Plum Wine: A Novel

Plum Wine: A Novel

by Angela Davis-Gardner
4.0 7

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Overview

Plum Wine: A Novel by Angela Davis-Gardner

    Barbara Jefferson, a young American teaching in Tokyo in the 1960s, is set on a life-changing quest when her Japanese surrogate mother, Michi, dies, leaving her a tansu of homemade plum wines wrapped in rice paper. Within the papers Barbara discovers writings in Japanese calligraphy that comprise a startling personal narrative. With the help of her translator, Seiji Okada, Barbara begins to unravel the mysteries of Michi's life, a story that begins in the early twentieth century and continues through World War II and its aftermath.
     As Barbara and Seiji translate the plum wine papers they form an intimate bond, with Michi a ghostly third in what becomes an increasingly uneasy triangle. Barbara is deeply affected by the revelation that Michi and Seiji are hibakusha, survivors of the atomic bombing in Hiroshima, and even harder for her to understand are the devastating psychological effects wrought by war. Plum Wine examines human relationships, cultural differences, and the irreparable consequences of war in a story that is both original and timeless.

2007 A Notable Fiction Book of 2007, selected by the Kiriyama Prize Committee   Winner, Fiction Award, Southern Independent Bookstore Alliance   Notable Fiction, Kiriyama Pacific Rim Book Prize

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780299211639
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Publication date: 04/01/2006
Series: Library of American Fiction
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 332
Sales rank: 295,290
File size: 19 MB
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About the Author

Angela Davis-Gardner is the author of two critically acclaimed novels, Felice and Forms of Shelter. Her short stories and personal essays have appeared in numerous literary magazines including Shenandoah and The Greensboro Review. She is professor of creative writing at North Carolina State University.

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Plum Wine 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book took me back to the years I spent in Japan. One of my favorite places in Japan was village called Yoshino Baigo where plum blossoms were spectacular. I really enjoyed the author's description of Japan, its villages, its people, and their culture. The time to read this book was time well spent - I'll hang onto this book for a reread in the future. Looking forward to reading more from this author.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This love story confronts the issues of how our own personal pain from past experience affects our ability to love in the future. The setting of this book takes you to post Hiroshima Japan. The affects on the people of this place and how it has affected others around the world. Not only does it look at war it also embraces the issues that are placed on children who are not given the love that most children take for granted. Sometimes we can overcome our past and sometimes we cannot. I especially liked the setting of Japan and the descriptions of the beauty of the land. Being able to have a small window into the world of another culture was a pleasure for me. While this was a Love Story it was more about our ability to look at what responsibility we each have to take in our own personal decisions. I believe this to be the best part of this book. While the stories themselves were adequate it was the ability to cause the reader to explore their own feelings regarding themselves and the world that truly made it worth the read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A very graceful read on a difficult and touchy part of Japanese history, the story unwinds and finishes in great tradition of haiku, loved it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The story was well written, there was nothing extraordinary about it.