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Pink!
     

Pink!

by Lynne Rickards, Margaret Chamberlain (Illustrator)
 

What's a penguin to do when he turns a really rosy hue? Ends up friendship's not just black and white: Being hot pink is pretty cool!

When Patrick wakes up one day to find he has inexplicably turned bright pink, he sees red: "Whoever heard of a pink penguin?" he cries. "And boys can't be pink!" After too much teasing, he's had enough. "I don't fit in

Overview


What's a penguin to do when he turns a really rosy hue? Ends up friendship's not just black and white: Being hot pink is pretty cool!

When Patrick wakes up one day to find he has inexplicably turned bright pink, he sees red: "Whoever heard of a pink penguin?" he cries. "And boys can't be pink!" After too much teasing, he's had enough. "I don't fit in here anymore," he tells his parents. "I'm going to Africa to see the flamingos." But poor Patrick doesn't fit in with them, either: He can't stand on one leg, skim the water for food, or fly off with the rest of the flock. So he returns home--and everyone is happy to see him! In fact, his friends are green with envy over his exotic trip. Ends up being hot pink is pretty cool!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Patrick the penguin awakens one morning to find he's inexplicably turned pink "from head to foot." "Boys can't be pink!" he declares in all-capital letters. The doctor has no explanation (none is ever offered), but Patrick's dad points out that flamingos in Africa are pink and "at least half" are boys. Tired of being teased, Patrick swims to Africa and tries, unsuccessfully, to fit in with the friendly flamingos. Returning home, he is welcomed and respected for his adventure, and happily resigns himself to being forever pink: "Being different wasn't so bad after all." Although Chamberlain's comical illustrations suit the exclamatory tone of the text, the book is loud and busy. Blurring a retro message about gender coding with a lesson about "difference," the story fails to inspire sympathy for Patrick or offer solace to kids who might share Patrick's feelings. Design choices don't help; the erratic placement of text turns many pages into a jumble of words fighting for space with the images. Ages 4-8. (Jan.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Children's Literature - Carolyn Mott Ford
Patrick is a penguin who, for some unknown reason, has turned pink. Bright pink. He is quite alarmed, especially when Doctor Black cannot seem to help him. Patrick shouts, "Boys can't be pink." His father shows him pictures of flamingoes and points out that many of them are boys. After being teased at school, Patrick decides to take off for Africa to visit the flamingoes. He swims for seven days and seven nights to get to Africa and although he finds the flamingoes, it doesn't take too long for him to realize that he really does not fit in with these long-legged creatures. Patrick swims back home where he finds his schoolmates eager to hear of his travels. He no longer feels strange and decides that "Being different isn't so bad after all." The penguin trying to fit in with the flamingoes brings interest to the story, but the theme and the ending are rather pat. Reviewer: Carolyn Mott Ford
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1

One day, Patrick the penguin wakes up pink. When his classmates make fun of him, he swims to Africa to meet the flamingos. But he doesn't fit in there either, so he heads home. His friends are impressed with his journey and happy to see him, prompting him to decide that his mom was right-being different is not so bad. This rehashing of the theme of accepting one's differences includes humor, but Patrick's classmates' turnaround is a bit facile, and nothing is truly new here. Charmberlain's bright cartoon illustrations are reminiscent of Mary Murphy's work, although somewhat more detailed. Patrick is, well, very pink, with his feet an impressive shade of fuchsia. While the text is set in a typeface that can be hard to decipher at times, the story reads aloud smoothly and reflects a childlike sensibility. However, some literal-minded youngsters may want a bit more explanation for why the penguin became pink and whether or not he will stay that way. For another take on accepting differences that includes flamingos, pick up a copy of Ellen Stoll Walsh's For Pete's Sake (Harcourt, 1998).-Amy Lilien-Harper, The Ferguson Library, Stamford, CT

Kirkus Reviews
"Whoever heard of a pink penguin?" and "BOYS CAN'T BE PINK!" exclaims Patrick when he inexplicably wakes up covered in the pastel hue. After being teased at school, the young bird swims to the coast of Africa, where he finds hundreds of flamingos-boys and girls-all pink. While the flamingos skim their long, curvy beaks to catch fish, stand on one leg to take a nap and fly to their nesting ground at sunset, Patrick is left coughing and sputtering, hopelessly wobbling and all alone. His return to the South Pole elicits wonder and, finally, acceptance from his classmates-and himself. Chamberlain's stylized cartoon illustrations with vibrant splashes of color exaggerate the silliness and cheer as this penguin learns to march to the beat of his own drummer. For another look at unconventional penguins, pair with And Tango Makes Three. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780545086080
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2009
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
AD510L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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