out of the readers¿ budgets and he even proffers advice on determining whether or not the reader is actually in the right profession.The book is good for anyone but seems to be written more for those readers based in the United Kingdom. Paul Beckwith is a professional financial expert in the United Kingdom so his advice, although brief, comes with a back up of a lot of experience about the spending habits of modern day Britons. The advice is given in straightforward, almost dry language that is in a typically more formal style than it would have been written perhaps if the author was an American. But this is no reason whatsoever to not read the book. I found the book very handy at giving small tips on where to look in my life for the ¿financial waste¿. And although I am not in debt I do believe that much of Beckwith¿s advice about spending pertained directly to me. He¿s very much a waste not, want not sort of guy.
garydale More than 1 year ago
Do you operate on a budget? And if so do you keep within the budget? Do you find yourself scrambling to figure out where your salary has gone after only a short week or two into the month? Maybe this book is for you¿

Paul Beckwith¿s book, Picking Yourself Up and Starting All Over Again, is rather short, only 70 odd pages, but it is full of good advice on how not to go broke. In many ways it is written more like a pamphlet and even has almost the feel of one. In a way this is the beauty of the book. Anyone who wants to pretty much can make it through in one sitting. Beckwith has provided many tables inside the book to illustrate the points that he is pushing about spending habits. One thing I did notice though was that the author didn¿t spend a whole lot of time talking about saving and investing but rather spent most of the book describing how to steer one¿s spending back on course. And there is nothing wrong with that!

When I originally picked up this book I thought that it was actually for someone who had hit rock bottom ¿ someone who¿d actually gone bankrupt and is being forced to pick up the pieces of their lives. Actually though, Paul Beckwith has written the book for people who are overspending and need to get back within their boundaries. The author gives many examples where fat can be trimmed out of the readers¿ budgets and he even proffers advice on determining whether or not the reader is actually in the right profession.

The book is good for anyone but seems to be written more for those readers based in the United Kingdom. Paul Beckwith is a professional financial expert in the United Kingdom so his advice, although brief, comes with a back up of a lot of experience about the spending habits of modern day Britons. The advice is given in straightforward, almost dry language that is in a typically more formal style than it would have been written perhaps if the author was an American. But this is no reason whatsoever to not read the book. I found the book very handy at giving small tips on where to look in my life for the ¿financial waste¿. And although I am not in debt I do believe that much of Beckwith¿s advice about spending pertained directly to me. He¿s very much a waste not, want not sort of guy.