The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde

The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde

by Oscar Wilde

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Overview

Basil Hallward, an artist, meets Dorian Gray and paints his portrait. The artist is so infatuated with Dorian's beauty that he begins to believe it is the reason for his quality of art. Dorian becomes convinced that beauty is all-important and wishes his portrait could age instead of him. Beware of what you have wish for! Each time Dorian commits a sin his portrait ages, showing him what is happening to his soul.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781604244670
Publisher: Standard Publications, Incorporated
Publication date: 11/08/2007
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 208
Product dimensions: 7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.44(d)

About the Author

The ever-quotable Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet who delighted Victorian England with his legendary wit. He found critical and popular success with his scintillating plays, chiefly The Importance of Being Earnest, while his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, scandalized readers. Imprisoned for two years for homosexual behavior, Wilde moved to France after his release, where he died destitute.

Date of Birth:

October 16, 1854

Date of Death:

November 30, 1900

Place of Birth:

Dublin, Ireland

Place of Death:

Paris, France

Education:

The Royal School in Enniskillen, Dublin, 1864; Trinity College, Dublin, 1871; Magdalen College, Oxford, England, 1874

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Picture of Dorian Gray. Oscar Wilde 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 498 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Still not completely sure how I feel about this novel. Oscar Wilde is a very good writer but some elements of the plot were dreadfully insipid. Symbolism dominants the story and it was interestimg to analyze that...but I never felt unity between the author and his characters. The ebook format was stunning!
amydross on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I love Wilde, but this is not one of my favorites: self-indulgent and overwrought, lacking the sparkling precision of his plays. Lord Henry is supposed to be shocking and funny and irresistably witty, but his epigrams sound as vapid and mass-produced as bumper stickers. Dorian himself is a pretty weak character on whom to hang a story. The endless descriptions of jewels and tapestries are wearing. Sadly, even homoerotic subtext can't save this unconvincing mess of a morality tale.
jedimarri on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
My first introduction to "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde was the inclusion of his character in the movie "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen." After reading "Dracula" recently I decided I wanted to go and read other classics in the genre of the fantastic. I was amazed when I learned that it was by Oscar Wilde!When I was younger I was part of a program called "Home Link." It was a school designed to allow the home schoolers in the area (we have a lot of them!) take elective type classes that are hard to teach at home. One of the classes that was offered was drama - and me being me - I of course took it!In 9th grade we spent the entire year working on producing "The Importance of Being Ernest," by Oscar Wilde. Why we spent a whole year on it is a story for another time and place, but it was an experience I'll always treasure. I played Lady Augusta Bracknel, and by the end of the year I could quote that play back and forth! All three acts, and Lady Bracknel didn't even appear in the second act! I could quote large portions of it for years afterwards.Reading "Dorian Gray" brought back a lot of memories for me. Obviously the two stories are very different, but the writing style was most definitely recognizable as Oscar Wilde. He has a way of having his characters say the most absurd things, but making them seem to make sense in the scene.The story of "The Picture of Dorian Gray" is in many ways a story on the nature of sin and how it changes you. A painter friend of Dorian's creates a master piece portrait of Dorian. Prompted by some comments of a mutual friend of theirs, Dorian idly wishes that he could remain youthful and "pretty" forever, and that the painting could change instead.For whatever reason, his prayers are answered. Dorian never grows older, but every sin and stain on his soul shows up in vivid detail on his painting. Scared at first, Dorian begins to enjoy his freedom and pursues whatever catches his fancy.I found the progression of his descent to be interesting, although at one point the musings that Wilde went into got a little tiresome. I would say more about the end and the consequences, but I'd rather let you read the book for yourself! Be prepared though for the Victorian turns of phrase and ideas. If your not used to it you might find it a hard read.
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