The Pilgrim's Progress from this world to that which is to come

The Pilgrim's Progress from this world to that which is to come

by John Bunyan

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Overview

The Pilgrim's Progress from this world to that which is to come by John Bunyan

The Pilgrim's Progress from this world to that which is to come
By John Bunyan

This book was originally published prior to 1923, and represents a reproduction of an important historical work, maintaining the same format as the original work. While some publishers have opted to apply OCR (optical character recognition) technology to the process, we believe this leads to sub-optimal results (frequent typographical errors, strange characters and confusing formatting) and does not adequately preserve the historical character of the original artifact. We believe this work is culturally important in its original archival form. While we strive to adequately clean and digitally enhance the original work, there are occasionally instances where imperfections such as blurred or missing pages, poor pictures or errant marks may have been introduced due to either the quality of the original work or the scanning process itself. Despite these occasional imperfections, we have brought it back into print as part of our ongoing global book preservation commitment, providing customers with access to the best possible historical reprints. We appreciate your understanding of these occasional imperfections, and sincerely hope you enjoy seeing the book in a format as close as possible to that intended by the original publisher.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781727590586
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 09/29/2018
Pages: 148
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.32(d)

About the Author

John Bunyan ( baptised on November 30, 1628 - August 31, 1688) was an English writer and Puritan preacher best remembered as the author of the Christian allegory The Pilgrim's Progress. In addition to The Pilgrim's Progress, Bunyan wrote nearly sixty titles, many of them expanded sermons.
Bunyan came from the village of Elstow, near Bedford. He had some schooling and at the age of sixteen joined the Parliamentary army during the first stage of the English Civil War. After three years in the army he returned to Elstow and took up the trade of tinker, which he had learned from his father. He became interested in religion after his marriage, attending first the parish church and then joining the Bedford Meeting, a nonconformist group in Bedford, and becoming a preacher. After the restoration of the monarch, when the freedom of nonconformists was curtailed, Bunyan was arrested and spent the next twelve years in jail as he refused to give up preaching. During this time he wrote a spiritual autobiography, Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners, and began work on his most famous book, The Pilgrim's Progress, which was not published until some years after his release.

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1 Christian Falls

As I walked through the wilderness of this world, I lighted on a certain place where was a den, and I laid me down in that place to sleep; and, as I slept, I dreamed a dream. I dreamed, and behold, I saw a man clothed with rags, standing in a certain place, with his face from his own house, a book in his hand, and a great burden upon his back.' I looked, and saw him open the book, and read therein; and, as he read, he wept and trembled; and not being able longer to contain, he brake out with a lamentable cry, saying, "What shall I do?"

In this plight therefore he went home, and refrained himself as long as he could, that his wife and children should not perceive his distress; but he could not be silent long, because that his trouble increased. Wherefore at length he brake his mind to his wife and children; and thus he began to talk to them: "0 my dear wife," said he, "and you, the children of my bowels, 1, your dear friend, am in myself undone, by reason of a burden that lieth hard upon me; moreover, I am for certain informed that this our city will be burnt with fire from heaven; in which fearful overthrow, both myself, with thee my wife, and you my sweet babes, shall miserably come to ruin, except (the which yet I see not) some way of escape can be found, whereby we may be delivered." At this his relations were sore amazed; not for that they believed that what he had said to them was true, but because they thought that some frenzy distemper had got into his head; therefore, it drawing towards night, and they hoping that sleep might settle his brains, with all haste they got him to bed. But the night was as troublesome to him as the day; wherefore, instead of sleeping, he spent it in sighs and tears. So, when the morning was come, they would know how he did; he told them, "Worse and worse." He also set to talking to them again; but they began to be hardened. They also thought to drive away his distemper by harsh and surly carriages to him; sometimes they would deride, sometimes they would chide, and sometimes they would quite neglect him. Wherefore he began to retire himself to his chamber to pray for and pity them, and also to condole his own misery; he would also walk solitarily in the fields, sometimes reading, and sometimes praying: and thus for some days he spent his time.

Now I saw, upon a time, when he was walking in the fields, that he was, as he was wont, reading in his book, and greatly distressed in his mind; and as he read, he burst out, as he had done before, crying, "What shall I do to be saved?"

I saw also that he looked this way and that way, as if he would run; yet he stood still, because, as I perceived, he could not tell which way to go. I looked then, and saw a man named Evangelist coming to him, and asked, "Wherefore dost thou cry?" He answered, "Sir, I perceive by the book in my hand that I am condemned to die, and after that to come to judgment; and I find that I am not willing to do the first, nor able to do the second."

Then said Evangelist, "Why not willing to die, since this life is attended with so many evils?" The man answered, "Because I. fear that this burden that is upon my back will sink me lower than the grave, and I shall fall into Tophet. And, sir, if I be not fit to go to prison, I am not fit, I am sure, to go to judgment, and from thence to execution; and the thoughts of these things make me cry."

Then said Evangelist, "If this be thy condition, why standest thou still?" He answered, "Because I know not whither to go." Then he gave him a parchment roll, and there was written within, "Fly from the wrath to come."

The man therefore read it, and looking upon Evangelist very carefully, said, "Whither must I fly?" Then said Evangelist, pointing with his finger over a very wide field, "Do you see yonder Wicket-gate?" The man said, "No." Then said the other, "Do you see yonder shining light?" He said, "I think I do." Then said Evangelist, "Keep that light in your eye, and go up directly thereto: so shalt thou see the gate; at which, when thou knockest, it shall be told thee what thou shalt do."

So I saw in my dream that the man began to run. Now he had not run far from his own door, but his wife and children, perceiving it, began to cry after him to return; but the man put his fingers in his ears, and ran on, crying, "Life! life! eternal life!" So he looked not behind him, but fled towards the middle of the plain.

The neighbours also came out to see him run; and as he ran, some mocked, others threatened, and some cried after him to return; and among those that did so, there were two that were resolved to fetch him back by force. The name of the one was Obstinate, and the name of the other Pliable. Now, by this time, the man was got a good distance from them; but, however, they were resolved to pursue him, which they did, and in a little time they overtook him. Then said the man, "Neighbours, wherefore are you come?" They said, "To persuade you to go back with us." But he said, "That can by no means be; you dwell," said he, "in the City of Destruction, the place also where I was born: I see it to be so; and, dying there, sooner or later, you will sink lower than the grave, into a Place that bums with fire and brimstone: be content, good neighbours, and go along with me."

OBSTINATE: "What! And leave our friends and our comforts behind us?"

CHRISTIAN: "Yes, because that all which you shall forsake is not worthy to be compared with a little of that that I am seeking to enjoy;" and if you will go along with me, and hold it, you shall fare as I myself; for there where I go, is enough and to spare. Come away, and prove my words."

OBSTINATE: "What are the things you seek, since you leave all the world to find them?"

CHRISTIAN: "I seek an inheritance incorruptible, undefiled, and that fadeth not away, and it is laid up in heaven, and safe there, to be bestowed at the time appointed, on them that diligently seek it. Read it so, if you will, in my book."

OBSTINATE: "Tush, away with your book; will you go back with us, or no?"

CHRISTIAN: "No, not I, because I have laid my hand to the plough."

OBSTINATE: "Come, then, Neighbour Pliable, let us turn again, and go home without him; there is a company of these crazed-headed coxcombs that, when they* take a fancy by the end, are wiser in their own eyes than seven men that can render a reason."

PLIABLE: "Don't revile; if what the good Christian says is true, the things he looks after are bet-ter than ours: my heart inclines to go with my neighbour."

OBSTINATE: "What! more fools still? Be ruled by me, and go back; who knows whither such a brainsick fellow will lead you? Go back, go back, and be wise."

Table of Contents

Introductionvii
A Note on the Textxxiii
Chronology of Bunyan's Lifexxiv
Suggestions for Further Readingxxvii
The Pilgrim's Progress (First Part)1
The Pilgrim's Progress (Second Part)145
Notes279

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The Pilgrim's Progress, From This World To That Which Is To Come 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had been searching for an 'authentic' translation of Pilgrim's Progress when I stumbled upon Cheryl V. Ford's unabridged, modern version of this terrific book. This particular translation includes many margin notes which are helpful in the full understanding of such a powerful work
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved it !! Its a great book for young and old! Its' awsome!! It's the perfect book too teach christians how to handel the trials that come into their lives. Read it . . . it will do you good!! God Bless! ~ Cerasi =)
paulDare More than 1 year ago
I've wanted to finish the Old English, original version of John Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress this year. I've finally done it. I have to admit, there were some tough times trying to get through this version. Case in point: "...for there was now no let in their way, no, not there where but now they were stopped with a pit." That one made the kids chuckle. But making it through the entire book was worth it. Knowing the context in which this wonderful allegory was written and experiencing that humble tinker painting pictures in my mind using beautiful language is worth every page. Some have said that The Pilgrim's Progress is the most widely read book of all time, next to the Bible. If you take the time to read through it, you'll understand why. Bunyan knew the human heart well, he knew the struggles of living the Christian life well and he knew the many different strengths and weaknesses of God's people, even after they are saved. He captured these things throughout this work and the story comes across not only highly entertaining and engaging, but also instructive and encouraging. If you have ever wanted to read this 17th century classic, but are scared or turned off by some of the archaic language, I would highly recommend Edward Hazelbaker's modern English version. It has excellent retention of the original flow of thought, but includes great cross references and thorough explanatory notes at the end of each chapter.
theologicaldan on LibraryThing 15 hours ago
This is a classic for good reason. While it was written three hundred years ago, the characters come to life and shed light on the struggle of living as a Christian. This is a must read.
readingrat on LibraryThing 15 hours ago
I throughly enjoyed this book. There are so many references to this work throughout modern and classic literature that it was interesting to finally hear the original work. Furthermore, I highly recommend listening to the public domain audio recording of this book found at librivox.com. Although these audio files are not professionally done, the English woman who reads this work for Librivox has a wonderful voice that really compliments the work and brings the book to life.
andyray on LibraryThing 16 hours ago
This is the complete edition,. including the wife's journey to the Celestial City and JB's afterword. I was raised on the first part of the book. I attended a summer camp called Pilgrim Camp on the north end of Brant Lake, New York, where they studied this book as hard or harder than the Bible (at least, in the younger years of under 10), and I am glad they did. PP is a wonderfully spiritual allegory every child should read WITH his family.Publishing just the first section, however, seems to be the rule rather than the exception. I had a lovely 16" x 12" 1898 volume with aleather-covered and etched cover, engravings by Andre Dore on every few pages, I bought in Daytona Beach in 1968 for $80.00. Heaven knows how much it goes for now. This story gets better in quality as our lives get more spiritless in quantity.
pickwick817 on LibraryThing 7 days ago
This is a book that must have been groundbreaking for its time. I did not enjoy it too much. Christian, the main character has almost an obstacle course of sinners and evil to pass through to get to his final destination. I found myself hoping he would fail rather than succeed.