The Pirates of Somalia: Inside Their Hidden World

The Pirates of Somalia: Inside Their Hidden World

by Jay Bahadur
3.8 20

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Overview

The Pirates of Somalia: Inside Their Hidden World by Jay Bahadur

The first close-up look at the hidden world of Somali pirates by a young journalist who dared to make his way into their remote havens and spent a year infiltrating their lives.
 
For centuries, stories of pirates have captured imaginations around the world. The recent ragtag bands of pirates off the coast of Somalia, hijacking multimillion-dollar tankers owned by international shipping conglomerates, have brought the scourge of piracy into the modern era. Jay Bahadur’s riveting narrative exposé—the first of its kind—looks at who these men are, how they live, the forces that created piracy in Somalia, how the pirates spend the ransom money, how they deal with their hostages, among much, much more. It is a revelation of a dangerous world at the epicenter of political and natural disaster.
 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307476562
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/21/2012
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 484,654
Product dimensions: 5.36(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.68(d)

About the Author

Jay Bahadur’s articles have appeared in The Times (London), The New York Times, the Financial Times, and The Globe and Mail (Toronto). He has advised the United States State Department and has worked as a freelance correspondent for CBS News. Bahadur currently lives in Nairobi, where he works as managing editor of the news site Somalia Report.

www.jaybahadur.com
Twitter: @PuntlandPirates

Customer Reviews

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Pirates of Somalia 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
G-Harris More than 1 year ago
This book will give you the inside story of why piracy started in Somalia and how it grew to the epidemic that it is now.I came away with a better understanding of the how a simple protest against illegal fishing turned into a booming business for a band of men hell bent on getting what they think they deserve. The information is broken down so every can understand how the basic operations work and you get both sides of the story,pirates and hostages. Good read if you've ever been curious about the Somali Pirates
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Comes in with her sister, Deerlight. "What? I'm totally fi--" she was interupted by a spurt of coughs.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Looks at u and says u r not fine now everyday come to me and ill give u honey she gets a leaf with honey on it and says hear li<_>ck some of that and she says now that cough is gettin worse we need it to be gone or everyone will get si<_>ck she mumbles to herself
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She ate them, grimaced, and then padded back into the clearing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She nodded. "Of course," she meows, wrapping Pinky's leg up in cobwebs to help it stay in place. Skydrram gives her comfrey. "Here. Eat this,"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"I don't know...and I don't know why I know all these herbs...maybe it's just instinct..." Lightiningkit meowed she heard Mudfur calling her name,"Uh...sorry got to go..." she mewed and ran to the river...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another boulder, much like the one that was the leader's den, sat on the other side of camp. This rock was also covered in ivy, lichen and moss, although it was different and more suited to be the medicine cat den. It had legdes and crevices, probably worn by age, and perfect for storing herbs. It had a pleace both for the medicine cats and the sick or injured cats to sleep.<br> (If you get hurt, come here. But post in camp you are going.)<br> ~$ilverstar
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
....but not too difficult to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Far to slow
BriarAW More than 1 year ago
In summary, starting out as a purely nomadic society, modern times have force the country to fishing. Then international fishers began illegally reaping the benefits of the Somali coast destroying the habitats of the local seafood they pursued. This demolished the local fishing economy, in return some fishermen took up arms and began hijacking the illegal fishing boats. Over the years the situation has escalated to the point where hardened criminals routinely hijack commercial vessels torturing and holding the crew for months until ransoming them for millions of dollars. These million dollar ransoms inspire thoughts of mansions but in reality Somalia remains a poor country and most of the pirates booty is used on khat (a leafy drug) and Land Rovers. Prevalent themes in the book were the communal ingestion of khat a drug much like marijuana and piracy spurring from the illegal fishing boats reckless behavior. The reoccurring political corruption and ineffectiveness to influence their people in any meaningful manner was also explored as a major cause to the crisis. Over all the book seemed to cover every angle on the subject from the citizens to the hijackers to the hostages held for ransom. I liked the style the author used adding in personal perspective and details concerning the mannerisms and appearances of the people and the landscape of Puntland and Somaliland (separate functioning states of Somalia). I found the history of the affair to be covered in a concise and meaningful manner along with the effects and importance of the drug khat in Somali society. However the rationalizing of the author to try and bridge separate accounts given by separate witnesses was unnecessary and unwanted. The author also included antidotes and jokes that were unhelpful to the subject matter and confusing to understand. Over all I would recommend this book to anyone interested in understanding the real truth of the situation, rating it a 4 on a 5 point scale. Even people moderately interested in maritime life and modern politics would enjoy this book immensely. I would also recommend Jay Bahadur's other articles he wrote on the subject for shorter in-depth pieces. They have the same style and commitment featured in his book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In the age of sound and instant news bites, its still worth it to read a book. Once you believe that the author is writing in a way that is truthful, then it is possible to get a less filtered version of major stories such as this. I recommend this book and appreciate Mr. Bahadur's ambition to make a career for himself and find a story worthy of a book. Nook tips: 1. Stiffen the power connector cord that inserts into your Noon, Nook Color or Nook Tablet by straightening the cable about 4 inches. Next, use a stiff rod such as a plastic, a coffee stirrer or split popsicle stick under the cord. Secure everything with scotch tape, plastic ties in such a way that you are able to grasp the cord and insert the end connector without bending the end connector in the process. A word of caution. If you use duct tape, and if you ever have to undo your construction, then you will have a gluey mess on the cord. I suppose you could split a soda straw and sleeve it over the power cord before taping. 2. The charger for a Nook color and Nook Tablet are the same! 3. Search ((0.00 (your favorite topic)) for free media. 4. A microfiber cloth such as those used in car care work great for keeping the Nook screen clean.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought I would find this book intriguing after reading the first chapter from the sample. Now that I am almost 100 pages into the book I feel duped. The first chapter reads like an intriquing story, in fact the book is a dry dump of information gathered from multiple interviews. There is no attempt to describe and bring to life the individuals and places the author experienced. To me this author missed a great opportunity to tell a facinating story. Although it is short I don't think I have the perserverence to finish the book.
Chuckupd More than 1 year ago
I already had a great interest in the region, owing to my long-standing interest in the fascinating story of neighboring Somaliland (democratic, stable, unrecognized, pirateless). I was interested to learn more about the culture of this region, and a story that also happens to be about Pirates seemed like just the thing. I was certainly not disappointed. It's both very enlightening and fun to read.
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