Planet of the Apes

Planet of the Apes

by Pierre Boulle
4.3 44

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)

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Overview

Planet of the Apes by Pierre Boulle

Before you see the movie, read the original novel!

First published more than thirty-five years ago, Pierre Boulle’s chilling novel launched one of the greatest science fiction sagas in motion picture history, from the classic 1968 movie starring Charlton Heston and Roddy McDowell, through four sequels and two television series . . . and now the newest film adaptation directed by Tim Burton.

In the not-too-distant future, three astronauts land on what appears to be a planet just like Earth, with lush forests, a temperate climate, and breathable air. But while it appears to be a paradise, nothing is what it seems.

They soon discover the terrifying truth: On this world humans are savage beasts, and apes rule as their civilized masters. In an ironic novel of nonstop action and breathless intrigue, one man struggles to unlock the secret of a terrifying civilization, all the while wondering: Will he become the savior of the human race, or the final witness to its damnation? In a shocking climax that rivals that of the original movie, Boulle delivers the answer in a masterpiece of adventure, satire, and suspense.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780345447982
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 05/28/2001
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 272
Sales rank: 86,601
Product dimensions: 4.16(w) x 6.86(h) x 0.74(d)
Age Range: 14 - 18 Years

About the Author

Pierre Boulle was born in Avignon, France in 1912. He originally trained as an engineer, but in 1936 went to Malaysia as a rubber planter. In 1939 he was called up in the French forces in Indochina. When France fell during World War II, he fled to Singapore, where he joined the Free French Mission. After the Japanese invasion, he was sent via Rangoon and the Burma Road to Yunnan to establish contact with Kuomintang forces. He infiltrated Indochina as a guerilla where he was captured in 1943. He escaped in 1944, was picked up by a British plane, and served in the Special Forces in Calcutta for the rest of the war.

His first novel published in the United States was The Bridge on the River Kwai. It was awarded the Prix Ste. Beuve in France, and led to the motion picture that received an amazing seven Academy Awards. He considered his subsequent books, of which Planet of the Apes is the most well-known, to be social fantasies.

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Planet of the Apes 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 44 reviews.
Sabin_Knight More than 1 year ago
I found this book very interesting. I have always been a fan of the movie series, so thought I would check out the source material. It is a very quick read, but well worth it. I would love to discuss certain parts of the book on here, but I don't want to spoil it for anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is more enjoyable than sex. That is all.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Three men set off for Betelgeuse, a journey that takes two years from their viewpoint. Thanks to relativity, though, centuries pass on Earth. Journalist Ulysse Merou and his two companions encounter no difficulty establishing orbit around a habitable planet and descending to its surface in their space ship's launch. Once there, they make first contact with the planet's Human inhabitants under what they don't understand to be fortuitous circumstances. They're swimming naked, on a hot day, when a beautiful and equally bare Human female notices them and approaches. She reacts violently to the presence of their pet chimpanzee, and runs away in horror when she realizes that the clothes piled nearby belong to these members of her own species. Nova, as Merou names the woman, brings others to see the newcomers. Stripped of all their technology, and even of their clothing, the three Earthmen have just started trying to understand these people when they - along with the tribe they've unwillingly joined - become targets of an organized hunt. The hunters are gorillas, assisted by chimpanzees. While most of the tribe's members are slaughtered, including one of Merou's companions, he and Professor Antelle (the Betelgeuse expedition's leader) are among the 'lucky' captured ones. Alive, but separated, with Merou winding up caged in what he soon learns is a laboratory. Author Boulle uses the role reversal he's thus established, of apes vs. Humans, to stage a chilling and succinct morality play. At first it seems that his main theme is Humankind's lack of compassion toward 'lesser' yet highly intelligent creatures (our own planet's various ape species), but as the book progresses the reader realizes he has a far more disturbing agenda. Boulle's real concern is what makes Humans - well - human. What qualities do we possess that have combined to give us dominance over all of Earth's other species? Is it possible we might sacrifice that dominance, one day, on the altar of sloth and/or other flaws indulged instead of conquered? Witty, brutally clever, and filled with material so 'hot to handle' that I'm not a bit surprised most of it never made the transition from novel to motion picture script, this venture by a mainstream writer into speculative fiction fully shares the wonderful irony of Boulle's at least equally famous (and, I suspect, far more widely read) THE BRIDGE OVER THE RIVER KWAI. This is satire at its finest, a book to make readers sputter with laughter and shiver with fright simultaneously.
Anonymous 5 months ago
What can I say have read this 4 times now. Always a worthy read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read the book as teenager when it came out. I knew the movie was not true to the book but now that i read it again i appreciate the moral issues and the application of physics at the heart of the story that are completely ignored by the movie which missed all the points by embracing cold war paranoia. The story is amazingly thought provoking. I knew the movie dumbed down the story but realized how much of importance was not in the movie after reading the book a second time fifty years later.
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I grew up watching the movies and enjoy all of them. This book is simply amazing its got so much more detail and takes its time unlike the movie and im glad i have devoured every page of this book and enjoyed it. I think they should make a movie more close to the book the original movie as good as it was could of been better by staying closer to the book. I def give this book 5/5 stars absolutely amazing
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Simply amazing and brilliantly written. You're pulled through Ulysses' struggle to assert his mind and soul, and you rejoice alongside him in his triumph, only to come full circle with his bizzare and catastrophic return to Earth.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
First off let me be clear: the book and the movie (any version of the movie you care to name) have very little in common. Therefore disregard any precocieved ideas you have. The book reminds me of jules verne in its style... not really able to articulate why, but that is high praise. Its well worth reading and you really ought to do yourself the favor of reading it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I don't care for the modernized cover but what a good book. A must read.
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FONOMONAL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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