Policing America: Methods, Issues, Challenges / Edition 4

Policing America: Methods, Issues, Challenges / Edition 4

by Ken Peak
ISBN-10:
0130940992
ISBN-13:
9780130940995
Pub. Date:
06/25/2002
Publisher:
Prentice Hall

Hardcover

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Overview

Policing America: Methods, Issues, Challenges / Edition 4

Designed to put readers "inside" the police officer's uniform, this personally-involving, comprehensive, and timely introduction to police work provides a "real-world" flavor not found in most policing books. Written in an exceptionally reader-friendly open and frank style, it blends the real and the ideal—reflecting the author's more than 30 years' experience as a police administrator and academic. Features boxed articles from Law Enforcement News, and "Practitioner's Perspectives" with short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing.Policing Levels, Roles, and Functions. Police Subculture: The Making of a Cop. Organization and Administration. On Patrol: Personnel, Methods, Functions. Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving. Criminal Investigation. Extraordinary Problems and Methods. Police and the Rule of Law. Accountability: Ethics, Force and Corruption, Discipline. Civil Liability. Issues and Trends. Comparative Perspectives. Technology Review. Challenges of the Future.For those involved/interested in General Policing, Community Policing, and Policing Issues.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780130940995
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Publication date: 06/25/2002
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 477
Product dimensions: 7.38(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.95(d)

About the Author

Ken Peak is a full professor and former chairman of the Department of Criminal Justice, University of Nevada, Reno, where he was named Teacher of the Year by the university's Honor Society. He entered municipal policing in Kansas in 1970 and subsequently held positions as a nine-county criminal justice planner in Kansas; director of a four-state Technical Assistance Institute for the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration; director of university of police at Pittsburg State University (Kansas); acting director of public safety, University of Nevada, Reno; and assistant professor of criminal justice at Wichita State University. His textbooks include Community Policing and Problem Solving: Strategies and Practices (3d ed., with Ronald W. Glensor); Justice Administration: Police, Courts, and Corrections Management (3d ed.); Police Supervision (with Ronald W. Glensor and Larry K. Games); and Policing Communities: Understanding Crime and Solving Problems (an anthology, with R. Glensor and M. Correia). He has published two historical books: Kansas Temperance: Much Ado About Booze, 1870-1920 (with P Peak), and Kansas Bootleggers (with Patrick G. O'Brien). He also has published more than 50 journal articles and book chapters. He served as chairman of the Police Section of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences from 1997-1999 and recently served as president of the Western and Pacific Association of Criminal Justice Educators. His teaching interests include policing, administration, victimology, and comparative justice systems. He received two gubernatorial appointments to statewide criminal justicecommittees while residing in Kansas and holds a doctorate from the University of Kansas.

Read an Excerpt

This fifth edition of Policing America, more than its predecessors, reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day. The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this edition, as well as what the police are doing to prevent - and react to - any future attacks.

Like its forerunners, however, this edition is my best attempt to inform the reader, to the fullest extent possible, of what it is like to wear a police uniform. Because the author brings more than 34 years of both scholarly and policing backgrounds to this effort, the chapters contain a "real world" flavor not found in most policing textbooks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing. New materials have been added throughout, especially with regard to terrorism, three eras of community policing, mitochondrial DNA, crimes against children, cold cases, policing in Iraq, new technologies in research and development, and recent court decisions (other nuances are listed below). Meanwhile, this edition continues to provide updated material and in-dept coverage of such topics as patrol, the police subculture, accountability, civil liability, extraordinary problems and practices, the rule of law, investigations, organization and administration, policing in selected foreign venues, and policing in the future. Disseminated throughout the book are several "Practitioner's Perspectives"—short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing.

There are other pedagogical attributes as well. To continue my attempt to make this textbook more reader-friendly, each chapter in this edition begins with a listing of its key items and concepts and an overview of the chapter (each key term is bolded the first time it is used in the chapter). The textbook also includes “Items for Review,” and “Independent Student Activities,” and “Related Web Sites” at the end of each chapter. It is recommended that the reader examine the review items after reading each chapter in order to get a feel for how well the chapter's are understood. The independent activities and Web sites are also intended to enhance the reader's understanding of the applied aspects of policing. Other instructional aids include the aforementioned “Practitioner's Perspectives,” tables and figures, and boxes with recent news items. Finally, a detailed index at the end of the book facilitates the reader's ability to locate specific topics more quickly. [ An Instructor's Manual/Test Bank is also available for classroom instructors using this textbook.]

From its introduction, by * * * * * *, through the final chapter, the reader is provided with a penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult and challenging occupations in America.

Chapter Organization and Overview

Chapter 1 discusses the history of policing, and Chapter 2 examines the contemporary status of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies; here the focus is on the federal agencies, which have been reorganized in major fashion since the creation of Homeland Security. Chapter 3 examines the police subculture and how ordinary citizens are socialized to the role. The next chapter considers how police agencies are organized and administered and how administrators, middle managers, and supervisors perform their functions. Chapter 5 explores the very important function of patrolling and including its methods and menaces.

Chapter 6 focuses on a rapidly spreading form of policing that is being embraced by thousands of police agencies across the United States and around the world: community oriented policing and problem solving—COPPS. Chapter 7 focuses on criminal investigation, including the highly progressive fields of forensic science and criminalistics, and Chapter 8 looks at several extraordinary police problems and methods with regard to policing terrorism, hate crimes, the mafia; gangs; and the nation's borders. The “rule of law” is discussed in Chapter 9, which delineates the constitutional guidelines that direct and constrain police actions. Chapter 10 looks at police accountability to the public, including the issues of police ethics, use of force, and corruption.

Police civil liability is examined in Chapter 11. Chapter 12 describes a number of trends and issues, including rights of police officers, women and minorities in policing, the private police, unionization, contract and consolidated policing, civilianization and accreditation of police agencies, higher education for police, and police stress. Then, to better understand policing in this country, Chapter 13 analyzes policing in five international venues: Iraq, Saudi Arabia, China, Northern Ireland, and Mexico. Interpol, the international crime-fighting organization, is also discussed.

Chapter 14 examines contemporary police technology, including the myriad uses of computers, electronics, and imaging and communications systems. The development of less-lethal weapons, firearms and other tools are also discussed. Finally, Chapter 15 looks at the police of the future, with emphasis placed on new technologies that could dramatically affect police operations and training. Two appendices, concerning careers in policing and the Police Corps.

Taken in sum, the text provides the reader with a comprehensive and penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult, challenging, and obscure occupations in America.

Acknowledgments

This edition, like its three predecessors, is the result of the professional assistance of several practitioners and publishing people at Prentice Hall. First, I continue to benefit from my friendships and professional associations with Frank Mortimer, Executive Editor, Sarah Holle, Associate Editor and Production Editor, Brian Hyland. The author also wishes to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of the following reviewers * * * * * * * * * * * . Their reviews of this firth edition resulted in many beneficial changes. Also, Michael Goo, Washoe County (Nevada) Sheriff's Office, provided photographic assistance.

Table of Contents

Introduction.
1. Historical Development.
2. Policing Levels, Roles, and Functions.
3. Police Subculture: The Making of a Cop .
4. Organization and Administration.
5. On Patrol: Personnel, Methods, Functions.
6. Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving.
7. Criminal Investigation: The Science of Detection.
8. Extraordinary Problems and Methods.
9. The Rule of Law.
10. Accountability: Ethics, Force and Corruption, Discipline.
11. Civil Liability: Failing the Public Trust.
12. Issues and Trends.
13. Comparative Perspectives.
14. Technology Review.
15. Challenges of the Future.
Appendix I: Career Information.
Appendix II: Related Web Sites.
Appendix III: The Police Corps.
Name Index.
Subject Index.

Preface

Author Ken Peak believes that this, the fourth edition of Policing America, is by far "bigger and better" than its three predecessors, providing a comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing. A new chapter has been added concerning community oriented policing and problem solving. New materials have been added to other chapters as well, including discussions of terrorism, less-than-lethal weapons, hate crimes, stalking, and updated court decisions. Meanwhile, this edition continues to provide in-depth coverage of such topics as patrol, the police subculture, accountability, civil liability, extraordinary problems and practices, the rule of law, investigations, policing in selected foreign venues, and policing in the future.

The author brings more than 30 years of both scholarly and policing backgrounds to this effort; as a result, the chapters contain a "real world" flavor not found in most policing textbooks. Disseminated throughout the book are several "Practitioner's Perspectives"—short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing.

From its introduction, written by Darrel W. Stephens, police chief of Charlotte, North Carolina, through the final chapter, the reader is provided with a penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult and challenging occupations in America.

Pedagogical Attributes

To make this textbook more reader-friendly, each chapter in this fourth edition begins with a listing of its key terms and concepts and an overview of the chapter. The textbook also includes "Items for Review" sections at the end of each chapter; it is recommendedthat the reader examine these items prior to reading the chapter to get a feel for the chapter's contents and to obtain some insight as to its more substantive aspects.

Other instructional aids include the "Practitioner's Perspectives," tables and figures, boxes with recent news items, and photographs to aid readers in understanding the work of policing. A listing of relevant Web sites is provided in Appendix A for readers who wish to independently obtain more information about various aspects of policing. Finally, a detailed index at the end of the book facilitates the reader's ability to locate specific topics more quickly.

CHAPTER ORGANIZATION AND OVERVIEW

Chapter 1 discusses the history of policing, and Chapter 2 examines the contemporary status of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies and their roles and functions. Chapter 3 examines the police subculture and how ordinary citizens are socialized to the role. The next chapter considers how police organizations are organized and administered and how administrators, middle managers, and supervisors perform their functions. Chapter 5 explores the very important function of patrolling and includes a discussion of the concepts of community policing and community problem solving.

Chapter 6, a new chapter, focuses on a rapidly spreading form of policing that is being embraced by thousands of police agencies across the United States and around the world: community oriented policing and problem solving—COPPS. Chapter 7 focuses on criminal investigation, including the highly progressive fields of forensic science and criminalistics, and Chapter 8 looks at several extraordinary police problems and methods: policing terrorism, hate crimes, and militias; the mafia; gangs; small jurisdictions; the homeless; and the nation's borders. The "rule of law" is discussed in Chapter 9, which delineates the constitutional guidelines that direct and constrain police actions. Chapter 10 looks at police accountability to the public, including the issues of police ethics, use of force, and corruption.

Police civil liability is examined in Chapter 11. Chapter 12 describes a number of trends and issues, including rights of police officers, women and minorities in policing, the private police, unionization, contract and consolidated policing, civilianization and accreditation of police agencies, higher education for police, and police stress. Then, to better understand policing in this country, Chapter 13 analyzes policing in four international venues: China, Mexico, Northern Ireland, and Saudi Arabia. Interpol, the international crime-fighting organization, is also discussed.

Chapter 14 examines police technology, including the myriad uses of computers, electronics, and imaging and communications systems. Developments with firearms and other tools are also discussed. Finally, Chapter 15 looks at the police of the future and how predictions are made.

The entire text provides the reader with a comprehensive and penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult, challenging, and obscure occupations in America.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This edition, like its three predecessors, is the result of the professional assistance of several practitioners and publishing people at Prentice Hall. First, I continue to benefit from my friendships and professional associations with Kim Davies, Executive Editor, and production editor Linda Pawelchak. The author also wishes to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of Steven Brandy University of Wisconsin, William E. Kelly, Auburn University; Charles Martin, Marshall University; and George Rush, California State University-Long Beach, whose review of this fourth edition resulted in many beneficial changes. Also, David Balleau and Michael Goo, Washoe County (Nevada) Sheriff's Office, provided photographic assistance.

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