ISBN-10:
0205186068
ISBN-13:
9780205186068
Pub. Date:
08/28/1997
Publisher:
Allyn & Bacon, Inc.
Policy-Based Profession: An Introduction to Social Welfare Policy for Social Workers / Edition 1

Policy-Based Profession: An Introduction to Social Welfare Policy for Social Workers / Edition 1

by Philip R. Popple, Leslie Leighninger

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780205186068
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon, Inc.
Publication date: 08/28/1997
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 368
Product dimensions: 7.23(w) x 9.59(h) x 0.95(d)

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
PART 1 Social Welfare Policy and the Social Work Progression 1(34)
The Policy-Based Profession
3(20)
The Target of Social Work---The Individual and Society
4(3)
The Social Function of Social Work
5(1)
The Dual Targets of Social Work
6(1)
The Dominance of Micro Practice
6(1)
Social Work's Pursuit of Professional Status
7(10)
Social work Grew Out of Voluntarism
8(1)
The Status of Women in American Society
8(1)
Professionalism as a Social Movement
8(1)
Professionalism and the Focus of Social Work
9(4)
The Policy-Based Profession
13(2)
Expert Technique
15(2)
Summary and Practice Implications
17(3)
Policy Determines the Major Goals of Service
18(1)
Policy Determines Characteristics of Clientele
19(1)
Policy Determines Who Will Get Services
19(1)
Policy Specifies, or Restricts, Certain Options for Clients
19(1)
Policy Determines the Theoretical Focus of Services
20(1)
Conclusions
20(1)
Notes
20(3)
Defining Social Welfare Policy
23(12)
Social Welfare Policy---Basic Definition
25(1)
Factors Complicating the Definition of Social Welfare Policy
26(7)
Social Welfare Policy and Social Policy
26(1)
Social Welfare Policy as an Academic Discipline and a Social Work Curriculum Area
27(2)
Social Workers Are Interested in Social Welfare Policy in All Sectors of the Economy
29(1)
The Multiple Layers of Social Welfare Policy
30(3)
Social Welfare Policy---A Working Definition
33(1)
Notes
34(1)
PART II Analyzing Social Welfare Policies 35(100)
Policy Analysis Outline
35(4)
Social Welfare Policy Analysis: Basic Concepts
39(24)
The Many Meanings of Policy Analysis
40(3)
Types of Policy Analysis
43(14)
Descriptive Analysis
44(8)
Process Analysis
52(1)
Evaluation
53(4)
Policy Analysis Approaches as Ideal Types
57(1)
Policy Analysis as Science, Art, and Politics
57(3)
Conclusion
60(1)
Notes
60(3)
Policy Analysis from an Historical Perspective
63(2)
Historical Context of Social Welfare Policies
64(9)
The Role of History in Understanding Policy
66(2)
Examples of Policy History
68(4)
Historical Analysis of Agency Policy
72(1)
Methods of Policy History
73(7)
The Benton Park Crisis Center
80(3)
Notes
83
Social/Economic Analysis
65(44)
Delineation of the Policy Under Analysis
87(1)
Social Problem Analysis
88(2)
Facts Related to the Problem
90(9)
Completness of Knowledge Related to the Problem
90(1)
Population Affected by the Problem
91(1)
Siocial Values Related to the Problem
91(7)
Racism, Sexism, and Related Group Superiority Themes
98(1)
Contradictions in the American Value System
98(1)
Goals of the Policy Under Analysis
99(2)
Hypotheses Underlying the Policy
101(1)
Economic Analysis
102(4)
Macroeconomic Analysis
103(1)
Opportunity Cost
104(1)
Effects on Individual Consumer Behavior
104(2)
Conclusion
106(1)
Notes
106(3)
Politics and Social Welfare Policy
109(26)
The Politics of Policy Making
115(2)
Models of Policy Making
117(13)
Who Makes Policy?
117(3)
How Are Policies Made?
120(2)
Phases in the Policy Process
122(8)
Conclusion
130(1)
Notes
131(4)
PART III The framework Applied 135(218)
Welfare Reform
141(38)
Historical Analysis
144(8)
Recent Welfare Reform Efforts
150(2)
Social Analysis
152(12)
Problem Description
152(1)
Population
153(1)
Size
153(1)
Cost
153(7)
Relevant Research
160(2)
Values and Welfare Reform
162(2)
Economic Analysis
164(6)
Macroeconomic Issues
164(4)
Microeconomic Analysis
168(2)
Evaluation
170(3)
Conclusion
173(2)
The Welfare System Is Not a Giant Failure
173(1)
Welfare Is Not the Problem, Poverty Is and Problem
173(1)
Realistic Welfare Reform is Possible, but not Likely
174(1)
Public Assistance is a Social Condition, Not a Social Problem
175(1)
Notes
175(4)
Aging: Social Security as an Entitlement
179(30)
The Problem that Social Security Was Developed to Solve
181(1)
The Social Security Act of 1935
182(2)
Historical Development of Social Security Programs in the United States
184(8)
Precedents of the Social Security Act
184(1)
Creation of the Social Security Act
185(5)
Changres in Social Security
190(2)
Contemporary Analysis of Social Security
192(10)
Social Analysis
192(5)
Political Analysis
197(1)
Economic Analysis and Proposals for Reform
198(4)
Conclusion
202(2)
Notes
204(5)
Mental Health: Managed Care
209(40)
The Problem that Managed Mental Health Care Was Developed to Solve
212(2)
The Costs of Mental Health Care
212(1)
Incidence and Treatment of Mental Health Problems
213(1)
managed Mental health Care
214(11)
How Does Managed Mental Health Care Work?
218(3)
Managed Care in an Agency Setting
221(2)
Managed Mental Health Care in the Public Sector
223(2)
The History of Managed Care
225(3)
The Economics of Managed Care
228(3)
Social Analysis of Managed Care
231(3)
The Political Context of Managed Care
234(3)
social Workers and Managed Care
237(5)
Conducting PreAuthorization Reviews
238(4)
Influencing the System
242(1)
Interview with an Advocate
242(1)
Coinclusion
243(1)
Notes
244(5)
Health: Medicaid and Medicare Changes
249(24)
The Problem that Medicare and Medicaid Were Developed to Solve
251(1)
The Health Needs of Poor and Older Americans
251(1)
The Medicare and Medicaid Legislation of 1965
252(1)
The Provisions of Medicare
252(1)
The Provisions of Medicaid
252(1)
The History of Medicare and Medicaid
253(4)
Social Analysis of Medicare and Medicaid
257(1)
Economic Analysis of Medicare and Medicaid
258(2)
Political Analysis of Medicare and Medicaid
260(7)
Proposald for Reform
267(2)
Conclusion
269(1)
Notes
270(3)
Child Welfare: Family Preservation
273(36)
Historical Analysis
277(12)
The Child Rescue Movement
278(1)
Social Work Takes Over
279(2)
Child Abuse Becomes the Dominant Theme
281(2)
Foster Care---From Solution to Problem
283(4)
The Emergence of Family Preservation
287(2)
Social Analysis
289(1)
Problem Description
289(6)
Politiczal Analysis
295(2)
Economic Analysis
297(1)
Policy/Program Evaluation
298(3)
Current Proposals for Policy Reform
301(1)
Conclusion
302(2)
Notes
304(5)
Conclusions: Lessons from Policy Analysis
309(44)
The Bottom Line is the Bottom Line
310(1)
Compassion and Protection: Dual Motivations for Social Welfare Policy
311(1)
Ideology Drives Out Data in Social Welfare Policy Making
311(1)
Policymakers Are Generally More Sophisticated Than They Appear
312(1)
Our Expectations for Social Welfare Policy Are Unrealistic
313(1)
Lower Your Expectations---Expect Change to Cost Much More Than Predicted
313(2)
Creaming Is Ok
314(1)
Don't Expect to Scrape the Bottom of the Barrel
314(1)
Don't Allow the Best to Defeat the Good
314(1)
Be Multi-Faceted But Not Holistic
315(1)
Notes
315(2)
Appendixes
A Library Research for Practitioner Policy Analysis by Lynn Tobola, M.L.S., Social Work Librarian, University of Alabama
317(30)
B Historical Policy Analysis Research
347(6)
Index 353

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